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Getting ready to replace plugs with iridiums, and want to use anti-seize on the threads. How much do you use - e.g. - are the threads completely covered, or would running a small amount down one side of the plug suffice, so that as it is tightened, it would spread around the threads? Thank you in advance.
 

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using anti-seize

Not a good idea to use anti-seize on spark plug threads. The plug threads are used as a electrical conductor to ground. You want a good ground connection, so no anti-seize.
 

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See....

I use the copper type of anti seize because it conducts electricity.
Ditto
I worked in an engine shop and saw too many stripped plug threads from stuck plugs to ever consider not using it.... Copper or aluminum based anti-sieze will conduct electricity just as well if not better than a dry joint. Dont use too much just a dab will do yah
 

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+1 on the copper anti-sieze. Again, people are going to have their own opinions but IMO, even if you use a non-conductive anti-sieze, the plug threads will still make plenty of contact to allow current to pass though.
 

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+1 on the anti-seize; just smear a small amount INTO the threads with your finger and wipe off any excess on the unthreaded portion of the firing end with a clean rag. I've been doing it on all my plugs for years; they come out much easier.------James.
 

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just a smear

Just a smear. Neglect to use it and one day, the thread will wind out with the plug....

To those who think that a lubricated plug won't conduct electricity, no offense meant and all that, but I've never heard so much pants in all my life! Or maybe American electricity isn't as good as English, ho ho.
 

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pants

pants? Is that like B#ll $h!#
Yes, a very good approximation.
The basic expression 'pants' may be enhanced thus;

What a load of frilly big ladies old pants, etc etc.....

you can sort of free style with it.

Like; Gordon Brown thinks he has just saved the world, what utter pants.

Like; what do you think of gold Wings?
Pants.

These are English pants, be aware. American pants=trousers, unless I am mistaken.
English pants can equate to panties AND jockies, paradoxically.
What a minefield!
 

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Controversial Allright !

Lets face it, how many times over the life of our engines are we going to interfere with the plugs? In this day and age it is not unusual to get 10,000 miles out of quality plugs and most riders will come to grips pretty quickly when plug failure is evident. If the plugs were replaced with a lick of common sense and we all know that we are screwing steel into aluminium then the obvious precautions are needed. Given the preponderance of aluminium heads out there spark plug manufacturers increased the length of the threaded portion many years ago. The thread on the plug is the same length as the thread in the cylinder head. This gives upwards of an inch of threaded grip. For this to fail it has to be abused, that is, tightend up to the point of ridiculousness. Steel into aluminium. New plugs come fitted with a crush washer/sealer it is so evident when torqueing up a new plug as to when the washer has crushed, just a small amount of torque is then needed to tighten the plug. No need for anti sieze or any type of 'lube' if common sense prevails.
 

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Lets face it, how many times over the life of our engines are we going to interfere with the plugs? In this day and age it is not unusual to get 10,000 miles out of quality plugs and most riders will come to grips pretty quickly when plug failure is evident. If the plugs were replaced with a lick of common sense and we all know that we are screwing steel into aluminium then the obvious precautions are needed. Given the preponderance of aluminium heads out there spark plug manufacturers increased the length of the threaded portion many years ago. The thread on the plug is the same length as the thread in the cylinder head. This gives upwards of an inch of threaded grip. For this to fail it has to be abused, that is, tightened up to the point of ridiculousness. Steel into aluminium. New plugs come fitted with a crush washer/sealer it is so evident when torquing up a new plug as to when the washer has crushed, just a small amount of torque is then needed to tighten the plug. No need for anti seize or any type of 'lube' if common sense prevails.
You make a good point; some folks DO draw 'em down way too tight. A barrel of anti-seize won't prevent buggered-up threads in these cases. Since the plugs do stay in place for longer periods of time due to modern plug designs, and since most cylinder heads are aluminum and the plugs are steel; the problem lies in dissimilar metal (galvanic) corrosion between the two surfaces, especially at elevated temperatures. This tiny bit of corrosion is enough to require a high breakout torque and will sometimes damage the threads on removal; this is what anti-seize compound is designed to prevent.

I'm not an engineer; I'm speaking from working experience. In my line of work, I use it on screw pipe unions at the mating surfaces, and on pipe flange stud bolts. These may sit for years without being disturbed; I've personaly dismantled flanges where the stud bolts were easy to break out (with end wrenches) after 30-40 years in service. Some mechanics don't like to use it because it's messy; their stud bolts required a hacksaw (in flamable enviroments like refineries) or a cutting torch (where it's safer) to remove them. Hell, I even use it on the wheel lug nuts of my truck; it makes the flat tire changes on the side of the road a snap to do. If there are engineers out there that care to weigh in on the subject, I'd like to hear your thoughts on this.----James.
 

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Lets face it, how many times over the life of our engines are we going to interfere with the plugs? In this day and age it is not unusual to get 10,000 miles out of quality plugs and most riders will come to grips pretty quickly when plug failure is evident. If the plugs were replaced with a lick of common sense and we all know that we are screwing steel into aluminium then the obvious precautions are needed. Given the preponderance of aluminium heads out there spark plug manufacturers increased the length of the threaded portion many years ago. The thread on the plug is the same length as the thread in the cylinder head. This gives upwards of an inch of threaded grip. For this to fail it has to be abused, that is, tightend up to the point of ridiculousness. Steel into aluminium. New plugs come fitted with a crush washer/sealer it is so evident when torqueing up a new plug as to when the washer has crushed, just a small amount of torque is then needed to tighten the plug. No need for anti sieze or any type of 'lube' if common sense prevails.
Actually its corrosion, spalling and build up of carbon that often damage the threads in my experience. How many here have had trouble removing the plugs that the factory installed to correct torque? Quite a few - at least one of mine came out with some of the thread from the head attached.

I'm not saying people dont overtighten them and that does cause a lot of damage, but, its not the only source - your choice but use a touch of anti seize and you will avoid all of that. By the way - my plugs come out every 12 months at least as I have to winterize.
 

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Before you put anti seize on the plugs, I'll relate a problem I had last summer. I changed the plugs and as usual smeared anti seize on them as I always have. (My bike has 37,000 miles on it so I've changed the plugs a few times) I use a Permatex variety, gray in color. Maybe it's an aluminum compound?
I started having a starting problem. The bike would crank and crank. I'd hit it with starter fluid and it would start. After it was warm, it would start easily. When cold, it started with difficulty, only with ether.
I started checking things, coils, etc. I wanted to check spark strength so I pulled a plug out and cleaned an area to ground the plug and the dam bike started right off! With only 2 plugs in the bike!! It wouldn't come close to firing with 3!!
I talked to a friend that owns an auto repair shop and he said cool it with the anti seize. Some of his trade magazines warned about the anti seize and ground problems.
I bought new plugs, and a thin, long bottle brush and cleaned the threads in the head. I installed the new plugs and the bike starts just fine.
I can't comment on other brands of never seize but the one I used caused me a lot of grief, and I attribute my problem directly to the never seize. FYI.
 
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