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Discussion Starter #1
1996 T Bird 3 owner.
Brief History ~7500 mi
Battery wouldn't hold charge.
Put in new battery would run as long a battery stayed charge only about 10 mi.
Changed rectifier with one purchased from electrosport
Now won't start
I removed the spark plug for spark check while cranking-no spark.
I have checked the kill switch
side stand switch
there were blu/r blu/grey two wires melted together-fixed that
the starter solenoid does get warm while cranking. I can hold it but it is warm.
any ideas much appreciated
 

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Not sure where to start here, something has happened since you changed the rectifier, am assuming it is an equivalent match.

Where were the two melted wires attached to ?

It appears to have had too much power or a short that caused the melting, assuming during or after you changed the rectifier.

You will need to check on the fuses inc the main 30amp fuse.

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Ride on ! :)
 

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Any update on this nipomoca. The fact you can crank the engine ? seems that the main fuse is OK but it seems at the moment you have shorted something out, a fuse or the ignitor. Those melted wires doesn't sound good atall. You're going to have to go thru the electrics to see where.

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Ride on ! :)
 

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the wires that melted were part of the headlight switch,engine start/stop switch and the front brake light switch. I repaired the blue melted. Tried to start it-still no spark. I went through it with a continuity tester. That is how I discovered the melted blue wires. They probably melted when I tried to jump start it with a car battery.
The wiring seems basic but I am at a loss. I just need to keep trying.
Maybe I should try and push start it.
 

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If you've no spark at the plugs you'll be pushing all day, no different to pushing and cranking.

I hope you didn't try to start the bike with a car battery from a running car !

You might have blown the ignitor which is a costly item. Make sure your bike battery is fully charged and then test thru the electrical system.

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Ride on ! :)
 

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I don't like the sound of melted wires. I think you should take a step back & check fuses & circuits for continuity or voltage presence against the wiring diagram. I would want to establish just why those wires melted. If you dont have a wiring diagram I could scan the haynes manual one if the mods are ok with that.
 

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Ignitors are big bucks, but have heard of people repairing them by changing the power transistors (assuming that 's the part thats fried). Check the resistance of the pickup coil. Accord:confused:ing to the Haynes manual should be around 530 ohms. I've had problems with my speed triple losing spark when hot and found the pickup coil resistance would drop to practically nothing when hot. Do yourself a favour and buy a manual they are invaluable when chasing problems like these.
 

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Jump starting from a vehicle with a running engine is the way it's done over here - I can't see why it would be a problem or cause harm :confused: . It just makes a bit more power available & will start to charge the battery a little on the vehicle to be 'jumped' - bringing both batteries up toward 14V 'float' level. For car to bike, extra power would hardly be needed, so not worth doing but can't see what harm could result ?
 

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Basically a cars alternator can churn out higher voltages the faster the engine turns over when running, upto 35v, cars regulators are stronger than a bikes. You may get away with this a few times but there have been numerous instances where people have cooked their bikes electronics just doing that. It's not worth the risk.


....a bigger problem of course is accidentally reversing the leads.

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Sorry Tbirdnz, but the car's alternator is field regulated to output around 14V maximum, same as the Triumph's alternator & there's also a large 12V battery hanging off it which would take some time & likely have to boil dry before it could reach a terminal voltage of 35V ! This voltage could only happen in 'open circuit', no (or faulty) battery, & regulator failure to full field output conditions. There is no reason to suppose that such a failure will magically happen just because it gets parelleled with another vehicle's 12V/14V float battery supported power system. (The car's alternator has a bigger output capability of +current+ not voltage & that power will not flow unless the +load+ demands it.)

....unless as you say the jump leads are connected wrong way round :D then all bets are off....

Although the original starter of this thread seems to have gone awol, I wouldn't want him or other's thinking they've trashed their bike's electronics by simply jumpstarting from another 12V vehicle (correctly functioning) whose engine happened to be running. I agree it's not needed to run that engine (& better not to, taking a precautionary principle) as the battery is plenty big enough on it's own on any car.

The electronics failures you refer to must have some other cause tho' which confusingly manifest around the same period as work/remedies being tried. (Murphy's Law, 3rd corollary...)
Usually when a jump start is needed it's because something is already faulty.

For example, if the bike's alternator regulator has failed giving maximum field excitation output, the battery will hold down the circuit voltage for a while until it 'boils' dry. If this is not realised the next attempt to start the bike see's a 'flat' battery (lost half it's fluid, say). So it get's jumpstarted, jump leads removed, bike battery finally gives up, goes high internal resistance, alternator still trying to whack out full volts (because regulator had failed to full excitation), circuit voltage rises to level determined by alternator magnetic saturation limit (level similar on both large & small alternators) which is usually enough to cook & fail vehicle electronic units after a short period depending on prevailing ambient temperatures......

Not trying to start an argument here - just spread a little light on things :)

(I've a BSc in electronics & used to work on standby (battery back-up) power systems & motor drives, quite a few years experience in the 'Power Electronics' field....)
 

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Sorry Tbirdnz, but the car's alternator is field regulated to output around 14V maximum, same as the Triumph's alternator & there's also a large 12V battery hanging off

Acknowledge this Mike, I know the cars output is 14.2v as you say and that we are talking of larger amperage/hour batteries in cars and you can look on the web and see there are different schools of thought on this. If the output is around 14v then I agree it doesn't matter where the source comes from and from an efficiently working vehicle system that's what it would be.

Most likely most people have cooked their electronics by being a little clumsy with the leads or the possibility of a car whose output has exceeded that. In which case the car is eventually going to have problems but a bikes weaker charging system would feel it first.


....do you buy that ? :D


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Discussion Starter #15
I am still here. I haven't had a chance to work on the bike till today. I will snap some pics and post them. I have the factory circuit diagram in color. It was in the owner's handbook. I will post an update tonite. thanks,vince.
ps. anybody live in california near san luis obispo?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
when I changed the rectifier I probably messed with the ignitor pickup.
I am going to purchase the haynes manual to see how to make the adjustment. Because it was running before I changed the rectifier.
 

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I put my voltmeter to check the wires coming from the ignition pickup. There was no change in voltage or amps while cranking. I would assume there should be some reading? Thoughts anyone.
 

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Most likely most people have cooked their electronics by being a little clumsy with the leads or the possibility of a car whose output has exceeded that. In which case the car is eventually going to have problems but a bikes weaker charging system would feel it first.


....do you buy that ? :D


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Ride on ! :)
Sure, clumsy lead handling & dodgy batteries & battery connections could easily cause problems & it's quite likely bike electronics are less robust toward volage spikes/surges. The bike manufacturers have long known that their sales figures are much less affected than their car counterparts for design/quality issues. (A lot of recent BMW buyers are finding that out ;))

So, moving on....:D
 

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I put my voltmeter to check the wires coming from the ignition pickup. There was no change in voltage or amps while cranking. I would assume there should be some reading? Thoughts anyone.
The voltmeter would need to set on an AC volts range as I'd expect the pickup to give a pulse output. What it would actually read would depend on the response/impedance characteristics of the meter. It's a narrow pulse so I wouldn't expect much. (Nothing at all on a DC range.) Looking across a coil primary would show a higher reading, but start on a high range (say 200V) first as always when testing for a somewhat unknown signal. There's a resistance check in the Haynes manual for the pickup, around 500 ohms IIRC.

Have you followed the 12V through the ignition switch to the ignitor & coils etc. ? (Ignition on, cranking/not cranking?) And earth connections, engine/frame/ignitor ? The big crimp lugs ok at the battery & the one at the alternator mounting bolt ? Any significant volt drops anywhere ? Any connector block terminals loose or dislocated ? (Check those in the headlight too.) Maybe go back & check the fitment/connections of the new regulator/rectifier?
 
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