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Discussion Starter #1
Posted a few questions on this already, but figured it would be easier (and more helpful for others) to put them in one place. The bike is a 1973 basket case that's been sitting in a garage for 29 years with a blown piston. Top end removed, side covers missing, no signal lights, bodged wiring, etc. First Triumph and first time I've done a bottom end rebuild, should be fun. It'll be slow going since I'm also working on a 1973 R75/5 BMW project.

I've gone as far as pulling all the side covers. Side note for other noobs: shift the bike into a high gear before you remove the gear box cover, you'll need to lock up the engine with the back brake later.

Question for today - I found a small amount of water behind the gearbox cover, and surface rust and gunk on the clutch lever and kick starter assembly. I'd guess it wicked down the clutch cable over time. Aside from replacing the spring and cleaning/de-rusting everything thoroughly, anything else to be done? Hopefully it didn't get inside the case, won't know until I get there but didn't see any water come out with the oil. Also the kick starter spring had snapped, so another thing on the parts list.
 

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It would be a good idea to replace the 4 springs on the gear shift in the outer cover.Grease them up when you fit them.Being so high,they only get oil if you lay the bike down on that side.Same lack of lube to clutch lever balls.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Got my clutch puller in the mail yesterday and had a few minutes last night. Went ahead and removed the cam and crank bolts, pulled the alternator, and pulled the clutch loose. And slammed my nose into the frame when it popped loose, dripping blood all over the timing chain. Thankfully my kids were asleep so didn't learn any new words. Looks like my small puller won't work for the timing gear, will make one from bar stock and hopefully get to it tonight.

The manual says to measure the clutch plates and compare to a new one. I don't have a new one, what should it measure?

Also, anyone know where I can download a manual I can print? The one on classicbike.biz is great but won't let you print, would be nice to have a copy in the garage.
 

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The manual says to measure the clutch plates and compare to a new one. I don't have a new one, what should it measure?
Different manufacturers have different thicknesses. The average is about .150" of friction material when new. Your friction plates will continue to work as long as there is material left on the plate. The manual is suggesting that you compare your used friction plate with a new one and decide whether you will be taking apart your clutch again before the material wears out to the metal. If you think you'll be back in the primary/clutch area before the material wears out, then leave them. I keep a spare used set with a reasonable amount of material left on them that I clean and exchange with the set on the bike about each season . Then I clean the ones I take off and keep them ready for next time I pull open the clutch.

P.S. Drag about the nose. :(
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Finally got back to the bike for a few minutes tonight, removing everything that could be removed from the left side. Slow but steady progress. Took a break on the Tiger to get the /5 ready for Barber, needed some long-overdue TLC before taking her that far. My first time to Barber, and while I didn't manage to find any Rats I did make out ok at the swap meet on Sunday.

Brought home various Triumph bits including carb rebuild kit, emgo air filter, solid state r/r, new bars, a couple of pullers, a mess of old SAE wrenches. Also a set of new old stock powermax pistons and Hastings rings. Do I need to do anything special to use them?
 
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