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Hey peeps,

So I myself own the 765 RS. Love it. What I really love about it is the predictability and smooth power delivery/fueling. It's just a very well composed package which is a joy to ride in the twisties.

Were the 675 Street Triples the same? Are there any particular model years that had issues with choppy fueling etc?

The reason why I am asking is because my brother fell in love with my 765. He is on a Yamaha FZ09 / MT09 right now. While it's a fun bike, the differences are jarring and he would like to get a 675R Street Triple with the hope that it would be as smooth as the 765.

Can anybody chime in?

Before somebody recommends, fuel controller and aftermarket suspension for the FZ09, let me preface that I have ridden one with full Ohlins set up (front and back) full Akrapovic system and a custom dyno tune. It was pretty great but I still liked how smooth the 765 was. Besides my brother is not looking to spend the $$$ on upgrading the FZ09.
 

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From what I understand the 765 doesn't like full throttle right off idle under load. The 675 will do this and pull away smoothly in any gear. Fueling can be a bit choppy on/off throttle but can be fixed with a proper dyno tune and some basic throttle and drive chain slack adjustments.
 

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675 R was the best naked bike ever made. The only bike to better it is the 765, but not by much. In my opinion (as a former dealer and current owner) is that the R and S models of the 765 are a tiny bit more responsive low down, with RS taking the lower mid range to top end to a whole new level. The 675 had it bottom to top.
 

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I'd say the 675 is even smoother than the 765. The 675 didn't have the top end rush at 8k like the 765 does, it was more level all the way up. I quite like that rush though. :)
 

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I had 2 2014 675 STRs before my current RS, and I recall the throttle response at low rpm could be jerky, where they were smooth everywhere else. On the 765RS, I'm usually running in Sport mode, and yes, low-rpm response is abrupt when I forget not to be ham-fisted. In Rain and Road modes, much smoother, but I miss the higher-rpm kick!
 

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I'd say the 675 is even smoother than the 765. The 675 didn't have the top end rush at 8k like the 765 does, it was more level all the way up. I quite like that rush though. :)
A set of Daytona cams and a dyno tune and it will not only pull hard at 8k but make more power than a 765.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I had 2 2014 675 STRs before my current RS, and I recall the throttle response at low rpm could be jerky, where they were smooth everywhere else. On the 765RS, I'm usually running in Sport mode, and yes, low-rpm response is abrupt when I forget not to be ham-fisted. In Rain and Road modes, much smoother, but I miss the higher-rpm kick!
Ditto!

Sport mode has too abruptive fueling for street riding in my opinion. I tend to stay in Road and Rain when out and about in the twisties.

Once my shoulder heals up I am hitting up the track this spring, so it will be awesome to finally stretch the legs out in sport mode haha
 

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A set of Daytona cams and a dyno tune and it will not only pull hard at 8k but make more power than a 765.
That's a bold claim, care to back it up? Most Daytona 675s dyno'd in the low teens, 113, 114. Some in the low 120s that had full exhausts and such.

the 765RS is dyno'ing mid 120s stock. Full systems are just now coming out, so hopefully we will see what kind of gains can be made there soon.
 

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Putting a 1050 throttle tube and adjusting out (almost) all the cable slack helped to smooth the off/on throttle transitions on my 675. Kind of hard to do that on a 765, though. ;)
 

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Putting a 1050 throttle tube and adjusting out (almost) all the cable slack helped to smooth the off/on throttle transitions on my 675. Kind of hard to do that on a 765, though. ;)
That’s a fast action throttle tube - the cable cam in the grip is thicker, meaning less movement of the wrist for the same pull. It’s a great and cheap mod to do if you want to enable snappier gear changes and faster transitions, and makes it easier on the wrist to hit the full throttle stop, but in my experience it did make the bike twitchier in ‘ordinary’ riding.
 

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I know all that, but I guess I don't think of it as making the bike "twitchy," but rather more "responsive."
 

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I have a 2016 R and a 2018 RS.

2016 has way better throttle response and control.

I find with the 18, I have to give it twice the gas to get going. Huge delay with the ride by wire. The windscreen options are horrible for the RS. I have tried them all and they are all terrible. The RS has wicked turbulence on the highway with or without windscreen. Also hate the controls on the HMI. I have no idea why there are 2 buttons to interact. They also should have added cruise.

Someone back there said the R has more top end than the RS. This is 100% backwards. The RS kills the R in high RPM's. The brakes on the RS are way better than the R.

To answer your question, the RS is smoother due to the ride by wire.

Which do I like better? The 2016 by far. It all depends on what you use it for. I commute back and forth to work as well as taking day trips the odd time to the twisties. If I was just ripping around the city, the 18 would be fine.
 

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I don’t see where anyone says the R has more top end than the RS.
As for as wind turbulence, I haven’t noticed any difference between the 675 and 765, certainly not enough to say that one is significantly better or worse than the other. I will say that if you put any screen on these bikes other than the fly screen the result is dreadful. Perhaps the mirrors makes a difference but as I’ve always had bar ends on both models I couldn’t say for sure.
I would also say that the reason for needing extra gas on the RS to get it moving has nothing to do with the ride by wire but everything to do with the way the RS is set up for more top end. The other 765s pull better low down and the 675 pulls strongly right through the range.
 

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Have any of you ridden the R and RS back to back to comment on the low throttle input and smoothness?

I'm surprised to be reading some of the comments on the 675 vs 765 models. I remember the 675 was butter smooth, I'm expecting the 765 to be the same. Once this snow melts I should finally be able to do a test ride to see for myself.
 

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@Horgh I’ve ridden both. In fact I’ve ridden (owned) a 675R and my wife currently owns a 765RS. When I was working at a dealership I put plenty of kms on the whole range, including the 660 LAMS model and several hundred kms on a 765R. Don’t take too much notice of the negative comments; they’re all superb but each has its pros and cons. Both the current R and RS models are brilliant right through the rev range. The R is just a little bit more brilliant at lower revs and the RS is just a little bit more brilliant at the top end. The S actually is a very sweet ride too. They’re all buttery smooth, handling is fantastic and no other comparable bikes on the market can come close to them for quality. I suggest you work out how you intend riding, what features you want, how much you want to spend and what you really want for your money.
 

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@Horgh I’ve ridden both. In fact I’ve ridden (owned) a 675R and my wife currently owns a 765RS. When I was working at a dealership I put plenty of kms on the whole range, including the 660 LAMS model and several hundred kms on a 765R. Don’t take too much notice of the negative comments; they’re all superb but each has its pros and cons. Both the current R and RS models are brilliant right through the rev range. The R is just a little bit more brilliant at lower revs and the RS is just a little bit more brilliant at the top end. The S actually is a very sweet ride too. They’re all buttery smooth, handling is fantastic and no other comparable bikes on the market can come close to them for quality. I suggest you work out how you intend riding, what features you want, how much you want to spend and what you really want for your money.
That's good feedback, thank you. I want to say that the money doesn't matter as much as what it's actually getting me. So, I learned early on that good suspension and brakes are what makes a bike. I've ridden budget non-adjustable setups and I've ridden tuned WP and Ohlins. I've squeezed two pot Nissins and four pot radial Brembos. But... I'm also trying to be realistic. Is the RS worth the extra money if it'll never see the track? If the suspension and brakes are that much better, then I'd say yes. But would street riding actually let me notice those differences? That's where it's a little less clear. Maybe I'll get to test ride both in the Spring to see if I can tell the difference.

Since I'm planning to have the bike dyno tuned anyway, I'm not as worried about the engine tuning of one versus the other... unless the ECU tuning differences are in ignition timing and not just fueling?
 

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No other bikes can come close to them for quality? Cmon man.. you a Triumph salesman? We're all fans here, but that's just not true at all.
 

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No other bikes can come close to them for quality? Cmon man.. you a Triumph salesman? We're all fans here, but that's just not true at all.
You shut your dirty mouth! My 2013 Street Triple R is the bestest, fastest, most beautifulest, and the most reliablest motorbike ever fashioned by gods or men.

;)
 
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