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The clutch on my 2012 T-100 was getting a little chattery and I noticed some slippage in the power band while really pouring on the coal to get around traffic at a decent clip, so I figured it’s time for an upgrade. I did a little research and Barnett Clutches with green springs seemed to be the all-around choice. The install seemed straightforward, simple even, with the gospel caution offered at every turn to “not forget the wavy washer” that goes on the idler shaft.

(CAUTION: failure to replace the wavy washer will result in destabilization of the black hole at the center of the universe resulting in the tearing of the space-time continuum, so for the love of God, don’t forget it!)

Finally, the day came that I had a few hours to spare, the clutch kit, and a new OEM gasket, so it was time to drain the oil, drop the clutch cover and get to work. Que the misadventure:

Naturally, Triumph service techs had fitted an OEM oil filter instead of a K&N with the handy little nut cast to the bottom and after going through every filter wrench in a five house radius, “**** it,” I said and drove a flat head screw driver through the filter wall and off it came. Not the neatest method, but it works. I dumped the oil with little issue, leveled the bike and opened up the clutch cover. Unfortunately, the cover holds about another cup of oil which promptly spilled out onto the driveway. Oh joy.

Cleaned up the mess, snagged the devilish wavy washer, stashed it in a safe place, and then identified the clutch basket. Next, I started to take the 10mm bolts off holding the lifter plate binding the springs down. Got it off with little issue, then went on to the big nut holding the plate assembly and hit my second snag. As it turns out, M23 and 23mm the same size, are not. “Use the metric system!” they said. “It will be fun!” they said.

A quick trip to Home Depot, and a $20 30mm socket saw that to rights. Made it back and used the tried and true, “stand on the rear brake and wrench for all you’re worth,” method and off came the nut.

Next, I pulled the old clutch plates. I wasn’t wrong in my assumption; after 50k miles, these plates we’re looking a little tired. The pads were worn thin and there were a few scorch marks, but to their credit, they knew their time had come and popped right out.

Now a few things about the Barnett clutches: Barnett advises that you soak the new clutch stack in oil for about three minutes prior to assembly, wipe clean with a tack free cloth, and drop them in. I imagine this alleviates the initial clutch wear from dry pads, so it sounds like good advice to me.
Another note, the new Barnett clutches are not the same as the old Barnett clutches. If you do a search on Triumphrat or google, you’ll see a lot of information about the old Barnett clutches and how they had two clutch rings that were odd ducks out, with a larger ID and smaller pads. These were to go on the inside and the outside of the rest. The NEW Barnett clutches only have one odd duck out. I saw a post about some guy and his mechanic having a head scratcher about where this is supposed to go and decided it should go to the outside of the assembly. This is not true. The odd ring needs to go closest to the bike. I had it the other way around at first and luckily caught the error before going much further than putting the big nut back on, (by the way, that big nut has a washer with the word “OUT” stamped on one side; seems prudent to heed these words of wisdom”

Got that sorted out, and worked the plates into the basket, then slid the center piece into the rings. It only occurred to me after that it would have made far more sense to stack the plates on this inner assemble and put the entire thing in at once. C’est la vie. I should note here that for the low, low price of $9,865.89 Triumph will sell you a tool to hold these plates in alignment. Don’t do it! These stacks go in easy enough on their own. Basically, one must get the stack in the correct order, and push the first one in, then when it falls into place, rotate the stack to get the next one lined up. This is not hard at all.
Another thing that can (did) go sideways here is the big gear behind the clutch basket can slide out once the large nut is removed. If it does so, it must be in an exact position to rehouse properly (seems like there is a keyed shaft back there somewhere). I ended up having to rotate it tooth by tooth until I got the right alignment, then it slid right back in.

By now it was getting late, so I figured I’d call it a day after torqueing the big nut down to 105 nm and then spending some time on cleaning the mating surfaces of the cover/engine. Everyone says not to use metal scrapers here, but for the life of me, I don’t know how else you’re supposed to do it. For the love of god, don’t use an electric tool with any kind of serious abrasion. I used razor blades at a very small angle and worked carefully. A heat gun helped to soften up the old gasket and after a few hours of tedious work, it was mostly clean. Now, I did leave a few small marks from the blade, so I went back over the surface with 400, 600, and 1000 grit sand paper on a block until I got a surface I was happy with. Take note, the cover is a lot harder to gouge than the aluminum engine block, but it’s a lot easier to buy a new cover than to shave the block, so care needs to be taken on this part. One also needs to make sure that no contaminants get into the gears at this point, so it’s a good idea to use a rag or some plastic to tarp off the innards.

Day two. Started early and did some final work cleaning the mating surfaces. I used a cleaning agent and degreaser to make sure things were spic and span. I went to Auto Zone for some goop and found to my dismay that most of the compounds recommend a 24-hour cure time before adding fluids, and I had to be at work the next day so that wasn’t going to cut it. I called a buddy and marine mechanic and he recommended Permatex No. 2 as the gasket sealer. This stuff tacks up and it’s ready for service. No extended cure time, it’s not affected by oil, and it’s great at sealing surfaces with minor imperfections.

Got back to the bike, then started to put the lifter assembly back on. I was using a borrowed torque wench and at some point it occurred to me that the pressure I was putting on the 4 stainless 10mm bolts which compress the springs via the lifter plate did not jive with the “10nm” of any sane person. I figured it was time to go back to Auto Zone and get a wrench I could trust.

This done, I started to take the bolts off and was beset by my version of personal hell. “SNAP,” one bolt head ripped off. **** my life. Went to the opposing bolt, backed it out three threads, “oka- SNAP” it broke off. Jesus, Mary, and Joseph I almost lost it. I had to be at work in less than 20 hours and I knew I was doomed. I called every machine shop in the area for a solution. Apparently some don’t work on automotive parts, although for all intents and purposes, I don’t know what in the hell difference it makes for my situation: the remaining two bolts came off and I could bring the lifter assembly and sheared studs with me. I suppose I should have told them that it went to a gumball machine, but I digress.

Finally, a machinist took pity on my soul and told me to bring it over. I arrived in a hurry and he looked at the assembly, the length of the bolt shaft and shook his head as I blurted out my sob story. “Don’t get your hopes up,” he says. The machinist takes my name and number and said he’d get back to me in a few days. I cried harder. “Okay, I’ll have a look now.” I stood in sheer (shear?) amazement as he backed one of the studs out by hand. In my panic, I hadn’t even attempted to remove the stud on my own fearing utter certainty in the demise of the assembly that would result. He put a tiny drill bit into the other stud and it too came out. I could not believe what I just witnessed. Neither could the machinist. He laughed and told me to have a good day, free of charge.

I hit up the local hardware store for a few replacement bolts, “screw stainless, grade 8s are going back in.” Found what I needed and headed back to the bike. I oiled the bolts, and slid all four in to hand tightness, then torqued them down with the good torque wrench in a rotating pattern (one turn a piece) to 10nm once the springs caught. Voila, it was done. Now, inside the lifter assembly sets a bearing inside which goes this rotating presser pin (sorry, don’t know the exact term). When the assembly is torqued down, this bolt must be free to rotate and should slide in without binding.

Next, I gooped up the cover, put the gasket on and bolted it all back to 9nm (not forgetting the wavy washer!) put the shift lever back on and the clutch cable and then went to work the clutch lever. The cable now had a ridiculous amount of slack in it. I have aftermarket stainless cables which were too loose to begin with and now I feared I didn’t have enough adjustment left to get the throw I needed.

Fearing something must be out of place, I ripped open the clutch cover once more. Everything seemed okay. ****. I need expert advice. I tried calling my Triumph dealer; they’re closed. I figured I could post on Triumphrat, but I was running short of time. So I called Bill at Bonneville Performance who I had been talking to about big jugs (heh), and he gave me a few things to check and also said that this sometimes happens.

I looked into the assembly on the clutch cover, made sure the “bullet” was moving as it should be and at some point got the idea that the shift pin looked high and gave it a few bumps to push it back down. Another mistake. That unseated the spring, and now the entire shifter assembly had to come out of the clutch cover to get it reset. Naturally, I didn’t have the T30 bit to do this, so another trip to Auto Zone ensued. For the record, those torx bolts are the most stubbornly set fasteners imaginable, but I eventually got the assembly unbolted and the spring reset. Now back to the clutch…

I figured that Bill was right and the cable was just looser now; it happens, after all. So I decide to put the entire thing back together again (don’t forget the wavy washer!). Permatex No. 2 saved my ass here as a regular gasket sealant would have hardened and rendered the new OEM gasket unusable at this point. Even so, I figured it would be a miracle if I could get the cover to seal. But I did. I screwed the new oil filter in (did you really think I would forget this?) and lubed the engine up. Well, one quart anyway, then I realized that the drain plug was still out. FUCKSHITDAMNIT. Quickly slid that back in, finished oiling, and cleaned up the unholiest of messes.

Finally, the moment of truth. I turned the key and hit the starter. “Click.” Then silence. Hit it again, “click.” At this point my will to live was slowly but certainly fading. I searched Triumphrat to try to figure out exactly how I had destroyed my engine. Turns out, the idler gear just kind of hangs in there on its shaft and can very easily come out of place. “That must be it!” I thought.

Of course, now the cover had to come off once more on a fully oiled bike. Gee what fun! I laid the bike over as far as I could to the starboard side (another Triumphrat tip) and got it off. Sure enough, the idler gear was out of place. Getting the alignment just right is a little fiddly but eventually, the gear shaft will slide into place. This entailed working the coupled gear back and forth a bit but eventually it went in. It took a large amount of patience and every second of my life’s accumulated, if sporadic, meditation regimen to not wale on the pin with a sledge.

Finally, I could put the cover on for the last time. Popped it on, torqued down all the bolts but one, looked down to pick it up and saw the G%d Da%&*d Wavy washer cheerfully staring me in the face. I was livid. Ripped the cover off, put the stupid washer in its hole, bolted the cover back into place (went to 10nm on the bolts because god knows this thing is now going to leak like a sieve no matter what I do), put the bike back on its stand and it fired right up.

A quick test ride proved what a joy it is to use this clutch! It grabs and pulls like a tractor. I hardly even minded that it was now storming buckets. Got back and noticed a little oil leaking, (who woulda thunk?) but after a final torque of the heretofore cold bolts, that dried up and all was well in the world.

Well, almost all. I still had to shorten the clutch cable. This post has gone on far past acceptable lengths so I won’t go into details, but basically I sliced, soldered, and dremeled a new end fitting. Rode 80 miles into work this morning through pea soup fog and that was that.

RWHP is now at 2092. Here are some beautiful before and after pictures of my Bonnie:




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Good morning read. Thank you for sharing the entertaining tale. Lot's useful information and some laughs to go along. (y)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Bahaha, I think your admiration sould be better placed elsewhere. Thanks for all the post love, glad not everyone is scared witless of my epic length sagas :LOL:
 

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Great write-up - sounds like me trying to make first practice back in my svelte(ish) days. Two points to ponder - a thin film of motor oil does good job as a gasket sealant, and makes the gasket much easier to remove, even to the point that it can be reused. I don't know that I would take the cover surface to 1000 grit; gasket surfaces are generally left as machined finish so that the irregularities bite into the gasket material.

I realise it doesn't apply to wire-spoked wheels (I wouldn't do it, at any rate), but with cast wheels you can stick a wooden or rubber mallet (or 2x4, or ... ) through the spokes when torquing the clutch hub nut. Saves having to lean on the brake pedal while trying to read a torque wrench!
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Great write-up - sounds like me trying to make first practice back in my svelte(ish) days. Two points to ponder - a thin film of motor oil does good job as a gasket sealant, and makes the gasket much easier to remove, even to the point that it can be reused. I don't know that I would take the cover surface to 1000 grit; gasket surfaces are generally left as machined finish so that the irregularities bite into the gasket material.

I realise it doesn't apply to wire-spoked wheels (I wouldn't do it, at any rate), but with cast wheels you can stick a wooden or rubber mallet (or 2x4, or ... ) through the spokes when torquing the clutch hub nut. Saves having to lean on the brake pedal while trying to read a torque wrench!
Interesting... I like the oil on the gasket tip. It's probably just me, but I have a hard time trusting paper gaskets alone. I've used them on positive displacement water pumps and almost always had the damn things leak salt-water everywhere.

I considered not going down to 1000 grit, but seems to be holding fine. I was pretty concerned with surface irregularities.
 

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Great write up EXCEPT for your concern that there was no K&N welded-nut oil filter on the bike! That is the exact opposite reaction you should have! Do a search for K&N oil filter failures on these forums and internet as a whole and you will be shocked at the failure rate from the tack weld points. One guy posted last year (?) of one failing on the T100 while riding along, cated his rear tire before he saw the oil light come on. Didn't crash out but trashed his engine. K&N ultimately coughed up for a new powerplant. Never used these things...get a proper cap-type filter wrench to fit the 204 sized filters and never speak of these again.
 
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