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Why do you need an extension cord? If you are mounting tires roll it to the compressor. If you need something else buy a longer air hose.
 

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Thruxton 1200 R , 900 , KTM Duke 390 , Honda NSR 125 , SWM 124
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I'm not sure this is as easy as some think. I had experience recently where I could not seat the beads on two scooter tyres. You cannot get enough air in through the empty valve stems using an average domestic compressor. Some of the tyre shops use a compressed air "bomb" which shoots sufficient air in between the rim and bead and I had to resort to this. Possibly its easier with bigger tyres but you may wish to bite the bullet once the tyre is on the rim and get a professional to set the bead. Just my two cents worth.
If using an air cannon remember to brace the wheel in position or risk it flying across the workshop ! Worst case I had was a balloon tyre from a lawn tractor where the new tyre had been stored in a stack on its side . The air cannon seated the bead but then the shape of the tyre pulled it back off again . Had to run an air line to the valve and use the air cannon simultaneously .
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Well everything is on its way now, so I'll see if it all works or not one way or another!

Predictably, I am now $500 lighter in the pocket (that's buying levers, balancing stand etc as well!), which works out at a payback period of 12 tyres, or about 48,000km! (based on 2 back to one front) - or about 12-18 months (based on recent use).

So probably not the best economics, but at least I'll have the satisfaction of being fully self-sufficient for servicing, and shouldn't have to go anywhere near another ape (sorry, professional motorcycle technician!) again :)

Electrically I don’t think you’re ok.
With the motor rated at 2200w and using 230v as your supply voltage( which is pretty spot on: unless you have a 500kv transformer 25 meters away) you’ll be drawing 9.6 amps as your best scenario.
The longer the extension lead, the more voltage drop you’ll have. When your volts drop your current will increase. Hence the reason a 10 amp cord ain’t recommended.
Yes, that's pretty much where I ended up too! The compressor I went for is only 0.75hp, which I make about 500W, and a 2.4A draw at 230V, so hopefully within the range of the 10A power lead.

Why do you need an extension cord? If you are mounting tires roll it to the compressor. If you need something else buy a longer air hose.
All the plugs are inside the house - inside would be OK for the bike tyre (so long as the missus is out!), but any other jobs like airbrushing, using a cleaning gun, or even pumping up the car tyres would need the extension.
 

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I’ve used ether and would NOT recommend it. I’ve also used carb cleaner in dire straight....also wouldn’t recommend. As I posted before....I’ve mounted countless tires and beads with success on rims of all types. You just have to be resourceful. If the bead isn’t making contact with the rim on both sides it’s never going to happen. Go slow, be patient, and you’ll get it.
 

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For what it’s worth Kdxandy, I took a set of wheels for my first set of tires in my Ducati 800SS to a shop about 6 years ago. These rims were mint, I kept them clean and waxed 😎 , I removed debris and chain goo after every ride or track weekend. The shop had a malfunction in the bead breaker and took a chunk out of the wheel and ruined the paint. Guy came out and just said....”sorry”...That was the last time I let someone else mount a tire for me. Just a tip. There are bead breaker spoons you might want to add to your list. I don’t own one but the look like they work perfect. I cut the tire off from the soft spot in the sidewall and use a 5lbs sledge and a small block of wood. If you work it slow you can break the bead in a minute or so. Also a tip, I wrap my spoons, or irons in electrical tape or a small slice of garden hose where it makes contact with the rim. But it does feel somewhat ok when you make the mistake rather than someone else. Have fun. My father calls it “intimate knowledge of operation” the more you do or know about what you ride, the more you’ll know and understand about these wonderful machines we are all somewhat obsessed with.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
I got a pair of these Motion Pro beadbreakers after watching an MC Garage vid on youtube - they looked pretty efficient


Its a good milestone - tyre changes were the last thing I still went to a shop for :)
 

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Also get 2- sets of rim protectors (or more)! Their cheap and, have enough of them to never have to stick a tire spoon against the rim itself. I agree with @DucDucGoose, no way I’m letting some 16 year old kid at the shop wreak my nice black wheels. Cause certainly the 20 veteran/ master mechanic isn’t going to be the one busting tires.. Most shops have some sort of “minimum damage clause” too, so unless they completely destroy your wheel, your not getting compensation for scratched rims.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Also get 2- sets of rim protectors (or more)! Their cheap and, have enough of them to never have to stick a tire spoon against the rim itself. I agree with @DucDucGoose, no way I’m letting some 16 year old kid at the shop wreak my nice black wheels. Cause certainly the 20 veteran/ master mechanic isn’t going to be the one busting tires.. Most shops have some sort of “minimum damage clause” too, so unless they completely destroy your wheel, your not getting compensation for scratched rims.
(y) Check! 2 pairs in the post
(Also 2 longer tyre levers to go with the bead breakers, a pack of 60 x 7g weights, a balancing stand and a valve core tool !)
 

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Discussion Starter #49
BTW, has anyone tried using a g-clamp to break the bead? Seems a plausible option...
 

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Years ago I used to use an old Quarry vice for bead breaking , still in use if very old belongs in a museum
 

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BTW, has anyone tried using a g-clamp to break the bead? Seems a plausible option...
I have used a C-clamp to break beads many times. Then I bought a regular bead breaking leverage unit.
Rim protectors are great. I also recommend those little deals that hold the bead down in the wheel cavity [spoke wheels] while spooning on the tire.
 
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