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I personally would never use a backpack. It puts weight up high where you don't want it,and must be uncomfortable. Why not use a tailpack or a small topbox,which would be more secure

I use a kriega r25 and the weight is held lower and more central on the bike then any tail bag.
Think about it.A tail bag attached to the back of the bike is higher then the riders seat,and further back.
Uncomfortable?you can hardly notice it.If your not familiar with the kriega stuff,do a lil research you may be surprised.


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I carry a back pack a lot. To shop for small things and for work. It's a Nike mesh hi-viz pack. My thoughts is if you have to carry one, make it very visible.
 

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I pick up my new Scrambler next week and am looking for a not-ridiculously-expensive backpack to wear around town, on the way to work, or if I wanna go visit friends for a night or two.
I use a Timbuk2 Messenger Bag. Oh wait, you said you don't want something that is ridiculously expensive. ;) Nevertheless, it is a darn good bag.

I also use a magnetic Marsee tank bag. I have two that must be 20 years old. They still do the job.
 

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I pick up my new Scrambler next week and am looking for a not-expensive backpack with USB charging to wear around town, on the way to work, or if I wanna go visit friends for a night or two.

I just moved to a new town for a job (which let me buy the bike) and it's incredibly boring, so my plan is to live in the office M-F and then disappear on the bike on weekends.

Eventually the snow will come and i'll deal with my reality then.

Thanks!
Then a medium-capacity backpack such as a commuter backpack is worth considering, either MATEIN or OMOUBOI. I know MATEIN better. It looks small, but has ample internal space, and even has a few "hidden" pockets. I was able to carry a few pens with me, a laptop, socks and a shirt, and the remaining space.
 

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Posted before I realized it was a zombie thread.
 

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Really? I've never heard of that. Can you cite even one case where that actually happened, or is that more of a "a friend of a buddy told me he knew a guy..." sort of thing.
 

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Really? I've never heard of that. Can you cite even one case where that actually happened, or is that more of a "a friend of a buddy told me he knew a guy..." sort of thing.
No specifics, occured somewhere in the early 70's or early 80's in Germany. I think Neil Tolhurst (if he's still with the Motorcycle Safety Foundation) should be familiar with the incident. The backpack snagged on the Armco or similar and the arm separated.
 

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So...this may have happened once?
Maybe. The last solid documentation I have on my shelf regarding motorcycle accidents is the Hurt report so I'm way out of date. Accidents are pretty individual and it may have been a "one off". I know, however, that I fell skiing once and was shocked by how hard I was yanked on by my backpack while sliding.

If you don't have a copy of the Hurt report, I suggest picking up a copy as there are many interesting safety take-aways in there. I have always regarded "crash bars" as somewhat threatening after the fellow had his led torn off at the hip after the folded bar trapped his leg.

For me, "one off" accidents are still worthy of consideration.

It only took one castration for Honda to stop supplying gas caps which flipped forward. And it only took one Armco disembowelment to cause me to go a little slower through the Armco lined sweeper at Barber. Same with the Armco fatality at Putnam Park's final turn. I always left just a bit of safety in my turn in point and line after that bloody scene.
 

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Krieger R25 for me also.. and what's more it's still in great condition, have another one(that folds up like a shopping bag) which is around 25 to 30 year's old .. got it free from Superbike or Bike magazine Real good Value for money, old thread or not would still recommend my old K R25 mind you :)
 

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Raises a good question....safety issues associated with wearing a back pack, not by choice, but of necessity to carry a few items, waterproofs..etc. plus maybe a laptop. As a regular commuter, often wondered about the adverse effects. On the one hand you have some added back protection. But on the other side, not clear of the resulting effect in slide band falling on the rest of the body. Obviously each incident is different. What is the best way to handle an unintended dismount? Roll? Slide? Or tumble?

Appreciate any members sharing their experiences if they were wearing a back pack during an unplanned dismount.

Speed? Incident description, damage and associated injuries? Sorry if this sounds a bit morbid, but as always experience and knowledge sharing makes us all better and safer riders!

Ride safe, thanks, Thruxty.
 

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Another happy Kriega owner here. You won't be disappointed. Ironically, I got mine at the local Triumph dealer for 40% off. That never happens with Kriega stuff. I was super lucky.
 

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What is the best way to handle an unintended dismount? Roll? Slide? Or tumble?
I can't comment about "with a backpack on" as I don't ride with one. Aside from the aforementioned issues there is also the possibility of causing a spinal or rib/kidney issue if there are hard objects in the backpack between you and the ground. The spinal issue is similar to the concern over carrying your handgun in a "small of the back" holster. Most people steer clear of that due to the possibility of disabling injury.

That said, I have fallen off many times and in a generic sense it is MUCH better to slide than roll or tumble. Rolls and tumbles break bones! If you're sliding on your back, keep your hands off the ground except to steer, keep your feet up to avoid catching and tumbling and keep your head tucked up. Try to watch where you're going and steer with your hands if needed to avoid hard things. Try to go feet forwards as legs heal but heads and necks can be fatal in a hard impact.

Watch for curbs though, and tumble over if possible because they'll break anything including your hip.

If you're sliding on your belly and face your options are more limited but try to avoid tumbling and if you have time steer into the feet first mode to avoid head and neck injury. Be thankful for your full face helmet because your face will plant into the pavement.

Keep an eye on the trajectory of your bike and try to get away from it because it will really clobber you if it flips onto you or follows you into something hard.

Staying on the sliding bike can be a real loser if it suddenly digs in and high sides you!
 
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