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Not sure about the spec, looks like the metric to imperial conversion matches up (which is often cause for confusion here!). All I know is that compared to the other low flow 12V compressors I had used this one works well, the chuck clamps well, and the beads seated in no time, both front and rear tires.
 

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According to the NEMA electrical code 10 amps only requires a 16 gauge wire, but that does not take in to account long distance one might encounter from the breaker to the end user. I also does not account for inrush in startup. You should not exceed 80% of the wire and breakers rated amps. Also if you encounter some voltage drop, the amps go up. Ohms law = volts X Amps = Watts applies. If you loose VOLTAGE due to resistance [including bad connections] the AMPS go up. WATTAGE always remains constant. If you use 240 instead of 120, you can run twice the power on the same wire size. ...J.D.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Here's what I've gone for... selected on basis that it's compact and portable, and claims to be quiet. Should run OK off an extension lead and (hopefully!) give enough juice to seat tyres, run an airbrush and a hobby size sandblaster...

751202
 

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Not sure if this has already been said but I'll state it anyway.
Take a ratchet tie down or normal cycle tie down and go around the circumference of the tire. Tighten as much as possible while watching the bead push to the outer rim area. Remove the valve core and hit it with all the air you have. Watch for the bead to "pop". Quickly put the valve core back in and remove the tie down. Finish filling tire.
Good to go on any tubeless cycle, ATV and even lawn tractor tires.
 

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Agreed. Popping a tire bead is not rocket science. As mentioned, a simple strap around the tire usually does the trick. Especially on a tire this small. ...J.D.
 

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1998 T595 Daytona 2014 Kawasaki Ninja1000ABS
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Here's what I've gone for... selected on basis that it's compact and portable, and claims to be quiet. Should run OK off an extension lead and (hopefully!) give enough juice to seat tyres, run an airbrush and a hobby size sandblaster...

View attachment 751202
That's similar to my Makita small compressor. The smaller the compressor, the louder they are. Mine is rather loud. You'll find out how loud this is. As far as using for other applications, you need to go by the requirements of the tool, accessory relating to how many L/min and at what pressure is needed. Good luck. They come in handy.
 

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I tend to avoid the oilless compressors. I had one and a friend did as well. We both had reliability issues with them. I have two compressors. The big one I mentioned earlier, and a small Hitachi "portable". Yes it has a handle on it but it ain't no light wieght. It has a real piston and cylinder and two little horizontal tanks. I use it mainly for running things like nail guns, stapters, and blowing up smaller tires. I bought that one because it had oiling and no drive belt. ...J.D.
 

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Discussion Starter #29
I thought about that, but honestly don't see me using it that often so hopefully it'll last me a while - portability / storage is a key consideration at the moment.
If it ends up being more regular use, then I'd look at getting a bigger one anyway (back to something more like the Stanley!).
I find cheapo tools can be OK if not in heavy use. For e.g. my hand drill only cost about $20 new, but its still going strong 5 years later - it only comes out to play about 3-4 time year, so big $$ ain't really worth it
 

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I too had the Hitachi piggyback compressor. Basically a copy of a an Emglo compressor with the Italian pump. Heavy to carry about but very useful. I used it professionally. But, my small Makita is oilless and has been working fine for probably at least 20 years. I don't use it like I did with the Hitachi, but for casual use, no issues.
 

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I have popped beads using a floor style bicycle pump
Me too but it's easier with a compressor. I've never had to screw out the valve either just pump it up. Wheels and tyres tend to be very round so sealing them is a lot easier than unsealing them! Any old compressor will work I am sure except those silly 12v car accessory socket jobs. Get yourself some monster cable zip ties too as they are like magic when tyre changing.
 

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For what it’s worth... I currently have 4 bikes, track bikes get new tires every year. And I’ve always used either a twin stack construction compressor or a pancake trim compressor. Never had one not set. Sometimes I have to put a ratchet strap on the tire to get the tire to touch the rim all around. Might be wonkie but it works for me. I’ve done 03 Sprint RS, 01 Suzuki Katana, 03 Ducati 800SS 79 Bonneville special, 99 Kawasaki Ninja 250 and most recently 04 Ducati 749... oh and I’ve done a friends Yamaha Fz07 and countless other trailer tires. You work with what ya got and sometimes you get good at it😎
 

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I have a Metzler manual tire balancer that works great too. They are relatively inexpensive. Stick on wheel weights are the only thing you’ll need. And a valve stem remover. And tire irons....and like Grinny said.... manic zip ties. You’ll see that you MUST get half the tire to stay in the center of the rim in order to easily persuade the other half over the rim. A soapy solution helps and bead seal if desired.
 

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I'm not sure this is as easy as some think. I had experience recently where I could not seat the beads on two scooter tyres. You cannot get enough air in through the empty valve stems using an average domestic compressor. Some of the tyre shops use a compressed air "bomb" which shoots sufficient air in between the rim and bead and I had to resort to this. Possibly its easier with bigger tyres but you may wish to bite the bullet once the tyre is on the rim and get a professional to set the bead. Just my two cents worth.
 

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Question for you guys with compressors...

Just wondering how big a compressor you need to seat a tubeless tyre? I fancy going DIY tyre changing, but would need a compressor to seat the bead.
Smaller the better, as I don't have much space. I would also need to use a power extension lead, which isn't recommended for motors on larger compressors. I am also limited to 10Amps 240v on the home circuit.

I have my eye on one of these at a good price second hand, but looks like maybe overkill...(6.7 cfm /190 lpm, 10 bar/ 145 psi, 50 l / 13 gallon tank)


It also has a specific warning against using an extension lead - I have a 10amp rated lead, would that still be a problem?
I had an upright 25 gallon compressor that I sold because I needed the space it took up. I bought a six gallon pnacake compressor that sits on a shelf inthe garage, not taking any floor space. It does everything I need including building up to 125 pressure to seat a tire bead. If seating a tire is your major concern then you should check this out.

NY Bob
 

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Thanks for all the info, much appreciated.
I can appreciate the buy-bigger-and-you'll-use-it approach, but for now space is at a premium, so it's good to hear a smaller unit should do the trick, I'd really like that Stanley at its on a very good price ($300), but I gotta admit there's really just nowhere handy to keep it :(
So, much as I'd love to be able to sandblast the sh*t out of everything in sight, I'll have a scout for something more modest (and less likely to cause a domestic!). The only other use I'd really like it for would be occasional airbrushing - but that would be small scale (airbrush rather than spray-gun).
Electrically I don’t think you’re ok.
With the motor rated at 2200w and using 230v as your supply voltage( which is pretty spot on: unless you have a 500kv transformer 25 meters away) you’ll be drawing 9.6 amps as your best scenario.
The longer the extension lead, the more voltage drop you’ll have. When your volts drop your current will increase. Hence the reason a 10 amp cord ain’t recommended.

The ideal safe solution is to have a circuit protected by a 20amp breaker and ensure the circuit is wired with 2.5mm2 sized wire. AND a 15amp extension lead has a larger sized earth
prong so it CANNOT be used in a “normal” GPO. You will need a special GPO with an enlarged earth socket.( the bottom vertical slot in the GPO).
And of course this is either a DEDICATED circuit solely for your 15amp plug: or you don’t use anything else on that circuit whilst the Air Compressor is running.
You don’t want to run the risk of burning out wiring, or nuisance tripping of your Breaker.
 

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I think the OP has already made his decision, but I’ll echo what a couple others have said. I use a “high volume” bicycle tire pump and use some rim lube with the valve core removed. Has always worked on motorcycle and bike tires. Once I had a lawnmower tire not seat that way, but it wouldn’t seat with a compress either.
 
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