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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2009 Bonneville was recently stolen and recovered. Fortunately not much damage was done, but I haven't had a chance to ride it yet, I'm waiting on a new ignition switch. I was able to splice the wires the thief hacked so I got it to start and the motor seems ok.
I was shocked to see how easy it was to hack the ignition switch wires, I had no idea. Apart for the obvious of a disc lock, is there anything else that could be done to make the bike harder to hotwire?
 

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2003 TBS 2012 Fat Boy
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Sorry that happened, hopefully they caught the person that stole it.
I always used my fork lock when my bike was out of sight for a while. If it was at a hotel overnight, I used the disk lock also.
Unfortunately, nothing is safe anymore.
 

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It not like it was when i was young you could leave you helmet ,jacket on the bike and come back and it would still be there. Now days it would all be gone i just put a pad lock on the disc as last said a hidden kill switch is good
 

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Thats a good question i have the same model Under the seat is to hard maby behind a side cover tucked up near the seat or you could mount a key switck on the battery positive side line
 

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If the main fuse is behind the left side cover, you could remove. I remember talking to a rider who owned a '42 Indian Chief. When parking, he would remove the distributer cap and take it with him.
 

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2012 Bonneville T100
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I installed this instead of relocating my ignition:


Everything is tucked up under the tank so very difficult to hotwire.
 

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It is also worth adding a Tracker device.

I use one of these on my 2011 Bonnie which also alerts you via a phone call if the bike is even moved a bit...

I located mine under the tank so you can't easily get at it to meddle.

It has a SIM card installed which you pay a small annual fee for.

 

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A mate of mine locked his centre stand down.
If you use a disc lock, put it on the rear wheel and lock the steering - harder to lift it up and wheel away on one wheel.
Alarmed disc locks will deter some thieves.
Brake lever lock.
I’ve never seen one but have thought about a kill switch that uses a magnet. The switch could be inside side cover or even the headlight bucket with the magnet on the outside. Take it away and no start.
 

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Buy the appropriate insurance. An opportunist joy rider stole your bike. A professional rolls up with a van...two men get out..lift it into the Truck and they are gone. Disc Locks , brake lever locks, kill switches etc...will deter amateurs and joy riders only. A pro is more likely to skip anything chained to something. It takes too long to be bothered with. By passing an ignition switch is not rocket science. I am not going to explain how to do it. The proper insurance will cost less money in the long run. I have been in automotive business for 45 years...if it gets stolen...you dont want it back...it will never be the same or right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all the replies. I am hoping I don't find any hidden damage, it's been expensive already with the towing and storage fees, and a new ignition switch.
 

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I treat my Triumph like my bicycle; there's a thief on every corner (this is the UK).

Bicycles are even easier to steal. But can be made very difficult to steal. Difficult enough someone would probably just take the next nearest one. Unfortunately, that's the strategy; your bike will be passed over for another.

I rode a £2,500 electric bike all around the city, four days a week, 8,000 miles in ten months, locking every mile or two, leaving outside whilst visiting care-takers. Still got the bike.

Use at least two different forms of lock. A chain needs bolt cutters, a D-lock thieves use an adapted car jack to prise apart. So, two tools needed to be carried by thief. Unless he has a battery-powered grinder, in which case, see final tip at bottom.

Keep the chain off the ground. The thief needs the ground for leverage. 10mm or bigger links.

Keep inner space of D-lock filled with frame, wheels, etc. Thief can't get jack inside. 16mm or bigger bar.

Preferably lock to something fixed, like a lamp post. Essential for a bicycle, a bonus for a motorcycle.

I'm confident your bike won't get stolen doing above. Two locks cost maybe £40.

If you're still worried, get a vintage bike. I have lots of trouble starting mine...
 

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Bikes are stolen in the states all the time, mostly in Dem controlled cities where crime is a nightmare. However, I've used disc locks on both wheels of two different types and haven't yet had any issues. That may be because it weighs so much, lol.
 

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There are two easy places to make it harder to hot wire that come to mind.

First is to interrupt the starter motor relay wire, not the high capacity starter motor feed itself. A switch can be hidden somewhere and hotwiring the ignition switch won't work. Second is to ground out the low voltage side of the coil so there is no spark. Trouble is, they can still destroy the ignition switch trying. CANBUS is famous for not liking extra stuff in the wiring and might throw a code on some bikes.

I've seen magnetic switches used on the starter motor lockout where you carry a small magnet on your keys, hold it against the panel where the added switch is hiding, and start up. You can't use the magnetic switch on wiring that is needed for constant running.

The steering lock is easily broken, just sit on the seat and put your foot against the left grip and push hard enough. You'll find videos on line easily enough.

Lots of locks and chains are cut by thieves with the right equipment. You can get around a lot of them by using a very heavy chain that's too big for bolt cutters, just looped through the rear wheel and locked. It doesn't need to lock to a post or anything, a heavy chain is enough deterrent. Get a high quality lock where the loop is not exposed, that will be the weak point.

And finally, chase up a youtube channel called The Lock Picking Lawyer. His two minute videos of getting past any lock will destroy your faith in most locks.
 

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My 2009 Bonneville was recently stolen and recovered. Fortunately not much damage was done, but I haven't had a chance to ride it yet, I'm waiting on a new ignition switch. I was able to splice the wires the thief hacked so I got it to start and the motor seems ok.
I was shocked to see how easy it was to hack the ignition switch wires, I had no idea. Apart for the obvious of a disc lock, is there anything else that could be done to make the bike harder to hotwire?
My 2009 Bonneville was recently stolen and recovered. Fortunately not much damage was done, but I haven't had a chance to ride it yet, I'm waiting on a new ignition switch. I was able to splice the wires the thief hacked so I got it to start and the motor seems ok.
I was shocked to see how easy it was to hack the ignition switch wires, I had no idea. Apart for
My 2009 Bonneville was recently stolen and recovered. Fortunately not much damage was done, but I haven't had a chance to ride it yet, I'm waiting on a new ignition switch. I was able to splice the wires the thief hacked so I got it to start and the motor seems ok.
I was shocked to see how easy it was to hack the ignition switch wires, I had no idea. Apart for the obvious of a disc lock, is there anything else that could be done to make the bike harder to hotwire?
if you have a garage thats one way. No, rent the space in one. Live in a ground floor apt, take it inside.
modern day thieves steal a van and with 2 or 3 azzholes drive around, stop at a bike, pick it up and off they go. 2 or3 at a time.
 
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