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When my son gets to be 50 something he will have a different view of what a classic bike is. Just as my dad did and so on and so on. It matters not to me if the Bonneville is in style in ten years or 10 minutes. I like em and I have one, so. Some of the very younger rides in my area that love the looks of my bike have no idea that it an older style bike.
 

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The bonneville line to many including myself reminds folks of what a motorcycle should look like. Its simple in all aspects. It is really about what you are into, and the bonneville line fits the style of the cafe racer just like sport bikes have their own style. Harley has been making the same style of bikes essentially since they have been in business. There isn't much difference between a 2012 softtail heritage, and a 68' FLH.

When one goes looking for a bike, even with all of the options out there, it still seems limiting. You have your choice of cruisers that all look the same, sport bikes that look the same, and adventure bikes that all look similar. Then there is the Bonneville line and there is something different about it even though it hasn't changed in decades.

I do know that people really like my bike when they see it, and to most of them I don't think it is because it reminds them of an old motorcycle. A couple my wife and I were out with the other day asked me what kind of bike I got and I said a Triumph. they said, "what is that a Yamaha?" So I guess they never even heard of Triumph.

I hope people are still tweaking british, and italian bikes 10 or 20 years from now that resemble the cafe racer style. I guess it really doesn't matter as long as I can still get parts for my bike.
 

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I agree with the sentiment that it doesn't matter to me if the Bonneville is still produced 10 years from now and that parts availability is now and later will be a concern.

But should the Bonnie continue to be in production, I'd be very curious to see how it evolves.
 

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When my son gets to be 50 something he will have a different view of what a classic bike is. Just as my dad did and so on and so on. It matters not to me if the Bonneville is in style in ten years or 10 minutes. I like em and I have one, so. Some of the very younger rides in my area that love the looks of my bike have no idea that it an older style bike.
Both of my sons - mid 20s - learned to ride on the Bonneville and still ride it quite frequently. I don't know if they will ever buy one as their regular ride ..... but they surely enjoy mine!! One son picked up a very nice Kawasaki ZR7 for grad school and the other is still looking around for his first bike purchase.
 

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I agree with the sentiment that it doesn't matter to me if the Bonneville is still produced 10 years from now and that parts availability is now and later will be a concern.

But should the Bonnie continue to be in production, I'd be very curious to see how it evolves.
We have seen nostalgia bike evolution for decades. Harley learned years ago that swapping parts from one bike to another mix-and-match along with special paint jobs can keep the same models going forever! The original Softail gets a new fender and becomes the Deuce. Another new fender, the Blackline.

Now we see the McQueen, the 110th anniversary, the T100 Black etc. As long as bike riders continue to age, these bikes will be around.
 

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36 Years old. had 11 crotch rockets and 2 harleys. no longer care about speed or bling. the scrambler and bonneville represent who I am now as a person, a little older than some, still have plenty of class and style though :D I rode my bonneville 120 miles yesterday and hit every backroad around on the map. you can feel the heritage like melancholia... it's my time machine, when I ride it ... it feels like 1950's and 60's when the world might have been a better place.
 

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Early 40's... But the Scrambler because I thought it would be fun... And it kind of reminds me one of my first bicycle



-

Oddly enough, I'm having as much fun on the Scram as I remember having on that bike :D

Life is good!
 

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I bought my Bonneville, (my first motorcycle,) new when I was 25. Now, I am 29 and still have the same bike, (though you wouldn't recognize it by looks.) I chose the Bonneville for several reasons. First, and fore most, I Just liked the look and feel of the Bonneville over anything else that I was considering at that time. Second, after I learned the history of the bike, I fell even more in love. Third, I wanted something a little different than what everyone else had. (Please don't confuse that with a desire to be a 'hipster' who only buys things that are different for the sake of being a 'non-conformist.' I assure you, I am pretty square.) Fourth, price did play a factor. I felt that I was getting a lot of bang for my buck.
 

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Pity the poor sucker who ages and still only prefers the styles & music of his generation. The chicks I prefer don't ride with their tail end perched high on silly looking sport bikes...they whine when they're not gettin' their's, and I'm not interested in balancing a hog-ified 800 lb. bagger every time the light changes hue, just so the skinny meat wiggling my line of choice is comfy. After 50 years of motorcycling...been there, done that...I want a bike that will surprise me...like when a foot peg falls off standing up...the rubber they used that falls apart because the air is to blame from a company who waves a century flag and doesn't blink is a slap in the consumer face only a real man with some history endures...as dawns the little crooked crazy smile from the corner of a bug encrusted visage...and a twinkle that tells the girls the Handy Man delivers...

and then, 2nd, I like the gas mileage better than say a $4/gal. sharp stick in the eye
 

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35 here, though I bought my Bonneville when I was 31. Learned to ride in one of the MSF courses years before that but didn't know what kind of bike I really wanted - just "not sportbike" and "not Harley." Bought a Honda Shadow which was nice but lacked character and didn't quite have the right ergonomics for me.

It was my wife who suggested the Bonneville - because she wanted one. She was in love with the vintage cafe racer aspect. But what hooked me was sitting on one and realizing there was a forgotten riding posture between cruiser and crotch rocket that the market wasn't really filling well these days. We traded in my Shadow on two Bonnevilles and never looked back.

I've occasionally thought I might like a slightly larger/more comfy bike for distance/adventure type riding, along the lines of a Tiger, but I don't think I'll ever get rid of the Bonneville.

Jeff
 

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60 and still loving the Bonneville. I only started riding 4 years ago and motorcycles weren't on my radar, not a bit. About a year ago I started to fixate on Triumph, particularly Bonneville. Got my in late April and I'm still lusting for it.

My son, 30, thought it looked "nice", but wasn't overly excited about it. He was home for a visit last month. He rode his mother's Shadow and liked it. He rode my NT700V and like it. He rode the Bonneville (in that order). After he rode the Bonnie, he wouldn't ride anything else. LOL
 

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I just turned 30 a few weeks back. I bought my Bonneville brand new when I was 25. It was my first motorcycle and I put the first mile on it. Been an amazing ride since.
 

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I'm 58, got my Scrambler in late 2008, got my Thruxton 4 weeks ago...keeping both.

Rds Terry
 

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47 here...I suppose old enough to appreciate the heritage but young enough not to remember the Bonnies of yore firsthand (for example, the "kink" in the pipe does not bother me). I think I reached a point where fast was (and still is) fun but just want to ride.

There's a lot to be said for heritage here. Most of the younger types here in the office seem to like my Bonneville a lot. In fact, one perhaps about half my age just bought a new SE. There's hope...
 
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