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I'm interested in saving the maximum weight and removing the cat yet haven't seen much if any full exhaust systems available, are there any? And a follow up question would anyone here know and possibly tried a full exhaust off a Daytona 675 on their 765 Street Triple?? In either case a remap would be built btw.

So I asked Moto Mummy the following


I have a 2018 Triumph 765 Street Triple RS and I am interested in a pipe like there's yet they claim for this bike its a "de cat system". To the best of my knowledge on this bike the cat is located in the headers and not removable could you confirm if that is the case or if by chance I'm guessing here that their instruction indicate to cut it off in some way???


And received this answer




Austin Racing responded to my email and stated the Cat box simply unclamps/unbolts from the header and install the GP3 De-cat. its a Very easy fitment according to Austin Racing.


Since Triumph does such a poor job of making their oem parts diagrams available I find this hard to confirm. For anyone here who has first hand experience with where are cat live and if it can be easily removed as they say it can,
please chime in.
 

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So in looking at my bike closely, I don't think the 765 is going to allow an 'easy' de-cat. You'd have to actually cut the pipe at the junction of the three headers and go from there. The cat is integrated into the 3-1 junction portion of the system.
 

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Is the expense and potential harmful effects to fueling, and what you would have to do - piggyback device/dyno runs - to correct it really worth it? Are you racing it, and looking for tenths, or even hundredths of seconds?

Maybe just find a nice slip-on and go on a diet?
 

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There seems to be a lot of confusion around this catalytic converter business, so I thought some photos might help clear things up.

This is the stock muffler. All of it is muffler. There is no catalytic converter inside that massive box. Removing it does NOT remove the catalytic converter. There seems to be a number of aftermarket companies claiming that removing that black box is the same as removing the cat. It is not. Frankly, they should know better.



Here's the entire 765 exhaust system running right to left (minus the very front and end, obviously, but all components are there). The catalytic converter is after the collector where the three down tubes converge to one and before the muffler clamp. On the 765, the cat is on the left side of the oil pan. On the 675, the cat is on the right side of the oil pan.



Looking closer, you can see the catalytic converter is welded in place, as a permanent component of the exhaust system. Fully removing it would require cutting it out of the header system and welding in a new piece of tubing to reconnect the headers to the muffler.



The only other way you can "remove" the cat (and this is obviously a bit foolish but it does work and people do it) is to shove a long, hard object into the cat and punch out the material inside and shake the contents out. A broom handle usually does the trick. Technically that is removing the cat and making an open exhaust system. Don't do this.

Will removing the catalytic converter save weight? Yes. A significant amount? No. You're better off skipping donuts.
Can you make more power removing the catalytic converter? Possibly. But it will take a fair bit of tuning and will require custom mapping and will only make a difference with a freer flowing muffler, air filter and probably headers to see the full benefits.

Long story short, you're best bet is leaving it alone. The engine is tuned with it in place and works best with it there. If you switch to a full exhaust system that eliminates it, that's a different story. But removing it from your stock headers is likely to do more harm than good and cause more frustration than the results are worth. Unless you're looking to squeeze every last ounce of performance out of the bike and are willing to put the time and money into it, then go for it. It's your bike, do what you want with it.

That's it in a nutshell. Hope this helps. If I missed something or got some info wrong, please chime in.
 

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But, I like donuts. :(
 
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Yeah...

So in looking at my bike closely, I don't think the 765 is going to allow an 'easy' de-cat. You'd have to actually cut the pipe at the junction of the three headers and go from there. The cat is integrated into the 3-1 junction portion of the system.
It's also too bad folks seem to not be able to understand a fairly clear statement (which I made above, and which others, like Kawabunga, have said on other threads).

What I said in the earlier post is no more or no less than what Kawabunga had to document and photo and etc. etc. to illustrate.
 

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Oh, gotta say - love this bike. It winds up so freakin' nice....and the response is so freakin' smooth...

I wouldn't mess that up with sawing off the cat....not on your life...
 

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Fizeram o "De-CAT"? Qual o impacto? Algum problema? Ficou barulhento?

Did you do "De-CAT"? What is the impact? Some problem? Was it noisy?
 

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Reminds me of when I was really into rock climbing. I asked a guy at the gym what he thought was the best thing I could work on to get better. His response, "Lose 10 lbs." :D. I wasn't a huge guy, but he's right, 10 lbs later and my rock climbing was much better.
 

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It is probably worth mentioning now that the information regarding the catalytic converter in this thread applies ONLY to the first generation 765. The second generation, released in 2020, has two catalytic converters. One of which is found inside the muffler, I believe. Again, the post I made above (post #4) regarding where the cat is on the 765, applies only to the 2017-2019 model years.
 

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It is probably worth mentioning now that the information regarding the catalytic converter in this thread applies ONLY to the first generation 765. The second generation, released in 2020, has two catalytic converters. One of which is found inside the muffler, I believe. Again, the post I made above (post #4) regarding where the cat is on the 765, applies only to the 2017-2019 model years.
Did someone confirm that ? I Just bought a 21' 765RS and thinking about SC Project slip on. In fact, if it's like stated above, just by changing end muffler i have to remove one of catalytic converter, i will not be happy to do it.
 

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I can’t confirm it by personal experience, but I remember reading that to meet Euro 5 emissions, Triumph had added a second catalytic converter, located in the muffler. If you Google you can probably find the articles that describe the Euro 5 changes to the 2020+ models.
 

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Did someone confirm that ? I Just bought a 21' 765RS and thinking about SC Project slip on. In fact, if it's like stated above, just by changing end muffler i have to remove one of catalytic converter, i will not be happy to do it.
If you add slip-on, only one catalytic converter remains at the end of the headers (see picture above), to have a full system (no catalytic converters) you need to change also the headers.
 

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They made 2 smaller cats instead of one big one, i remember the engineer saying in a video. One is in the header behind the collector, and one is in the breadbox. Doing a "slip-on" removes one of the 2 cats. They said they did the 2 smaller ones to improve airflow. I almost hate messing with it at all, i just want some more volume and bassy tones so that's why i ordered the yoshimura AT2.
 

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If you add slip-on, only one catalytic converter remains at the end of the headers (see picture above), to have a full system (no catalytic converters) you need to change also the headers.
Yep, but my point is to not remove catalytic converters. I do not want to make additional remapping etc. Question now is, it will be needed to remap after changing only slip on.
 

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I put a full system on my Daytona track bike. No amount of PC tuning brought back the mid range and it didn't add much top end. I put the cat back.
 
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