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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just spent two happy hours wrenching on my Legend. I pulled the air box and put in a new K & N filter, installed new carb rubbers on the manifold side (yes, they are still available from Triumph), replaced my Gill coils with new Nologys, removed my stock mufflers, removed the rear wheel and got the tire half off. Enough for one night - Tomorrow night I'll finish putting on the new Avon, switch out the old 17 tooth front sprocket for a new 18 tooth, and drain and replace my coolant. That just leaves a brake fluid flush and refill, and an epoxy treatment for the inside of my rusty tank. All of my bolts and fasteners had been treated with either Boeshield T-9 or never seize when last apart, and tonight they all came apart with ease. Spending time wrenching on the Legend is almost as enjoyable as riding it, and lets me check all of the important maintenance items before a problem turns up. For those of you reluctant to do your own work, I would encourage you to get a manual and some tools and start with the easy stuff. You'll be amazed at how quickly you'll get comfortable with your bike, and how much more pleasure you'll have riding it knowing that you serviced it yourself. The only downside is you'll always be looking for something to do on it, and this can get expensive:)
 

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I too spent some time wrenching today. (Thanks to getting rained out all day, April showers...)

Removed the ugly license plate light that hangs down way past the end of the fender. This also let me move the plate mounting bracket down to the lower mounting holes. Looks 10x better IMO. I'll post a pic when the weather allows. Not sure how much trouble I may get for that, but it's better to love and lose than never love at all right?

Put on my black chain guard, thanks again Denny for the lightning fast trade. Starting to like the look of my Legend even more... and have some new euro style bars coming in the mail with my new sprockets+chain. (I decided to order the aftermarket parts from bikebandit, but gave my local Trumph dealer over $100 for all the OEM gaskets, seals, etc.)

Took off the tank and topped up my coolant, checked my battery electrolyte levels, and more. I LOVE WRENCHING, even if it was just some minor stuff. I'll have my work cut out for me changing the sprockets/chain.
 

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Your local vehicle code probably requires that license plate to be illuminated at night, so you will need to do something to make that happen or you will have a problem.
 

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You can eliminate the hanger and still use the light, I have done that, or you can get some small lights that replace the reflectors that hold the plate in place. You are right, the Legend can be a fun bike to work on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The rear tire was a bit more difficult to mount than the front. It came off just fine, but it was a tight squeeze getting the new Storm on. I tried laying it on top of the old tire to protect the rotor, but I couldn't get enough leverage to keep the tire down in the rim sufficiently to get the bead down all the way around. I finally put it on some 2 x 4's and that solved the problem. I had two short tire irons, and picked up two longer ones today. They also helped get additional leverage on that tire. I also changed out the front sprocket to an 18 tooth, and while I was in there I replaced the clutch pushrod and the pushrod seal. The sprocket cover gasket had to be replaced as part of the job, but that was easy. No wear at all on the old pushrod (only 5000 miles on the bike), so I put that in the spare parts collection along with the Gill coils I took off yesterday, and the 17 tooth sprocket. The only problem was the article on webbikeworld suggested letting the oil drain out the gasket cover rather than drain the whole engine, as it wouldn't be much. Wrong! The biggest problem is that when you have it on the center stand, the oil drains out of the sprocket area directly over the centerstand, so you can't get a pan under it. I deflected as much as I could with a piece of cardboard, but most of it pooled under the bike. IMHO, definitely drain the crankcase before you pull the sprocket cover! I also noticed some oil dampness around the right hand kidney shaped cover, so I'll be ordering a new gasket for that. Overall, the rear wheel removal, tire change and reinstall was easier than I had imagined it would be. I do have an electric impact wrench, which allowed me to remove the sprocket nut easily. Installing and torqueing the new one was also easy, as I just stood on the right side of the bike so I could press the rear brake firmly, and I reached over and put the torque wrench on. That 36mm is a big socket, but I had one in my box from working on old Honda cars I had owned. I also bought a new rubbing block, but the old one had plenty of life left in it, and should actually wear more slowly, as the 18t should get the chain up a bit more off the block. At least that's what I have read. Not much left to finish, just top off the oil, put the tank and seat back on, and then drive it carefully until the new tires get worn in a bit. It is supposed to be in the mid 80's here this weekend, so I'm putting in some long nights now so I can ride, ride, ride! These bikes really are a treat to work on.
Oh yeah, I almost forgot the coolest thing I discovered - when I got the back tire off, there was a union jack label inside from the inspector I guess. It was pretty neat to find it (even though my rims say "made in Spain")
 

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The Union Jack inside probably says CWC?
That is the company in England who assembled the wheels for the classic Triples. Central Wheel Company (I think). The Akront rims were made in Spain, but CWC laced them to the hubs in England.

So i did something this evening that I've not done before.
Balanced the carbs on the TBS. One new RAT leader has a set of gauges for doing that. He brought it over and in just a few minutes it was all done. I knew it needed it a little, but man I did not realize how bad it was. It runs like a totally different motorcycle. much smoother on the low end, and rolling on from a dead stop.

First group ride of the year for me on Saturday and now I can't wait to check it out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yes, that's the label (I assumed it was one of those little English towns like ChomendlesyWorschesterCollenhennessy, or something along those lines:))
The carb sync does alot for smoothing things up, although I found I could seemingly move the adjuster screws just my staring at them hard and thinking about them moving. They really are that sensitive. The other cool thing about syncing is that if anyone stops by while you are doing it, the equipment with all the hoses, etc., lends an air of "this guy must really know what he is doing" to the event. Have a great ride tomorrow - I'll be out getting used to my new modifications:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Summary notes

Okay, I just finished up all of my work, and took her for a ride. She runs smoother than a dose of salts through a tall Swede, but she did that before all the work. Here are some thoughts about before and after:
1- The fork gaitors look cool as heck, and really make the bike look "classic". Knowing that my forks are protected from rocks and other injury only sweeten the deal.
2- The progressive fork springs and Amsoil fork oil have firmed up the ride considerably, but not in an unpleasant way. Fork dive is no longer a problem, and the front end no longer feels like a 1965 chevy impala. The biggest and, IMHO, most important change is that you stay up on your suspension much better coming into a turn. No more blipping the throttle to get the suspension up where it belongs.
3- The 18 tooth front sprocket was a big improvement. This engine has plenty of "hair around it", so there is no perceptible loss of power taking off in first gear. In fact, I like the fact that you can take off and get moving at a quite reasonable speed in first before you have to upshift now. With the 17 tooth, I always felt like I was pretty high into the revs, especially starting off from first gear into a turn. Now it feels smooth, and you can finish the turn and then upshift.
4- The Avon Storms feel much stickier than the Bridgestones that I took off. Quality of ride while cruising is not noticeably different, but together with the front suspension update, the bike feels more firmly planted on the road at all times.
5- Prior to storing last winter, I put Mobil 1 in it. The weather was getting colder here in upstate NY, so this may have been a factor, but I did notice that the bike shifted much harder with the Mobil 1 as opposed to the Royal Purple I had put in it previously. Today I drained the Mobil 1 out, and replaced it with Amsoil Motorcycle 10w-40. The bike now shifts so easily and smoothly that I can't believe it. Please keep in mind, however, that today is the first day to hit 80 degrees since last summer, so this may be a factor, but I am anxious to see how this oil performs in colder weather next fall.
6- The factory manual coolant change suggests using the coolant drain bolt which is the upper left one on the water pump. I drained this until it stopped, and then pulled the pipe connecting below it from the radiator. Alot of additional antifreeze poured out when I pulled off the pipe, so I would suggest doing this. I had a new o ring on hand for the pipe, and would suggest getting one ahead of time. I also replaced the drain bolt with a stainless one, as the original was very rusty and corroded. I did use the original copper gasket on this and the vent bolt at the filler spout. That one was also pretty rusted, but I cleaned it up and reused it. Be warned - the coolant comes out in a sudden rush! (don't ask:))
7- Okay, so I broke down and put the TORs back on. It doesn't idle as well with them on, and it backfires on decelleration, but it does sound pretty special when you jump on it. I still can't decide if I like these or the quiet stock pipes, but it does run and idle smooth as butter with the stockers on. Since a new K & N filter was part of my upgrade, this may have affected the idle too I suppose.
8- The Dupont Teflon really is much cleaner on the chain. While I was changing the sprocket and had the rear wheel off, I cleaned the chain up quite a bit, and then relubed it with the teflon. Does a beautiful job, and it may just be my imagination, but I swear it is much quieter when I have it on the center stand and spin the rear tire by hand. I had been using the PJ or PB whatever blue label clear spray lube.
9- I mentioned earlier in this thread that the kidney shaped right hand engine cover was leaking a little oil. Just for the heck of it, I took the torque wrench and rechecked all of those 8mm stainless bolts that hold all those covers on. All of them moved at least half a turn before the wrench clicked, so I would encourage anyone with a torque wrench to take 5 minutes and check these. Hopefully, my oil leak will be gone now.
10- While filling the oil, I noticed that when the engine was running on the center stand and level, the window looked nearly empty. As soon as I shut it down, the oil filled it again. I didn't change the filter today, as I had done that before storage in the fall, but it still took nearly 4 full quarts to fill to the top of the window. Apparently the filter itself does not hold much, so if you are changing the oil without a filter change, plan on having 4 quarts on hand.
11- The Nology coils had no effect on anything that I could see. I didn't think they would, as my Gills only had 5000 miles on them, and I replaced them only for reliability sake. Still, thought I'd mention it, as I recall someone talking about a performance improvement. They were probably talking about Gill coils that were already starting to go bad.
12- My final job is to use the Caswell kit I bought on the fuel tank, as it has rust visible through the filler hole. I'm going to wait until a few days of good hot and dry weather before I do this one. I'll post the results when I do.
I hope some of you who may be contemplating some of these jobs find this information useful. Happy riding everyone!
 

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When I switched to the Thunderbike 3 in 1 exhaust and a K&N air filter I also started to get some popping on deceleration. Switched pilot jets and all is good. There are a lot of older threads on this issue if it becomes enough of an irritant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks Russ. The jury is still out on which pipes I prefer (must be the female gene from my mother expressing itself)
 

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I also bought a new rubbing block, but the old one had plenty of life left in it, and should actually wear more slowly, as the 18t should get the chain up a bit more off the block. At least that's what I have read.
Did you end up using the new block, or did you put the old one back on?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I left the old one in place. It had lots of wear left (Bike's only got 5000 miles on it).
 
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