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Discussion Starter #1
I'm going to post a few how-to type messages here for dealing with common problems on the 955 Sprints.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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Discussion Starter #2
955 Fuel Connector Replacement

Triumph recalled the fuel quick disconnect fittings on the 955s due to failures some time ago, but somehow got away with only replacing the male fittings on the hoses, not the females on the tank. It's a very common story now: "I just picked up this nice 955 for a song, but the first time I pulled the tank off fuel started shooting all over as soon as I turned it on." The solution to this is to replace the plastic parts on the fuel pump plate with metal parts from Colder, AKA CPC. These are available in the US from Colder, QuickCouplings.net, and Amazon. Last I checked, Colder listed distributors worldwide on their web page.

Here are part numbers and instructions I wrote recently; this applies to all 955 Sprints:

The hose clamps are reusable, once you've figured out how they work. They also fit the space between the tank and bodywork much better than jubilee clips would, so it's best to reuse them.

LCD10004BSPT replaces the upper fitting on the fuel pump plate. Remove the pump plate the day before, if you can, and heat up the fitting in the plate to see if you can loosen the locking compound. Then disassemble the fitting (push the release in, push the pin down, then slide the release all the way out, watching for the spring that will attempt to launch the pin.) Use a socket to attempt to remove the plastic fitting from the pump plate. If you're lucky, the fitting will unscrew in one piece and that's that. You won't be lucky, though, and the fitting will break in half. The outer part will be in the socket and the threaded part will still be in the pump plate. At this point, you'll want to grab a large, cheap, flathead screwdriver and heat the blade 'til it's glowing dull red. Immediately plunge into the remains of the connector and allow it to cool, then attempt to use this to remove the rest of the connector. Repeat until successful or until there's nothing left to grab onto. Clean the threads with a pick, then prepare to install the new connector. Disassemble it, preferably inside a plastic bag so the spring and pin are retained even if they go flying. Wrap the threads with ~2.5 turns of Teflon tape. Screw the new fitting into the pump plate and tighten it until it's well seated and the hole for the pin is at the front. Reinstall spring, pin, and release into the fitting; the release should be at the rear.

LCD17004 replaces the connector at the end of the hose on the bottom of the pump plate. Loosen the hose clamp and move it to the other end of the hose, remove the old fitting, install the new fitting, ensuring that the release points to the outside, put the hose clamp back in place, tighten it.

LCD23004 and LCD 23006 replace the connectors on the fuel lines. This is not necessary if these connectors are aluminum, which they should be as there was a recall on them. If they are plastic and it is necessary to replace them, just remove the old ones one at a time and match the sizes; I forget which one is larger and which smaller. The Triumph aluminium connectors are nice here, as you can tell which hose is which and keep them set up to flow from right to left as intended, but it doesn't really matter much which is which as reversing the hoses just reverses the direction the fuel flows through the rail and the practical effect of that is not noticeable.

The 90º elbow at the lower hole in the fuel plate is made of much more durable material and usually doesn't break, but it does sometimes; I've only had to replace that once on four bikes. If you do need to replace it, it's a 90º male 1/4" BSPT x 6mm hose barb. I ordered some brass ones from China to have for spares, but I know one of our members here in the US sourced the plastic ones from Australia.

As long as we're discussing the fuel system and hoses, let me note that the external hoses are SAE J30R9 injection hose, and the three small pieces of hose inside the tank are J30R10 submersible injection hose. Replacing these hoses with lower spec can have disastrous consequences. Using regular hose inside the tank will just make the bike stop running when it splits, but using regular hose externally could easily cause a fire.

Cheers,
-Kit
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Remote Fuel Tank Kit for 955 TB Sync

Syncing throttle bodies on the 955s can be made a lot easier with an extension kit for hooking up the fuel tank while it's off of the motorcycle, and Triumph sells a kit for just that. Part number T3880127 is the one, but its $238 price is freakin' ridiculous. Here's what you need to build your own minimum-spec version:

(2) Colder APC22004 male QDs (~$1.00 each)

(2) Colder APC17004 female QDs (~$1.50 each) (Upgrade to PLC17004 for about $5 more apiece if you want metal tabs)

4-6 feet of 1/4" fuel hose. I just used whatever I had lying around, as even non-injection hose will probably stand up to 42 PSI for 20 minutes once or twice a year, but you really probably should buy the proper stuff and I said so so you can't sue me.

For the electrical connectors, you need the following:

Sumitomo 2P110 set (male and female) to extend the fuel sender line (~$3.00)

(1) 2P090WP-DL-F-S 2 position Sumitomo female connector ($3.00)
(1) 2P090WP-DL-M-S 2 position Sumitomo male connector ($3.00)
(These extend the fuel pump connector)

I just used black and red 18 gauge wire I had in my toolkit; no need to match the factory colors or anything. 18 ga is probably overkill for this, but it was the smallest I had.

Total cost should be around $20; easily worth it if you'll have the bike for a few years.

Cheers,
-Kit
 
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