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Discussion Starter #1
So I got a new battery in yesterday, charge it and go to put it in and (I hope I am wrong here) but you have to pull the tank to put the thing in.. come on.. are the seat bolts not bad enough..
 

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I assume that you're talking about the 1050 ST. According to the manual it is not a serviceable item!

C'mon, you wanted a slim, speedy sports bike. Didn't you?? :)
 

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hey buddy, I feel your pain.. a few days after picking up my used 06"dead battery"... luckily I was 1/2 a block from a bike shop that sold me a new battery.. i get back to the bike.. and yep you have to pull the tank..:mad: not having the correct tools, i had to improvise...

I just pulled the damn thing out somehow, kinda wedging it out... putting the new one in was even HARDER.. about 1/2 hour from start to finish
 

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So I got a new battery in yesterday, charge it and go to put it in and (I hope I am wrong here) but you have to pull the tank to put the thing in.. come on.. are the seat bolts not bad enough..
Fortunately you can remove the two bolts and prop the tank up with a wedge to clear the battery to pull it out. No need to remove the whole tank.
 

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All you need to do is lift the back of the tank. Just undo the bolt at the back, lift the bum end up and slide your battery in. Really not a big deal.

Geeez guys I hope you never have to change your spark plugs if this is an issue.
 

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All you need to do is lift the back of the tank. Just undo the bolt at the back, lift the bum end up and slide your battery in. Really not a big deal.

Geeez guys I hope you never have to change your spark plugs if this is an issue.
sure at home with your tools.. it's no biggie

try it stuck on the side of the road..:eek:

but in stinky's defense.. usually the battery on most bikes are a little easier to swap out..:cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
To replace the battery on my cbr,gs,wr took all of 3 min, use the key to pop the seat, and two screws, lift it out and drop the new one in.

This one is two screws in the seat, a bolt on the tank, and the two screws in the battery, then have to put it all back together. It just doesn't make much sense to me to make it this hard.

By the way.. spark plugs were almost as easy on the cbr.. seat, two screws and I was at them the tank tilted on its end to get to "underneath it"
 

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I removed the battery from my 08 Sprint just this week. It took
about 5 minutes.

First I removed the seat attachment bracket ( 2 small bolts). Then
I removed the battery strap and disconnected and removed the
battery.

I didn't read the manual, so perhaps I didn't follow correct procedure :D

Tom
 

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You can talk all you want about a CBR but last time I checked this isn't a cbr. You have a fully faired Triumph. Yeah you can say "oh at home with your tools" but you have everything you need to change that battery in your throttle side glove box anywhere, anytime.

The spark plugs are burried under your tank, your airbox and way down in the cylinder but guess what, you can also do all that with the tools in your tool satchel. My point is the battery really isnt that big of a deal especially now that you have done it once.

I am not trying to be bulligerent or start a debate. I am just stating the facts.
 

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As stated above, changing the battery doesn't need removing the tank. Have a friend to just hold the tank up for 10 seconds whilst you slip out the old and slide in the new one is the easiest route.
The battery only needs replacing every few years, so it's isn't too bad and it can be charged through the accessory plug so you don't even have to look at it for the rest of the time. :)

Sure at home with your tools.. it's no biggie

try it stuck on the side of the road..:eek:
Why would you want to take out the battery at the side of the road?:rolleyes:
 

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You can talk all you want about a CBR but last time I checked this isn't a cbr. You have a fully faired Triumph. Yeah you can say "oh at home with your tools" but you have everything you need to change that battery in your throttle side glove box anywhere, anytime.

The spark plugs are burried under your tank, your airbox and way down in the cylinder but guess what, you can also do all that with the tools in your tool satchel. My point is the battery really isnt that big of a deal especially now that you have done it once.

I am not trying to be bulligerent or start a debate. I am just stating the facts.
Well said.
 

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I can understand the frustration though, why make something tricky when it doesn't need to be?

Often something is made overly complex when it really doesn't need to be. Why not make it so the battery is easy to just lift and and put in a new one? Why not make it easy to get to the plugs or replace a filter?

The simplest design is often the best.

Sorry, rant over.
 

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Why would you want to take out the battery at the side of the road?:rolleyes:
you would not WANT to do it on the side of the road

That's just what life threw at me that day.. she would not push start.. I was miles from my house... and I got lucky and purchased a batt a block away from where she died.. sometimes you need to do what you need to do... :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #14
You can talk all you want about a CBR but last time I checked this isn't a cbr. You have a fully faired Triumph.

Your right this isn't my CBR.. the CBR was a lot easier to work on then this thing.. (and the cbr was a fully faired bike to I am not sure what you point was there..)

My point is I do not understand why they make this thing so hard to work on. The battery should be as easy as a oil change. Hell even the seat is a pain to work on.. I do not know if you need to call it over engineered or under but ether way just a little thought would have made a world of difference.
 

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Stinky, I am not trying to get up on you. I don't mean to come across that way. When you said CBR for some reason I was thinking CB's.

In the end the seat is two bolts. Two bolts...... it is a far simpler system then key locks, levers and moving parts that wear out. Triumph does not intend you to go under the seat that often. If you are removing your seat more than once a year then you have a bigger problem. If you look over to your left you will see a jockey box with a key tumbler and that is where you are intended to store stuff.

As far as the battery, yeah they could of moved the tray back 1 inch and got out from under the tank tabs but they didn't. Oh well.

My Suzuki Intruder with no fairings, a nice v twin that I could get at the plugs at no problem, well its battery was under the bike and only accessable between the frame and exhaust and you had to undo a trap door under the bike which let the battery fall on the pavement but not far enough to get the battery out. You had to stand the bike up and roll in forward to the battery tipped out.

The Sprint is a snap compared to that.

We all chose to buy a fully faired, hemispherical plug configuration bike. Engineers only have so much space to deal with and have to get things balanced and efficient. Think you have a 1050cc bike producing 130hp. That ratio is better then most exoctic sports cars. A Chevy Corvette uses 6000cc's to produce 500hp.

My point: It is what it is. Plugs take time to change, oil takes time to change and the battery needs you to undo the tank and lift 2 inches to get out. Oh well. You still get on it, you still get a small rush when it starts and you still ride it with a smile. If you don't then you need to sell it and find something that gives you that rush when you ride it, maybe a CBR.
 

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Hi Stinky,

The guys are right its not that big of a deal. But I also think Triumph could have made the battery box in such a way (bringing it back 2 inches) so that you could just pull the battery out.
 

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Just wait until you have to change the high beam bulb, that one's an adventure. :Devil3:
Oh god i know.... You'd think that something like changing a bulb would be made easy, after all a bulb will blow and need to be replaced...

I want to change mine for xenons to allow me to at least see the road but I really am not in the mood to take the front fairing off and then get to the light unit and see if I have to pull that out.

My harley is way easier to do it on
 

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English stuff has been has always been hard to work on since they invented the Mini! It must be a British thing

It is a pain to do some things and it would be nice if it was easy ... but unfortunately it's not. :(

If you wanted a bike that was easy to work on you could buy a Royal Enfield Bullet @ 27.2 HP. You could work on that allot. Or should I say would and that would be easy, even on the side of the road :)

As Calli said. It is highly engineered and a blast to ride. Enjoy the upside. :D
 
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