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Discussion Starter #1
Maybe Ohlins can get away with a gold reservoir on a shock absorber but even their gold forks are hideous.

If you disagree please post a picture of a bike you think looks better with gold forks than black. Case in point for me, the scrambler XC vs. XE.

NC
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Maybe Ohlins can get away with a gold reservoir on a shock absorber but even their gold forks are hideous.

If you disagree please post a picture of a bike you think looks better with gold forks than black. Case in point for me, the scrambler XC vs. XE.

NC
View attachment 718862
They are not ohlins forks on the scrambler, they're Shows BPF same as on my Thruxton R.

Although they've obviously anodised gold to mimic ohlins, but I agree on a modern classic bike they should at least offer a black option though it would probably mean more expense at the manufacturing stage to anodise two colours.

Having the traditional gold and yellow springs I suppose is a way of people being able to instantly recognise that You've paid out extra for the the highest spec model.
Personally I prefer the gold but I understand that lot of people don't like it.
 

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Well... 'hate' is too strong a word, methinks.
I can appreciate the aesthetics, but i choose otherwise.
But mainly I can't be arsed with all the cleaning and black forks look so much better with slate dust on 'em!

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Yea hate would be a stretch, I try to save that for rival sports teams. But the gold forks look out of place to me, I suppose if they tie in aesthetically somehow then they'd look OK/good but for the most part, at least in my mind, they look like replacements and one had to settle on what was available.
 

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Yup +1, I dont hate them, but if I could choose I'd have black forks on my 05 speedy over the gold ones any day. Like why do they do that? Everything is black except for the front forks :(

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Maybe to offset the nissin calipers which are painted in another shade of gold.

Why did you have to bring this up? Now I will need to get the calipers coated...

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I could care less about the color of the forks. What does matter to me is that they do their job well.

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Hate was a strong word but gold just doesn't match any part of the bike on the scrambler or any other. Ducati does this as well and way too often.

NC
 

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I think it depends on the type of the bike, gold can look good on sports bikes or something that's got fairly modern styling but I'm not to keen on the gold forks on a retro styled machine.
718898

Looking good (y)

718899


mmmh, nice (y)

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Oh dear! :sick:
 

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Discussion Starter #13

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Agree on the Daytona, but not the second bike and again we agree on the Scrambler.

NC
Yeah I was having a bit of a dig at the Triumph Scambler, I think they got that one completely wrong with or without gold forks. There are some riders on here that don't agree with me, then everyone's got their own personal tastes (y)
 

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From an artist's perspective, it's less about the bike they're on than the color clashing. Green and yellow, fine. Red/yellow, white, black...hell, even purple and yellow...okay.
Blue and yellow? No, just...no. It's disharmonious: that's basic color theory science, not just personal opinion (although it's also that). Maybe they were going with jolting anyone who looks at it into really, REALLY noticing it, but that's also not how the brain reacts. I wouldn't be surprised if the sales numbers for that color combo take a hit compared to other color options.
The only reasoning I can think of for why someone in the design dept might have thought that was a good idea is if they thought gold was in the orange family, to which I say...oh, honey. It's not. It's REALLY not.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
As a photographer I know that blue and yellow are as opposite from one another as two colors can be although my terminology may be slightly off. I remember early Husaberg and current Husqvarna bikes in blue/yellow/white that look killer but that is where a personal preference exceeds what may be naturally pleasing to the eye. And the worst color combination to me is red/yellow. That just doesn't work; for me.

https://www.reddit.com/r/cars/comments/xg9lr

Regarding gold tone anything, I think it has to do with a sense of prestige/eliteness/wealth that real gold represents. I cannot imagine any reason other than that for having something appear to be gold when it isn't. So if gold is present in other forms on a bike like that Daytona or last years BMW R1200GS in black with some yellow/gold black trim I think the forks look okay. But as you mentioned, just adding them for branding sake (hint Ohlins) or a false sense of status doesn't make sense visually.

If they want to add some bling factor, maybe a black chrome look would work. Now I'll probably catch hell for that one . . . LOL.

NC


From an artist's perspective, it's less about the bike they're on than the color clashing. Green and yellow, fine. Red/yellow, white, black...hell, even purple and yellow...okay.
Blue and yellow? No, just...no. It's disharmonious: that's basic color theory science, not just personal opinion (although it's also that). Maybe they were going with jolting anyone who looks at it into really, REALLY noticing it, but that's also not how the brain reacts. I wouldn't be surprised if the sales numbers for that color combo take a hit compared to other color options.
The only reasoning I can think of for why someone in the design dept might have thought that was a good idea is if they thought gold was in the orange family, to which I say...oh, honey. It's not. It's REALLY not.
 

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Fun discussion here.
The usage of color (in context of material/finish, shape and quantity) is part of the design palette, the impact/success of the design intent becomes the responsibility of the designer, trying to meet the target market and probably a color/material strategy to support a hierarchy of the product portfolio (i.e. good/better/best or different product categories). In today's consumer products (including auto and bikes), color is but one element in a much expanded design palette. Color is influenced with the usage of authentic materials, texture mapping, new paint finishes, alternate manufacturing processes (i.e. in-mold decorating, hydro-forming, 3D printing, etc.), lighting effects, etc. We are in a evolutionary design period as newer technologies, recalibrated user needs, sustainability, etc. will direct new directions for bikes in the future.
But with that said, let's get back to the Gold Fork discussion (anodized gold, NOT "yellow"). I'm fine with the usage of the anodized gold fork on the Daytona because the usage here is thematic and used tastefully/complementary on the bike. The metallic gold is judiciously used on the wheels, rotor carriers, brake calipers and fork, visually focusing on the strength of the gold accented wheel subsystem. The metallic gold is also used very sparingly for the graphic branding on the faring, tank and tail, and effectively helps tie the theme together, coordinated on the entire bike. Quite successful here (just like the beautiful black and gold livery JPS Lotus F1 from the 70-80s).
The gold fork examples of the white Street Triple (Bike #2) and the Scrambler doesn't work for me as they are too isolated/pasted on and lack any continuity nor flatters the bike as an accent color (looks "spotty" at best).
And the complementary color wheel opposites of blue and yellow actually looks great when used correctly, the classic Team Penske Sonoco Can Am Porsche 917-30 and Indy McLaren M16 are timeless beauties.
But ultimately, there are no set rules and we can all enjoy the diversity (or just paint over what you don't like)!
 

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Touche, I stand corrected; it's been over 45 years since my Basic Design class; blame it on brain fade!
The complementary relationship of blue and orange will fatigue the heck out of your retinal receptors, unrelenting visual vibration.
The blue and yellow relationship makes a better pairing as a secondary complementary relationship. It's still pretty bold but not overly so; a fairly common palette (think Cub Scout uniform or Lapiz/Gold jewelry).
Thanks again for pointing out the oversight; I'll work on being more accurate in the future.
 
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