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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been wanting to ride to work on my 2007 Bonneville T100, but there is no covered parking and it is over 100 degrees now here in Texas. I am not sure which is worse for the finish, the hot sun or the bird droppings from the trees if I were to get lucky enough to park in the shade.

Perhaps I am being too picky about keeping my Bonneville shiny and clean, but I thought that I might cover it while at work. So today I bought one of Triumph's All Weather Covers. I am very pleased with the quality and fit, but it is not as easy to put on and take off as I thought it would be. I am mostly concerned about scratching the bike, and of course, I have to adjust the mirrors each time.

I am hoping that some of you might be able to offer some tips and tricks on the best way to install it on the bike. Any help would be appreciated.
 

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I have a Covercraft

and what I do is locate the logo (which lines up with the headlight) and start in the front. First I cover the tank, seat and rear mudguard with an old flannel sheet remnant to avoid any scratches.
Pull the cover over and around the mirrors and bars and just get it started about halfway down the front wheel.
Now reach up inside the little "canopy" you've created and find the other end of the elastic. Pull this back to the tail light and over the rear turn signals.
This is usually where I make some minor straightening adjustments and then I just work my way around the bike, gently pulling the elastic clear of all the obstacles until she's on.
If it's very windy, I'll even attach the cinch strap underneath.
I've also gotten into the habit of waiting at least an hour for things to cool down to avoid burning the cover or leaving hideous deposits on the side covers.
So far, I havent had to adjust my mirrors at all, and as terrible as this all sounds, I can usually do it in about 2 minutes (even in the dark).Oh yeah, if you're parking it on asphalt, it's a good idea to keep a small piece of plywood to go under the kickstand. The Arizona sun can turn that into chewing gum and the stand will sink and the bike will fall.
Hope this helps. If anyone has any better techniques, please post up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Good advice

Thanks for the tips, Clyde. I had not even thought about the side stand issue, but luckily, the parking lot is concrete.

I am also concerned about covering the bike as soon as I stop riding, but the Triumph cover does have heat resistant panels for the exhaust. As you mention, though, it might be hard to keep other portions of the cover from touching the hot parts while installing the cover.

Does anyone else have any additional advice or experience with this?
 

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Andy Strapz is the way to go

An Australian company,- ANDY STRAPZ -makes covers that only cover the top part of the bike so can be put on without touching the hot parts straight after you stop. Held on pretty simply and work. Maybe give them a go.
 

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Bike cover

It all depends on where you park but, one of those inexpensive picknic canopies you find at Wallyworld is a good solution, if you're on asphalt, you can get some case hardened nails and anchor the feet with those, if on grass, get four screw in pet anchors, run a line from those to the top of the leg and tie it off. they are pretty sturdy, will last a couple of seasons then a new top is cheap.
That, coupled with a lightweight throw over cover will keep the bike sparkling new without the hassle of one of those triumph all weather covers.

http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=5044016

Not sure how that would work at your job, but you might get permission to use it there.
 

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An Australian company,- ANDY STRAPZ -makes covers that only cover the top part of the bike so can be put on without touching the hot parts straight after you stop. Held on pretty simply and work. Maybe give them a go.
I was using a half-cover at work until this year, when the hospital opened a parking garage with motorcycle spaces, perfect!

The half-cover takes care of most of the parts you want covered, and it's easy to keep it off the headers; it doesn't reach the silencers. I did melt a hole or two in it--repaired with duct tape--when I wasn't being careful.

The one that I bought came with its own fanny pack, very handy. It's a Nelson-Rigg.
 

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I used this for two years to keep the snow and rain mostly off my bike. It worked well, and was only $100.



Jim :cool:
 
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