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Discussion Starter #1
After a year and a half of pure satisfaction with my 06 T-100 I have given in to the "MOD BUG". My Racetech S4105 emulators and .90kg springs arrived last night. This will be the first 'mod' done to the bike other than the Air injection removal it had when I bought it. If there are any light weight riders (below 150lb) with Racetech emu's and springs out there that wouldn't mind sharing how they set theirs up (spacer length, hole sizes, damper adjustment, final wt. fork oil, etc.)and their results, I'd like to hear from you. I'd like to soften up the ride a bit. Most of my riding is around town and my stock suspension jolts pretty hard over sharp bumps. I don't want the handling to suffer by going too soft for the times I do get into the twisties. Thanks,
Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I like it!

I installed the Racetech emulators and springs today. It took me a lot longer than I thought it would. I couldn't get the allen bolts out of the damper tubes. The tubes would spin inside the forks. I tried a hand impact, 3/8 drive pneumatic (albiet a weak one) with no luck. I jammed a broom stick into the top of the damper tube and cinched it into the tube with a ratcheting tie down strap to hold as much pressure as I could. No good. I tried reassembliing the forks with more preload on the springs. Nada. Finally wound up taking it to a bike shop that had a bigger impact wrench and they had to wrestle with it a bit too but finally got them out. Got home, drilled the new holes, cut the spacers, put that puppy together and went for a ride on one of the roughest streets I frequently ride on. The front end sits higher in all phases of operation and doesn't dive as much under braking. The front forks with stock set up had a lot more sag. They would extend under acceleration and compress when I shut off the throttle. Seems like that would translate to a cushy ride but that wasn't the case. Sharp bumps were transmitted straight up to the bars like the forks were rigid. The emulators do a better job of absorbing the harsh bumbs but are not as cushy on the gentler stuff. I followed Racetech's advice and used 2 turns on the valve adjuster and went with 15 wt oil. I've read post from heavier guys that are using the same set up. Next fork oil change I might try a lighter oil or back off a half turn on the valves. There is very little rocking now when transitioning from acceleration to decelaration and back. The bike stays nearly level the whole time. I don't know what the stock set up would have been like if I had set it up for the same sag and gone to lighter oil. Guess I never will now. I going to wait until my next trip to the Hill Country twisties before I decide if they are worth the money and effort but I think I'm going to like them. If you are considering doing this, you need a good impact, a drill and some bits (I used a #40 split point to pilot hole the damper tubes and opened them up sith a step drill bit), and a 8mm or 5/16 allen socket with about a 2" reach to access the allen bolts. Sears didn't have one long enough so I had to put my allen bit in a 1/4" drive 5/16" socket that would fit in the hole and a 1/4" to 3/8" adapter to connect to the impact to get to them. Luckily I took that set up with me to the shop because they didn't have one to reach either.
 

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Niceley done - dismantling forks can be a beeyotch. I had to resort to a decent size air impact wrench myself to rebuild the forks on some of my other bikes after going through exactly what you went through. Definitley a handy tool to have around.

Suspension upgrades are probably the biggest smile / dollar upgrades you can do - especially the front forks. Fairly inexpensive for huge gains.

Watch it though - that's what I did, and shortly after that you start asking yourself "what about removing this airbox then?". Not that there's anything wrong with that!
 

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Jimmy,

You say the front end sits higher with the new springs, so do you have the same amount of sag as with the stock, or much less? I', not an expert, but I understand that you need to have about 25mm of sag when you just sit on the bike. If you have less, that would account for the harsh ride - you would need to adjust the preload (lessen it) to sort this.

Or possibly the spring rate is too stiff for your weight??

Dave
 

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Discussion Starter #5
When I cut the spacers, I went with the longest that Racetech recommended thinking I'd probably have to cut more. The pre-load appears to be just a bit too much. From what I can guess at by myself with my calibrated eyeball, I'm a bit less than a 1/4" too stiff. I have to wait to get some help to balance and measure the sag. When I get an accurate read, I'll make adjustments and report back.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
follow-up

I took another measurement after a ride this morning. According to my conversion factor for 25mm to 35mm, the "street" range for sag is between .984" and 1.38". Mine is checking at 1" so is at the stiff end of that range. I'm going to ride it that way. I don't think I'd gain enough by going softer to justify the extra work (can you say lazy?)and this will be more in line if I choose to ride aggressively in the twisties as the "track" range is from .787" to 1.18" so I'm at the soft end of that range..
Propforward, I hear the Thruxton caps have adjustable pre-load. Is that true? Maybe that could be my answer and "next MOD". Don't get me started on what else I would like to do. I have to eat.
 
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