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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm about to order all my gaskets and bearings for my T140v. I am ordering Norman Hyde gaskets but the bearings on there are over £50 each for the mains! Bit steep I think.

Has anyone done a whole engine using SKF bearings? They are fairly local to me and prices are really good. I've used them a lot at work and they have always been fantastic.

I think the main thing I want is sizes, really! Anyone got any idea?
 

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Imperial roller bearings aren't cheap.It's also worthwhile buying the 3-piece roller bearing for the timing side main (RHP NUP 306 ET CN).Both these roller bearings would have normal "CN" internal clearance.

A timing side ball bearing would need to be C3 internal clearance.It's more trouble to assemble and not as strong as the 3-piece roller.

SKF make good bearings.I don't see any problem,if they've got what you want.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think the hardest thing is going to measuring each bearing up. Sounds like a bit of a nightmare.

Is there anywhere to get good bearings in the right sizes from? Just don't fancy paying way over the odds for what seems to be a pointless name!

Cheers chap!
 

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There will be number/letter codes on your old bearings. These will tell any bearing shop all they need to know, regardless of the make (to be double sure, take the old bearings in, don;t just write the numbers down).

Any bearings made in UK, USA, Germany or Japan will be good. The roller timing side bearing is a good upgrade for T140s (Pete gave the code above). You can get 'Superblend' drive side bearing conversions, as fitted as an upgrade to Commandos. These have a hardened steel sleeve fitted to reduce the ID to fit the Triumph crank. These should be a C3 internal clearance code, and the timing side roller bearings should be CN. The superblend conversion bearings are available from Kirby Rowbotham (google him for website etc). I bought one earlier this year and it was under £50, and that's a superior bearing with a specially made sleeve. NH's prices seem a tad on the dear side.
 

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given that the bearings are what separates your engine from a pile of scrap castings, and the hassle of going in to replace them, I'd go with a decent known supplier than chase down an equivalent to save a few quid.

Not suggesting that you waste money, but I'd rather "save" on easy to replace components so that if it turns out to have been a bad move, I can swap it over in an afternoon ( while swearing profusely) rather than delve into the bowels of the bike
 

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I agree with that Dave - what I was getting at was that the retailer makes no difference to the quality, only to the price (some retailers hike the price up knowing that some customers will not look elsewhere) - its the manufacturer that counts, and any of the really well established US, UK, German or Japanese maufacturers are good. Though worth watching out for 'made under licence' items which can seem like they're made by a good brand but are in fact made in China or somewhere. The retailer should know for sure where they are made. If they don't know, go somewhere else.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Yeah nice one. I'll probably just do that then in that case. I'll take all the old bearings into SKF and have them get a new set. I'll have a look at those superblend ones too. Sounds like an idea.

I have tried various bearing manufacturers in the past through work and SKF have always been flawless. I definitely trust them!
 
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