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Thats quite a piece of work with a hydraulic clutch operation.Interesting to look around and draw in the rivet counters for criticism !.Must have been fun getting the wider tyre in that swing arm gap though
 

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More interested in the hydraulic clutch. Is that an external slave cylinder that operates the normal 3-ball mechanism?
I'm fitting a hydralic system to my '71 Bonneville... I bought it in the States a while back and will install it during the re-build that currently under way. This one uses a custom made short stroke slave cylinder that fits in place of the 3-ball thing. It's a straight swap with no mods needed so it can be changed back at any time. Wasn't cheap, though :(
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok. All of the mods were carried out in 1979/1980 other than the cycle speedo and ceramic coated exhausts.

The hydraulic clutch uses a small bore master cylinder and a piston inside the slave. The piston pushes a rod, which pushes the 3-ball mechanism down (it works the same both ways, pull up or push down). The slave just screws into the threads at the top of the gearbox, where the cable goes in. No mods required. I think it came from Anglo bike in the UK. That coupled with Norton Dominator clutch springs and one of the first QPD belt drives that Ozzie made (runs dry) complete that part of the setup. The engine is 11.2:1 with Piper full race cams and no clutch slippage!

The front brake is due to the fact that it pi$$es down in the UK. I bought the bike in 1977 from Manchester (aka 'The Rainy City') and as I was approaching some traffic lights, they decided to turn red. The rain on the chrome disk had a different idea to the 'stop' signal and I just shot right through (brown stain on the A556). Sooo, off came the chrome and in came drilled holes for cooling and slots for water dissipation. I also managed to pick up another fork leg and disk. A change of retaining bolt to incorporate the new disk was needed. It was at the same time that I bought the hydraulic clutch, so I also purchased a suitable master cylinder for twin disks (to match the clutch master), a calliper and a cover. The brakes work well dry or wet and have pretty good feel too.

There are also a few more mods...
Mark
 

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And you're still riding the same bike Mark? I think that's great. I wish I'd kept mine from way back. How many miles and what kinds of issues have you had over all those years?
 

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Venhill make a similar clutch conversion and LP williams make the psp type that replaces the internal clover leaf .
 

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Discussion Starter #8
And you're still riding the same bike Mark? I think that's great. I wish I'd kept mine from way back. How many miles and what kinds of issues have you had over all those years?
How many miles? No idea. A lot! If it can be measured in worn out parts, then I have replaced 4 or 5 speedo drives and two speedos over the years (as well as the usual chains, carbs, pads, shoes and tyres). I haven't used the speedo for years as that one gave up the ghost too. All of the last 8(?) MOT's have the same mileage!

Issues? None at all.
The crank was dynamically balanced and I weighed and matched both sides of the engine (pistons, con rods, push rods, etc, etc) to within 0.001gram. It keeps the vibration right down and I think that causes less problems elsewhere.
The other thing that you usually read about when people have problems is the electricals. It has Piranha ignition, 6 blade fuse conversion, solid-state reg/rec and I made my own wiring harness. All unnecessary joints were missed out. All other connectors were crimped, soldered, heat shrink and then silicone covered. This year I was out on two occasions when the rain actually stopped the traffic, it was that heavy. My bike didn't miss a beat. However, I remember a long time ago that I did blow a back light bulb... Even that has been modded. I turned a bulb holder through 90 degrees (so that it sits in the lens sideways). That gave enough room to rubber mount the holder inside the lens. So even though the light is at the top of the sissy, it doesn't get affected by vibration.
The headlight is operated via a relay inside the shell. I am convinced that the lighter load inside the switch avoids possible corrosion (I may be wrong, but so far all is clean!).

I change the oil regularly, plus have the spin-off filter. It also has RetroRods patent crank breather (as well as breathers to the rockers and oil filler cap). No oil leaks at all.

As it says in the article, I have plugs and fuses. There are also some tools: Adjustable spanner, allen keys and a multi-tool. The only time I have ever needed anything was at a classic meet when another Triumph owner couldn't get his bike started.

Mark
 

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Hey Mark,i see you have not joined my snapped crankshaft club then.Good use of allen fixings on that one.Might make me pinch a few ideas.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Hey Mark,i see you have not joined my snapped crankshaft club then.Good use of allen fixings on that one.Might make me pinch a few ideas.
Nope, no snapped crank. Though the big end went 2 weeks after I bought it and needed a regrind. That was because the PO hadn't changed his oil (ever) and the sludge tube was solid.
I like allen stuff, I think they look nice and what's more, allen keys take up less space than a socket set!

Thank's GPZ.

Mark
 

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That king and queen seat is a collectible all by itself. I have to agree that it is refreshing to see someone has hung onto their bike all these years rather than most of us who whine about wishing we still had our old bikes.

How old is that rear tire? Do they still make motorcycle tires with raised white letters?

Hope you get to enjoy it for another 37 years.

regards,
Rob
 

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tyre pen?

That's what I used to do. In fact, I think that it was just a paint pen. It possibly did something to the rubber that is dangerous, but who cared?
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
No, not a tyre pen. The K181 had raised lettering (you can see it better in this link) (not my tyre by the way, just a piccy off the internet). http://www.jockeyjournal.com/forum/attachment.php?attachmentid=23328&d=1197757998

The tyre is the last one of several that I bought and kept in a cool dark place. I had a comment (not advisory) at it's last mot, that it was near the wear limit, so I will have to find something else to fit. It wasn't easy finding a tyre to fit in the first place and the K181 has less than 2mm either side to play with!
It is a 5.10x16, as that is actually slimmer than the 5.00. So, if anyone knows of a nice 16" tyre that would fit, I would really like to know!

Mark

ps: Here is a sneak preview of my '72 that I bought in 1980.


I suppose that shows I don't like getting rid of stuff. But then again, if I didn't, I would still be the proud owner af a Matchless G12, two Sunbeam S8s, a 500 Speed Twin and a Kawasaki KH250...
 

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Several of the tire manuf websites have tables with full dimensions for their tires. Probably worth a look.

regards,
Rob
 
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