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Not trying to pick a fight with anyone, there are many on this forum who have forgotten more than I know. I only have my own experience to go on. That said, replacing the inner grommet is all that is required to prevent your leak. The small grommet is to protect the leads from the sharp edges of the case. You could be riding your bike right now without a 24 hour waiting period....
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Not trying to pick a fight with anyone, there are many on this forum who have forgotten more than I know. I only have my own experience to go on. That said, replacing the inner grommet is all that is required to prevent your leak. The small grommet is to protect the leads from the sharp edges of the case. You could be riding your bike right now without a 24 hour waiting period....
So you're saying my fix is more than adequate? :unsure:
 

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So you're saying my fix is more than adequate? :unsure:
Yes, I think that using a silicone around the outer stator wire grommet is a fix if you do not wish to pull the primary cover off and replace the inner grommet. IMO the correct and better fix is to replace the inner grommet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Hi,

Absent any text with these two photos., the two wires out of the primary connect one to each of the reg./rec. Yellow wires, doesn't matter which to which.

I've sent you a PM as well.

Hth.

Regards,
Thanks mate! I was planning to add text later once I could with something other than my thumbs.
 

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Hi
(Only) If you have enough spare length in the wire, you might want to consider cutting the wire back a little before you fit the connector. The wire ends look pretty badly oxidised, if the oxidation has travelled too far up the wire, then try to clean it before fitting the terminal. It is quite hard to do mechanically on stranded wire, using a solder flux cleans but leaves an acid residue that can cause more problems than the oxide if not completely removed or neutralised.
This wire is subject to a constant high amperage any high resistances can cause overheating or low charge rate.

best regards
peg
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Hi
(Only) If you have enough spare length in the wire, you might want to consider cutting the wire back a little before you fit the connector. The wire ends look pretty badly oxidised, if the oxidation has travelled too far up the wire, then try to clean it before fitting the terminal. It is quite hard to do mechanically on stranded wire, using a solder flux cleans but leaves an acid residue that can cause more problems than the oxide if not completely removed or neutralised.
This wire is subject to a constant high amperage any high resistances can cause overheating or low charge rate.

best regards
peg
Before I tore it apart to replace the inner and outer grommet, I took it out for a spirited run and a cylinder was cutting out under heavy load. 4k rpm climbing to 65-70mph is where it was happening. Carb or ignition? I'm still breaking in a top end rebuild. Right plug had some black soot, left plug was brown when I pulled them. I could definitely see an issue with the resistance in this wiring show up like that, but it would be affect both plugs, right?
 

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Regarding the misfire, i would suspect the plug cap and the connection of the HT to the coil first. Then consider changing the plugs. Check these first.
 

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Hi Rafterman, You can replace connectors with any type you choose. Ones that fit through the wire bore in motor are advisable. The Lucas bullets need soldering or crimping. If crimping you need the real crimper. Britishwiring.com sells bullets C314. These can be soldered or crimped. All the crimp on can be soldered. Solder on cannot be crimped properly. I've soldered this several times, before I bought crimpers. C314 solders easier that solder on due to the smaller bore.

I find the electrical solder sold Ace Hardware Alfa # 13463 (361f), or # 13460 (374F) rosin core works quite well. A wash between them, but 13463 is a tad easier to use.

If you cannot get clean copper you have no choice but to flux. Alpha Soldering Paste Flux. I've been in the place where it is impossible to trim to clean copper many, many times. Rosin would not stick. I've had to apply Alpha flux. Then used rosin core solder. Has lasted over 20 years in multiple cases. But indeed is not best practice. I clean the paste flux off with shot of carb cleaner & rag after soldering. No need to remove rosin flux. Whatever, do not use liquid acid type flux. Way too strong & very corrosive long term. Nocorrode flux is common in plumbing work USA. It works, but again clean it off. Don't use lead free pipe solder.

Cut wire sleeve back such you can fold the connectors back to pass through case.

Those don't look too bad. You could try cleaning with carb spray & rag, then attempt solder. Or cut wires about 1/6-1/8" back, strip & see what you get. Where you are now I'd take jacket back about 3/16-1/4" to get a little more folding room to pass through case. Solder will run under insulation to a degree & prevent bending. Luckily oil leaks often get on this connector & reduce corrosion. Solder on is less vibration resistant.

Is modern crimp on bullets better option if you don't mind non original? Probably?
Don
Don
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Wow, again, thank you all. Great insights. I will clean them up and take another picture for the communities inspection! Cheers!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Follow up question unrelated to regulator wire grommet. What is the screw/thread size for the front brake caliper cover? I have the cover, but screws have been lost to the horde.
 

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Hi Rafterman,
I would use copper slip or the equivalent anti-seize on these to future proof removal.
The heads can break off just by thinking about undoing them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
Ok... over all update: Went the route of replacing the inner and outer grommet. Put about 10 miles on it and it's dry as a bone. New issue: These dang throttle cables. If I pull up too much slack in them, it starts pulling up the slides to where they are off the idle screw thus stuck in a high idle. With a little slop in the cables outer casing (1/8 in) and a "loose" cable feel, I can get a decent idle, but now the cables are sticking somewhere in the throttle/upper adjusters every time you twist the grip (at about 2k rpm). I say they are sticking on the upper adjusters based on that seems to be the point where I can most easily free them when they are stuck. Cables are not bound anywhere to the bike, they are loosely routed, free and big loops with no sharp turns.
 

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Hi Rafterman, Good on the alternator wire!

The throttle cables can be very frustrating sometimes.
Does your bike have the original junction box system, or 2 cables from double twist grip system?

Or is it actually in carbs? Rather than rpmI find it a little easier to diagnose by throttle position. Put masking tape on twist grip & twist grip casting. Mark tape 0, full. Then split marks in half until you have 1/8s. Gives an idea how far cable wire has moved when it doesn’t want to return.

I then remove cables open splitter. Look for edges that might catch in splitter. Very closely look for broken wire strand(s) all 3 cables.
A broken strand will fold up in housing & do odd things. Intermittent sticky or a little tight spot when turning throttle. Sure when really bad it’s easy. It breaks or binds bad & easy to find.

I would recommend take all 3 cables off. Inspect very closely, feel them on bench. If ok, lube them with very light machine oil. I like Singer sewing machine oil is my favorite. 3 in1 is ok, but it's thicker when the solvent evaporates.
For the splitter box (or tube if you have round one) very light grease from plastics is good. Alloy splitters any light grease is fine. A thin smear. Sewing machine oil seems ok here also.

To lube cables I take a baggie. Cut corner off. Stick cable in hole & tape the baggie to cable with electricians tape. With a bent wire hang cable from rafter/joist in garage. Put some oil in baggie & let it run in through cable overnight. Remove baggie & hand cable several hours, or a day or so to let excess oil out. This tends to wash a little dirt out also. All 3 cables. Then readjust all cables as needed.

The 1/16-1/8" cable play at carb after setting idle hot is good.

Your top hat or adjuster on carb top should be correct for cable version you have. I know the cable doesn't go straight up, like we'd like, but it's what it is & do best you can on routing.

All you can do with slides is carefully feel them for binding. However when hot things can change. Often unless you find fraying inner wire or the cable housing is obviously kinked, it really gets down to a bit of trial & error.

By time your done messing around getting everything inspected, lubed, adjusted you spend most of the day, not including hanging the cables to lube. With practice it gets easier. Way easier.

By the way how did the PRT resealing go?
Don
 
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