Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of October's Bike of the Month Challenge!
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've searched through the threads in the T3 forum and the others without finding an answer to this, so now I'll ask.

In trying to adjust the chain on my '94 Sprint 900, I discovered that I could not find an "L" shaped Allen wrench to move the eccentric adjuster. That meant the use of a 12mm hex head on the end of my ratchet but that doesn't quite fit under the muffler (silencer). Now comes the fun. I removed the bolt from the rear bracket of the muffler but this didn't allow enough movement to properly fit in the hex head and ratchet. I loosened the clamp at what should be the end of the muffler (according to the diagram in my service manual) but the muffler won't move. I can put an extension on the ratchet to gain a bit more clearance, but it is still going in at an angle and is chewing up te edge of the fitting in the eccentric. Am I missing something in trying to remove the muffler...besides the use of a rubber mallet and brute force (of which I have precious little)? Does anyone know of a tool company that makes a 12mm "L" shaped Allen wrench?

Oh! And am I relegated to asking someone to hold a wrench to one adjuster as I move the other since moving one causes the other to move as well, thereby screwing up my adjustment? Is there some secret way of making sure that the left adjuster stays in place when I move the right adjuster? I tried gently tightening the pinch bolt on one side but then neither adjuster will move.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16,670 Posts
I bought my 12mm Allen wrenches off eBay. They're Italian, I want to say they're made by Beta Tools?

Muffler-wise, it's brute force combined with just enough finesse to keep from capsizing the bike. IIRC, it's likely to break free suddenly.

As far as the actual adjustment goes, I'm not sure what to say. A lot of it is getting it by feel. Basically, loosen both pinch bolts, then tighten them *very* lightly. (Or don't loosen them all the way, but I find loosen/re-tighten to be easier.) You want just enough drag that the adjusters won't move on their own, but not so much drag that turning them with the Allen wrench will be jerky.

Next, adjust the chain with the Allen wrench in the left adjuster. (It's not super-critical. You want an inch and a half of play at the tightest point on the chain, measured halfway between sprockets on the bottom run of the chain. An inch and three quarters is better than an inch and a quarter.) When the chain slack is properly adjusted, tighten the left pinch bolt down by hand just snug. Look at the indicator mark on the eccentric and note its position in relation to the index marks on the swingarm. You'll want to move the right eccentric to the same relative position, then snug the right pinch bolt down by hand. *It is very important to remember to count index marks from the front or rear of the bike, not from right or left!* Some people with dyslexic tendencies might be prone to getting that bit wrong...

Once both adjusters are snug, check the chain again. If it's no longer at spec, see if you can get it there by loosening the left adjuster only, opening the right pinch bolt as needed, grudgingly, a sixteenth of a turn at a time. When the chain is right, tighten the left first (just snug), make sure the marks line up for both sides, snug the right, then torque both pinch bolts to spec.

HTH,
-Kit
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,958 Posts
once the pinch bolts are slackened it ought to be easy to rotate the eccentrics. A common problem is for the steel bush in the brake caliper mounting plate to seize and stop it all from moving. You would need to take the wheel out, take the caliper & torque arm off the plate and push the centre bush out for a clean up and grease.

You should be able to get a 12mm hex key at any half decent tool shop, if it is too long - take a grinder to it. If you can cut it with a hacksaw, its made of rubbish metal.

The silencers will rust onto the pipes in time, plus-gas is a good releasing lubricant to free them off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
...here we go again

Thanks for the info guys. It's morning and I'm off to a better than half decent tool store (I was already out to a half decent one and they didn't have the wrench either). I should be riding this p.m. before the next round of three day showers arrive. Ever notice sometimes how owning a motorcycle (or two, three...) makes us wonder if we don't have some hidden masochistic tendencies? Just wondering...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
414 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
...red glow in the morning...

And don't worry if you see a red glow from the North. That will just be my face after my beginners mistake. You would think that after some 30 odd years I would have learned to read a manual more carefully or, better yet, remember what I've done on other bikes. Looking at the manual this a.m., I noticed a section a bit further along , regarding wheel alignment that said, as noted by Sailfish... loosen the d$%n axle bolts. The alignment process works beatifully once the parts are no longer locked together. Oh well, I paid for my sin by having to spend part of the previous afternoon working in my uninsulated, 35 degree C. garage and then missing a nice ride in this morning's beautiful weather (to be followed by 4 days of rain according to the weatherman). Oh well, I got out for a bit in the p.m. with my well-adjusted, straight tracking bike and reminded myself to never take on simple tasks when I'm too tired. Thanks again guys.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top