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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Doing the normal spring upkeep and while trying to drain oil from the oil drain (not secondary) the plug is stripped....not a big deal either retapping or putting in a heli-coil (I think thats how it's spelled), but I am at a loss how to get the plug out as it's rounded and the bootom fins make it impossible to get a grab on it to pull while trying to remove. Any suggestions other than drilling it out? I am a bit spooked by the drilling as the last thing I want is metal shards in the bottom of the block......
 

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Slightly smaller socket & an impact driver ? (Or a torx bit if it's an allen bolt.)
 

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Dremel it!

Hey Patrol-
I stripped on last year- I experienced success in VERY carefully using a Dremel attachment with a cutting disk, and cutting an "X" shape into the bolt head. If done correctly, you can then use a larger-sized screwdriver and get it out. (Penetrating oil is not a bad idea first...)
I was using the "Dremel" attachment on a RotoZip cutting tool. Any of the metal-cutting disks will work, and I think that it's a better alternative to drilling through the bolt into your crankcase...:D
 

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I second the dremel

or

tack weld piece of bar stock or anything really to the bolt to give you leverage to pull down at the same time as turn

or

drill and tap a small hole in the bolt - then screw and loctite a similar something as above

I wouldn't drill right through the bolt - messy and likelihood of swarf in engine
 

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Home Depot sells a screw removal bit. You drill a small hole into the bolt and it's like a reverse screw. As you screw it into the hole it tightens in the hole and forces it to turn lefty loosey.
 

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Home Depot sells a screw removal bit. You drill a small hole into the bolt and it's like a reverse screw. As you screw it into the hole it tightens in the hole and forces it to turn lefty loosey.
just dont break it off - easy to do - expensive when you do - this is why those things are banned from my shop

Actually - this may be one of the first times I have seen a good use for these
 

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I have had good luck drilling a hole to a shallow depth (not through), and then using a left hand thread tap of the correct size (tight). Once it bottoms out, it grips very well, and you can get enough leverage to break it loose. Two advantages to this:
1- Using a larger drill and tap than those screw extractor things, which are too small in diameter and don't have enough surface area for good purchase. The torque is also concentrated in the smaller diameter, and that is why they tend to snap off and leave the broken stub. Get the largest left hand tap you can find for the bolt you have stuck, and you won't have this problem.
2- The tap fits into a t-handle, which will give you easy access into the fin area.

We would probably all be smart to remove and then reinstall all of these plugs whenever we're doing the oil change, so they will come out when you need them. I also try to wire brush or otherwise clean the bolt heads, etc., before applying the socket, as sometimes the accumulated grease can make your socket ride shallow, and you're only twisting on the top 50% of the hex head, which naturally wants to round off. It feels just fine when you put the socket on the bolt, but even a slight amount can be the deal killer.
 

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l would go with the dremel but only cut a single slot for a screwdriver. If that fails then try welding a smaller size socket to the bolt. Try the first two as if they fail you have still got all of the bolt left to drill. The extractors are risky as they can snap leaving hardened metal in the hole that is very hard to remove. Is it possible to drop the sump without removing the engine, not had to do it yet, that would make life easier for you. There is a tool that locks on to a rounded bolt but l doubt if you have enough room around the fins unless you grind a few back a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Hi All,

Thanks for the idea's.....my issue is not that I can't turn the plug...I have plenty of grip, it's the fact that the threads are bungled so that's all it does is turn.

Hey Mic-I thought of a tac weld and most likely that is the way I'll go.....thought about drilling a small hole and using an impact puller but I'm leary about putting that much torque on aluminum. As it is, Im going to pull the tank, drain the bowls and oil from the other oil drain plug, lay the bike partially on it's side so I can get a good grip on things. Even with a lift, I'm still at a bad angle and want to get as much straight leverage as I can.
 

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Take the sump pan off? At least that way you should be able to spin the plug out, with a drill, from the top down.
 

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My tap solution lets you apply some outward pressure, as the whole tap is locked into the bolt head. I've used a notched pry bar at the tap handle locking ring to apply additional pressure.
 

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Hi All,

Thanks for the idea's.....my issue is not that I can't turn the plug...I have plenty of grip, it's the fact that the threads are bungled so that's all it does is turn.

Hey Mic-I thought of a tac weld and most likely that is the way I'll go.....thought about drilling a small hole and using an impact puller but I'm leary about putting that much torque on aluminum. As it is, Im going to pull the tank, drain the bowls and oil from the other oil drain plug, lay the bike partially on it's side so I can get a good grip on things. Even with a lift, I'm still at a bad angle and want to get as much straight leverage as I can.
Ah...then drill and tap for a bolt which can be pulled strongly while you turn (a helper would be good for this), the plug's thread should pick up again if you get it started - it's only alloy so shouldn't be too hard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thanks all......guess the last time I did an oil change and cranked down on the plug it was a bit too hearty....that'll teach me to crank past spec....

I agree once I have a good hold of the plug and can give it a pull this should come out...I'll update once I go to town on it. If not, the sump is coming off and I'll work it on the bench....it's only a gasket.....
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Update....

After pulling the plug by laying the bike on it's side so I could get at the plug, I decided my best course was to pull the sump....that took removing the exhausts, and partially removeing the swingarm to get at the back bolt and remove the oil sensor clip. Glad I did!!! There is a pick up that runs into a reseviour with a fine screen that draws oil from the very bottom of the sump and filters it. Not only were there a couple of the Aluminum thread bits, but more to my surprise, just general crap from normal use. I was very surprised the amount of crud that was in the screen. To be honest, pulling this was a bit of a pain but only took an hour or so and IMO this is something that should be done under general maintence and I am going to do periodically moving forward. I realize the oil filter will catch most of the crud that works into the oil but for the cost of a gasket, this is worthwhile as I have alwasy changed out oil ever 3-5k and replaced filters each time.

Anyhow, a machinest friend of mine is taking the sump and re-threading this to the next size up and coming up with a new plug.....Nice when a simple Ahh $hit uncovers somehting that might have caused some issues down the line.....
 

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Glad you have it sorted - dont worry too much about the oil pickup screen - you have to do an enormous amount of miles / treat your engine very poorly before the stuff in it causes problems. Certainly not worth regularly dropping the sump to clean it, but if you
REALLY must I'd say do it every 75k or so
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
HI Mic,

Thanks for the advise. It was pretty crudded up and fairly easy to get to. Hey, your a Vermont guy..you heading to Bennington this year?
 

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Was thinking I might but the bike needs some work - I'm ashamed to admit I didnt get to ride it last year because of other commitments - it needs a new chain and the carbs are in need of a clean out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Hi Mic,

No worries, it's 2 months away and well worth the ride. Love to see ya there.
 
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