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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Have added the "off road" Vance & Hines exhaust to my Street Twin, and put about 130 miles on the bike with the first test ride. While the stock exhaust looks and sounds super, the Vance & Hines looks equally great and really enhanced the bike's performance and sound. This is the exhaust that compliments the Street Twin's mid-range torque.

Installation was rather straight-forward (assuming you've swapped out a Triumph Bonneville or Truxton exhaust before). There are a few rubber mounting pieces that need to be removed from the stock slip-ons and replaced onto the Vance & Hines set, as you don't get a second set. One bit of advice about the need to remove the rear passenger foot pegs, as required. In order to remove the pegs and swap out the exhausts, you actually have to first disassemble the pegs down to the small ball bearing, small spring and metal clip. That is because in order to briefly remove the pegs, it takes an allen head wrench and another wrench, and there is insufficient room to fit the allen head without taking the peg completely apart. A little different and slightly more time consuming compared to removing passenger pegs on a 2015 and earlier Bonneville or Truxton. If not done very carefully, it's really easy to send the small ball bearing and spring shooting out and being lost. (In my case, briefly hidden till found as I crawled around on my knees looking for it on the garage floor.)

The workmanship of the stock exhaust system and the Vance & Hines are identical, so I assume its all made by the same company. The Vance & Hines set is about 3" shorter in length. Also, the Vance & Hines system is considerably lighter in weight, perhaps by 40%. I am guessing at 40%, but I feel that's about accurate. The weight savings is very noticeable between the two. I was really glad to gain this weight reduction. I didn't have a set of scales to measure, however.

The stock system has no removable baffle. Once removed, I could look from end to end through the inside. There are no internal obstructions. However, the inner wall of the stock exhaust tube running from end to end looked sealed with respect to there being no obvious openings to the outer chamber. Maybe there is one, but I couldn't see it. In contrast, the Vance & Hines has a small removable metal clip holding in a simple snap ring. Removing that allows for the 3" to 4" baffle to come out. It looks a lot like a trumpet mouth piece. When looking through the Vance & Hines exhaust, you also easily see end to end, and, the entire inner chamber is perforated with plenty of holes from end to end, incorporating the outer chamber as well. With the baffle removed, the end of the exhaust opening is larger than stock and much better looking. (There is no way to "bore out" the Street Twin's stock exhaust and make it compatible with the Vance & Hines, as can often be done with stock Harley-Davidson exhausts verses Screaming' Eagle exhaust upgrades). Stock verses Vance & Hines Street Twin exhausts look almost the same on the outside, but differ totally on the inside.

The dealer told me I would need to bring the bike in for the required ignition remap, and until I do, I may experience some popping on deceleration, etc. But I can report that the bike ran super today with zero popping, stumbles or other indication of an immediate need for the remapping to be done. I was pleasantly surprised about that. In fact, the Street Twin performed so well it makes me feel the Vance & Hines exhaust is ideally paired to make full advantage of the mid-range torque. I have no access to a dyno for the moment to document any performance gains. But I can say that the bike's quickness from a stop up to 90 mph (before shifting into 5th) easily beats my past new classic triumph Truxton's and Bonnevilles that all had Predator or Arrow exhausts, air box removed, K&N air filters, etc. (Let the doubters' comments begin, but I know what my Street Twin delivers versus my previous Triumphs).

In terms of sound, the Vance & Hines set is a little louder than stock when started, but not obnoxious at all. A very deep resonance that is quite different from Predators or Arrow systems. However, if you give the Street Twin full throttle, the Vance & Hines exhaust barks with a very deep v-twin sound, a lot like what I've heard on an Aprilia, Buell or Ducati at the VIR track. After 4 hours, it didn't wear out my ears the way Predators on a Truxton would give - just my opinion.

Attached are two photos - one of my bike with the shorter Vance & Hines exhaust (and Triumph rubber tank knee pads mounted), and the other photo showing the inside of the exhaust.

I highly recommend the Vance & Hines exhaust and its a worthwhile accessory worth the cost.
 

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I've ridden the bike with the German version of the Vance & Hines (are there any differences?) and came to the conclusion that this Street Twin is absolutely awesome because there are so many good things coming together. All of them works, maybe not on paper (only 55hp) ... but in the real world, on real roads.

Therefore my recommendation: If you have a chance to ride this new Triumph, please do it. Even if it looks bland on paper.


 

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Discussion Starter #8
The knee pads really make a huge difference in the overall appearance of the bike!!!!!!
I have always added knee pads to my new classic Triumphs - I've have several of these bikes since 2005. The pads on my Street Twin are the current ones as found on 2015 and earlier Bonnevilles, not the "new" style as pictured in the few available photos of the new water cooled bikes. Frankly, I don't like the looks of the new design, judging from those photos, and so I went ahead and added the existing knee pads.
 

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About to order mirrors and the tank pads. I agree with you that the newer pads don't look as good as the old one.
Any difficulty in applying the old to the new smaller tank?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
About to order mirrors and the tank pads. I agree with you that the newer pads don't look as good as the old one.
Any difficulty in applying the old to the new smaller tank?
I've added Triumph tank knee pads to 4-5 previous Scramblers, Bonnevilles & Truxtons I've owned. Putting them on the Street Twin was exactly the same procedure, and I spent a few minutes measuring, eyeballing the ideal location, and adding some black electrician's tape markers as a guide. If you've never done this before, be careful, as you only get ONE CHANCE once you pull off the thin wax paper covering the adhesive and apply it to the tank. It sticks instantly and can't be repositioned.

The photos I have found on line of the new knee pad design not only showed two different cosmetic changes (that I didn't like), but, also seems to show a smaller knee pad. I still have not seen one in person so I cannot be sure. But I can say the familiar rubber knee pads fit just fine regarding size, and laying flush against the Street Twin's tank.
 

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The new pads just don't look that great. I much prefer the "old" ones.
I'll be careful applying them once they come in.
Thanks for the input.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The new pads just don't look that great. I much prefer the "old" ones.
I'll be careful applying them once they come in.
Thanks for the input.
Sit on your bike and briefly place the knee pads between the tank and your knees. The Street Twin's lower seat height (compared to a Bonneville T100, with its flat seat) may cause you to think the pad placement doesn't exactly fit your knees in the same place as it might on a T100. For my bike I visually placed the knee pads where they looked appropriate, with respect to symmetry along the scolloped tank indentation, and horizontal bottom lines of the tank. After adding the knee pads and riding the bike, I was satisfied that I had placed them where I wanted.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
About to order mirrors and the tank pads. I agree with you that the newer pads don't look as good as the old one.
Any difficulty in applying the old to the new smaller tank?
PS - the Street Twin's gas tank is 1 gallon less in size, compared to a 2015 and earlier Bonneville, Scrambler or Truxton tank. But, those other models' gas tanks are primarily wider, not taller. That means the vertical face of the Street Twin's tank where you want to mount the rubber tank knee pads is roughly the same size, and therefore the traditional tank pads will look appropriately sized once added.

What type of mirrors are you adding, and can you upload a photo once done? I'm interested in adding the small round mirrors on the end of the handle bars.
 

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Scrambler...thanks for the info on knee pads & vance & hines. jrat..I had the rectangular mirrors installed today. I was going to get the teardrop version but they did not get them in yet. DO NOT get the accessory mirrors. The stems are way short & you get LESS reach than stock. Needless to say, I had the rectangular mirrors removed & had the stock put back on, Looking into bar-end mirrors after that tiny glitch. Be safe!
 

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I've ridden the bike with the German version of the Vance & Hines (are there any differences?) and came to the conclusion that this Street Twin is absolutely awesome because there are so many good things coming together. All of them works, maybe not on paper (only 55hp) ... but in the real world, on real roads.

Therefore my recommendation: If you have a chance to ride this new Triumph, please do it. Even if it looks bland on paper.


Sharp looking ride and it appears many are really liking these bikes . And most people can't ride a piece of paper :grin2: I'm thinking only a few have the ability to take the dyno printout and and make their magic flying carpet with it to ride :wink2::wink2:
 

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Have added the "off road" Vance & Hines exhaust to my Street Twin, and put about 130 miles on the bike with the first test ride. While the stock exhaust looks and sounds super, the Vance & Hines looks equally great and really enhanced the bike's performance and sound. This is the exhaust that compliments the Street Twin's mid-range torque.

Installation was rather straight-forward (assuming you've swapped out a Triumph Bonneville or Truxton exhaust before). There are a few rubber mounting pieces that need to be removed from the stock slip-ons and replaced onto the Vance & Hines set, as you don't get a second set. One bit of advice about the need to remove the rear passenger foot pegs, as required. In order to remove the pegs and swap out the exhausts, you actually have to first disassemble the pegs down to the small ball bearing, small spring and metal clip. That is because in order to briefly remove the pegs, it takes an allen head wrench and another wrench, and there is insufficient room to fit the allen head without taking the peg completely apart. A little different and slightly more time consuming compared to removing passenger pegs on a 2015 and earlier Bonneville or Truxton. If not done very carefully, it's really easy to send the small ball bearing and spring shooting out and being lost. (In my case, briefly hidden till found as I crawled around on my knees looking for it on the garage floor.)

The workmanship of the stock exhaust system and the Vance & Hines are identical, so I assume its all made by the same company. The Vance & Hines set is about 3" shorter in length. Also, the Vance & Hines system is considerably lighter in weight, perhaps by 40%. I am guessing at 40%, but I feel that's about accurate. The weight savings is very noticeable between the two. I was really glad to gain this weight reduction. I didn't have a set of scales to measure, however.

The stock system has no removable baffle. Once removed, I could look from end to end through the inside. There are no internal obstructions. However, the inner wall of the stock exhaust tube running from end to end looked sealed with respect to there being no obvious openings to the outer chamber. Maybe there is one, but I couldn't see it. In contrast, the Vance & Hines has a small removable metal clip holding in a simple snap ring. Removing that allows for the 3" to 4" baffle to come out. It looks a lot like a trumpet mouth piece. When looking through the Vance & Hines exhaust, you also easily see end to end, and, the entire inner chamber is perforated with plenty of holes from end to end, incorporating the outer chamber as well. With the baffle removed, the end of the exhaust opening is larger than stock and much better looking. (There is no way to "bore out" the Street Twin's stock exhaust and make it compatible with the Vance & Hines, as can often be done with stock Harley-Davidson exhausts verses Screaming' Eagle exhaust upgrades). Stock verses Vance & Hines Street Twin exhausts look almost the same on the outside, but differ totally on the inside.

The dealer told me I would need to bring the bike in for the required ignition remap, and until I do, I may experience some popping on deceleration, etc. But I can report that the bike ran super today with zero popping, stumbles or other indication of an immediate need for the remapping to be done. I was pleasantly surprised about that. In fact, the Street Twin performed so well it makes me feel the Vance & Hines exhaust is ideally paired to make full advantage of the mid-range torque. I have no access to a dyno for the moment to document any performance gains. But I can say that the bike's quickness from a stop up to 90 mph (before shifting into 5th) easily beats my past new classic triumph Truxton's and Bonnevilles that all had Predator or Arrow exhausts, air box removed, K&N air filters, etc. (Let the doubters' comments begin, but I know what my Street Twin delivers versus my previous Triumphs).

In terms of sound, the Vance & Hines set is a little louder than stock when started, but not obnoxious at all. A very deep resonance that is quite different from Predators or Arrow systems. However, if you give the Street Twin full throttle, the Vance & Hines exhaust barks with a very deep v-twin sound, a lot like what I've heard on an Aprilia, Buell or Ducati at the VIR track. After 4 hours, it didn't wear out my ears the way Predators on a Truxton would give - just my opinion.

Attached are two photos - one of my bike with the shorter Vance & Hines exhaust (and Triumph rubber tank knee pads mounted), and the other photo showing the inside of the exhaust.

I highly recommend the Vance & Hines exhaust and its a worthwhile accessory worth the cost.
Thanks a lot for the feedback and description!
I also plan to add the Vance & Hines exhaust to my Thruxton R but I thought that the "off road" version was called as it is because is was too loud to be street legal.
Do you consider that it is possible to ride inside a the city with the "off road" version in terms of noise loudness?

Thanks
 

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Good write up. As nice as the bike runs with the new exhaust, I'm wondering if a down load re-flash is not necessary? Most of that power is made in the mid range, it could be fine if left alone. I've noticed on the Guzzi V7's, people change exhaust and say, "no need for any down loads". Mid range powered bikes often adjust well enough with stock ECU programs. or so it appears.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Good write up. As nice as the bike runs with the new exhaust, I'm wondering if a down load re-flash is not necessary? Most of that power is made in the mid range, it could be fine if left alone. I've noticed on the Guzzi V7's, people change exhaust and say, "no need for any down loads". Mid range powered bikes often adjust well enough with stock ECU programs. or so it appears.
My Triumph dealer still speculates that remapping the bike's ignition may bring out even more mid range torque that I already feel is present. I will eventually ride over to the shop and get it one in the spring
 

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PS - the Street Twin's gas tank is 1 gallon less in size, compared to a 2015 and earlier Bonneville, Scrambler or Truxton tank. But, those other models' gas tanks are primarily wider, not taller. That means the vertical face of the Street Twin's tank where you want to mount the rubber tank knee pads is roughly the same size, and therefore the traditional tank pads will look appropriately sized once added.

What type of mirrors are you adding, and can you upload a photo once done? I'm interested in adding the small round mirrors on the end of the handle bars.
In bold, are you sure about that? I tried to compare the 2016 tank with a 2015 New Church that was sitting next to it and I'd swear the 2015 looked taller by at least an inch or more. Just wondered if you had spec's or just going from observation, which is all I had. I'm curious because I've been looking for a smaller tank since the day I got my 14.... still searching!
 
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