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Hi,

My lovely T registered Legend 900 has one serious problem - well, not serious, more a pain in the backside. It has no fuel guage. Can anyone recommend an after market one for the 900 Legend that is easy enough to fit? I don't mind one of those electronic ones that sits on the filler cap or something similar.

Thanks

Paul
 

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Hi,

My lovely T registered Legend 900 has one serious problem - well, not serious, more a pain in the backside. It has no fuel guage. Can anyone recommend an after market one for the 900 Legend that is easy enough to fit? I don't mind one of those electronic ones that sits on the filler cap or something similar.

Thanks

Paul
The only option I can think of is a switch to manual petcock giving you a reserve. That will only increase the reliability of your bike - no sensitive vacuum operated diaphragm to malfunction at the worst possible time. Your odometer plus a reserve should be more than enough to manage fuel.
 

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Tiger 900 GT Pro
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Here you go. There are many aftermarket fuel gauges but they only replace OEM and need some sort of sender unit inside the tank. This one fits old school bikes with a petcock.

 

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2000 Legend TT
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The only option I can think of is a switch to manual petcock giving you a reserve.
My 2000 Legend TT does have a manual reserve. I just have to remember to use it.

But that aftermarket gauge is pretty cool.
 

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One of the things I enjoy about my old Legend is it's complete lack of frills. ...J.D.
 

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Even with all the electronics telling you how much fuel you have and how much distance to empty etc, it's still possible to get into trouble.

On a trip early this year I was traveling south and filled up at Gouburn NSW. Next stop was Albury for the night and I filled up the next morning before heading out. That's about 360 kms and the bike still had fuel to spare. On the way back up north a week later I filled up at a highway stop just south of Albury so I could bypass the city and ride straight through. I planned on Goulburn for the next fill, same trip as earlier.

There was a strong headwind riding north and the dash was telling me I might not make it. Sure enough, I ran out 15 kms out of town. I hitched into town for a fuel can, hitched back etc. In my head was the knowledge that the bike made it going south, so should make it going north. Nope.

The distance to empty ran down to zero before the bike stopped, and stayed on zero for 35 kms before it ran out. At least I now know how much fuel there is when the bike shows empty.

And a nice twist. Hitching into town I got picked up by an old lady with a cat, not the most expected person to pick up a stranger. She said she wanted to stop for a cup of tea so she drove me right to the service area on the edge of town. On the way back I got picked up by a young mum with a baby in the back, another unexpected pickup. She said she felt sorry for me carrying a fuel can. She turned off the main road and I then got picked up by a semi trailer, I thought those guys were not allowed to have non-staff in the truck. He took me to the bike. I rode to town to fill up the bike and the first lady was just getting into her car, so I stopped to tell her I made it. She was very happy to know I was not out there on the road. The episode took an hour from running out to riding off with a full tank.
 

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2014 Scrambler
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Using the same principal as checking for the fuel level in carb float bowls, you can splice into the fuel line and then run a tube up the side of your tank. The fuel level shown on the outside will be the same as in the tank. You'll have to figure out a vented cap of some sort, and use a clear hose that is resistant to breakdown with fuel. $20 for the whole setup, maybe. Gravity has a habit of being reliable.

You can get fancy, too.
Automotive lighting Automotive design Natural material Composite material Input device


EDIT: Sorry, I am assuming you have carbs.
 

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Using the same principal as checking for the fuel level in carb float bowls, you can splice into the fuel line and then run a tube up the side of your tank. The fuel level shown on the outside will be the same as in the tank. You'll have to figure out a vented cap of some sort, and use a clear hose that is resistant to breakdown with fuel. $20 for the whole setup, maybe. Gravity has a habit of being reliable.

You can get fancy, too.
View attachment 766678

EDIT: Sorry, I am assuming you have carbs.
I do like that look on custom bikes.
 
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