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Since I am somewhat aged and a graduate of that "Old School" that a number of us can claim as our Alma Mata, I have a question concerning spark plugs. Are the iridium plugs that much of an improvement over the standard style that I have used for years. I know they claim hotter spark, increased mileage, smoother idle, so on and so on. Any users out there who can verify this and help justify their cost at around three times the level of the old stand by's. Yes I am considering a set as soon as I have the money saved, this extra cylinder thing is getting costly...........
 

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Well, I was actually told by an NGK rep (but don't konw how tech he was) that in our bikes, they should make no difference. But I like them. They last at least twice as long as standard types & stay near perfectly gapped & very clean - officially a 24k mile plug, I've heard talk of 100k miles. I probably wouldn't argue with 50k.

Some folks report better, smoother running. Combustion is technically a 'chaotic' process with flame front speed very dependent on mixture turbulence at the point of ignition. So I'm inclined to think that the more consistent spark path arising from a much smaller centre electrode (& very clean) can't hurt at all & could offer some explanation for reports of better running. Tho' it might be just the fact of fitting new plugs. Even if that's the case, I'd expect the Iridiums to have some advantage over time. Perhaps the more so if any carb/airbox mods & jetting changes have been made?

Now, the oil I'm using.... :D
 

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Give it time

Now, the oil I'm using....


Mike,

It is just cool enough for spark plugs. It has got to get cold as a well diggers arse for an extended period, then the oil thread really kicks in...... Thanks for the input.
 

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I put some iridium ones in my Pickup truck a few weeks ago.

I replaced some platinum ones with the iridium ones.

The guys at the parts store said they will last longer than the Platinum ones.

The Platinum ones last nearly 100,000 in my truck. I have 193,000 on it and this is only the second set of plugs. So if they last as good as the parts guys say it will be quite some time before I have first hand experience to report.

Edit: And 2 of the 6 are so difficult to remove that I would not put used ones back in there.
 

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Guys , Remember this .

Spark plugs and the heads they go into , are two different types of metal . Over the course to time these metals can have a chemical reaction to each other. You wait to long before switching plugs and the threads from the head may come out with the plug.

This tip comes free of charge from the Triumph brotherhood in Minnesota ,USA . Where the temp this morning was 27 degrees. Everyday I thank the guys in England for that big windshield on my Blue/Silver Mint 96 Adventurer.

Peace and Grease,
Glaze out .
 

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copper slip, I've always used that on spark plugs for as long as I can remember.

The torque specs for plugs is purely bunk also....

Read the box carefully and depending on the type of seal it tells you how much to tighten it after making contact. It depends on wether it is a tapered seal or a crush gasket that makes the seal. On NGK plug boxes there is a pictorial instruction for that purpose.

The routine maintenance list for my truck states to change plugs every 95,000 miles.
Seems like alot to me, but the ones I've removed were not terribly worn.
 

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Spark plugs and the heads they go into , are two different types of metal . Over the course to time these metals can have a chemical reaction to each other. You wait to long before switching plugs and the threads from the head may come out with the plug.
copper slip, I've always used that on spark plugs for as long as I can remember.

The torque specs for plugs is purely bunk also....
Excellent advise!

Just because the plugs will last 100K miles does not mean that they should be left in the head all that time.

Pull the plugs every XXX miles and have a look at their color which will tell you how the motor is running, then put them back with a bit of copper slip or similar.

As for torque, an old time biker once told me:
Finger tight and 1/8th of a turn is enough.
Which equates to approx 'so-it-wont-fall-out foot/lbs'
 

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I use the Iridium plugs, and they seem to work great, although it may just be the placebo effect. I do know that in all of my small gas engines like lawn mowers, snowblowers, etc., I have always used the NGK regular copper core plugs, as I think they are a much better quality than the Champion that many places carry and recommend.
I have a large can of never-seize that I use liberally, as many of my tractors, snowblowers, etc., are strictly seasonal machines and spend a great deal of time simply sitting and quietly rusting. Anyone who has ever had a difficult plug to remove will be an instant convert to lubing the plug threads from that day onward.
I'm sure everyone already knows this, but in case one of you doesn't, get a short piece of coolant hose that slips over the porcelain part of the plug snugly, and use this to start the plug into the hole. If you turn it slowly counterclockwise you will feel it click when the thread hits the entry gate, at which time you reverse direction and tighten it until the hose begins to slip. At this point, there is just a bit of wrenching left to get it tight. If you lube your plugs, you can also use this same hose to remove them once you have broken them free and spun them a few turns. It really helps on these deep plug chambers on the triples. For plugs that are too tight you'll have to stick to the ratchet and then the magnet to retrieve them.
 

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This thread makes me want to replace my plugs tomorrow. I imagine my 2000 Legend has the original plugs, since she only had 7,000 miles on the clock when I bought her.

It's correct that two different metals over time causes corrosion because that's basically how a battery works.

Glaze, thanks for the memory jog.

Kem
 
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