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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Question for you guys with compressors...

Just wondering how big a compressor you need to seat a tubeless tyre? I fancy going DIY tyre changing, but would need a compressor to seat the bead.
Smaller the better, as I don't have much space. I would also need to use a power extension lead, which isn't recommended for motors on larger compressors. I am also limited to 10Amps 240v on the home circuit.

I have my eye on one of these at a good price second hand, but looks like maybe overkill...(6.7 cfm /190 lpm, 10 bar/ 145 psi, 50 l / 13 gallon tank)


It also has a specific warning against using an extension lead - I have a 10amp rated lead, would that still be a problem?
 

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In my way of thinking there is no such thing as "overkill" when it comes.to air compressors. Mine has a 30 gal. vertical tank, 15 amp. motor runnimg on a dedicated 230 volt curcuit. It is bolted to fhe floor in the corner of my shop. Hard piped through the shop with quick connects. You never know. Blowing up a tire today or running a air grinder or spray gun tomorrow :) ...J.D.
 

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I think the compressor you're interested in is definitely overkill. What is needed to seat a tire is psi/bar 90 psi/6 or 7 bar will be enough. cfm or l/min is not critical as that affects how fast you can inflate the tyre and the volume is not great lots of flow is not needed. However if as Wire-Wheels suggests and you start using other tools volume can become an issue and you may want a higher l/min capacity. As for the extension I would get one with highest rated amps and the shortest length and use it.
The first couple of time you do use it check to see if it is getting hot if not I wouldn't worry about it. But I am not an engineer of a lawyer.
 

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As Brittrip says, remove the valve core. Then stand the tire upright, push down on the top of the tire, and inflate. If air is blowing out, see where it's blowing out and move that area either to the top where your hand is or down on the floor. Push down on the tire from the top again and put some air to it. Sooner or later, you'll find the sweet spot and the tire will start filling with air.
 

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Has anybody tried the petrol trick?

ETA: nothing wrong with using an extension cord if the wire and fittings are rated for 10A. 2.5HP is around 1.8KW, which is a current draw of 1800/230 = about 8 amps. The warning about extension leads relates to the same issue as using welders - if you keep them rolled up while working, it basically becomes a large inductive coil heater that will melt itself into a smoking heap. Extend and uncoil the lead completely and you should be g2g.
 

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Yep have seen steam coming from damp grass under a coiled extension lead under loads that don't trip the rcd
in the back of my van is a 20 cfm 150 psi compressor that will run anything including 1" drive truck wheel nut gun
no problems with that its got a honda petrol engine on it ! and there's another option for you.
 

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I smell a business opportunity. Wifi-enabled, IOT cable caddy with integrated hall effect sensor that refuses to transmit current if not completely unrolled. Gal-friendly auto-rewind remote control button on the prong end. Has speed-dial to the fire brigade.

Any venture capitalists here?
 

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I have popped beads using a floor style bicycle pump. It can be done. I now have a small pancake style compressor. I used to have a professional IR vertical compressor for work, but sold that behemoth. If removing the valve from the stem, you will need a hose attachment that clamps over the valve stem, not the type that has a pin that needs to press against the valve to release the air. If you want to purchase a larger compressor to be able to use for other air driven tools, you do need to consider CFM, not just pressure.
 

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The secret is air volume per unit of time. (cu ft/sec for example) Many home compressors come with 1/4" id air hoses. If you can change that to something on the order of 3/8" diameter you more than double the volume of air per unit time you can deliver into the tire. So....big dia air hose and remove the valve core should give good results.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Thanks for all the info, much appreciated.
I can appreciate the buy-bigger-and-you'll-use-it approach, but for now space is at a premium, so it's good to hear a smaller unit should do the trick, I'd really like that Stanley at its on a very good price ($300), but I gotta admit there's really just nowhere handy to keep it :(
So, much as I'd love to be able to sandblast the sh*t out of everything in sight, I'll have a scout for something more modest (and less likely to cause a domestic!). The only other use I'd really like it for would be occasional airbrushing - but that would be small scale (airbrush rather than spray-gun).
 

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Despite what many will tell you, a decent small home compressor that uses mains power, and a well lubed tire bead will work just fine. I mounted 4 tires a few months ago (2 on my Speed Twin, 2 on my brother's KTM Duke) using this compressor. Pop, pop...done!

Admittedly, in the past I have used several different 12V compressors that eventually got the job done, but took a lot more tries as they don't move enough air to get to get the bead to seat.

 

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Has anybody tried the petrol trick?

ETA: nothing wrong with using an extension cord if the wire and fittings are rated for 10A. 2.5HP is around 1.8KW, which is a current draw of 1800/230 = about 8 amps. The warning about extension leads relates to the same issue as using welders - if you keep them rolled up while working, it basically becomes a large inductive coil heater that will melt itself into a smoking heap. Extend and uncoil the lead completely and you should be g2g.
Petrol trick?
I don’t know that one, but seen my old man seat a truck tire with starter fluid. Once he got the tire on the rim he sprayed it full of starter fluid and lite it with a match....
Boom.
Bead was set.
It was pretty exciting at 7 or 8, but I don’t think I’d try it 50 years later.
Small compressor will work fine, just lube up the bead and rim real good.
I’ve used a 1 hp 5gal for a few years before upgrading to a bigger compressor.
I’ve mounted 5 sets myself with the 5 gal. unit.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Despite what many will tell you, a decent small home compressor that uses mains power, and a well lubed tire bead will work just fine. I mounted 4 tires a few months ago (2 on my Speed Twin, 2 on my brother's KTM Duke) using this compressor. Pop, pop...done!

Admittedly, in the past I have used several different 12V compressors that eventually got the job done, but took a lot more tries as they don't move enough air to get to get the bead to seat.

That looks handy!
Is the spec right? It's claiming105.94 ft³/min! - that's about 10x the 2.5hp Stanley I was looking at
 
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