Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Since we are supposed to be quarantined, now is a good time to attend to my bike. (Not that it had been ignored mind you.) 2013 Bonneville Mag Wheel model.

I had read many posts that said the valves did not need adjustment at the 12k interval, so I didn't check them at that time. AND since the bike is still running GREAT with no loss of performance or fuel mileage, I just changed the air filter and kept riding. Of course oil and filter changes every 5k with synthetic oil too.

So at 24k, I want to check the valve clearance and adjust if needed. Requires a special tool, or a bolt to hold the cam gear in place. I don't have a lathe, so will likely go with a bolt. Suggestions for the right bolt? I was thinking an oval head to better hold in the 6mm hole. What length? Any other ideas?

Since this engine is considered pretty "robust" should I stick with OEM shims if needed?

Original spark plugs and fuel filter. I want to change those out. Just stick with the NGK DPR8EA-9 that I think it came with? Triumph if pretty proud of that filter! Is there a good substitute for that? Other than the filter and the pump gasket, what else should be changed while in there?

Best place to order these parts? There is a dealer about 30 miles away, but we are supposed to stay home. Not

TIA for your advise!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
953 Posts
Personally if the bike is running fine I'd keep it buttoned up until the Chinese flu passes and parts and labor is back up and running if needed. I have 18,000 miles on my 2015 Thruxton and haven't done the valve check yet but she's running like a charm and I'm going to keep riding her.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,417 Posts
You can check the valve clearances without pulling too much apart. You should get four new seals for the cam cover bolts, and DO NOT overtighten them when you reassemble.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
626 Posts
I agree with @Baltobonneville -- take off the tank, whip off the valve/cam cover, and check the valve clearances - they may well still be within spec and need no attention, and if they do need adjusting you'll see for yourself the holes to lock the cam gears in place... Just remember to stuff a rag into the cam chain tunnel - you really don't want anything dropping down there, and do not over tighten the cam cover bolts on re-assembly...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Here's what I've got;

Left intake is .20 and .18. Right intake is .20 for both. Yes, within spec, but should I shoot for midrange while I have it open? Does these valves tend to loosen or tighten?

Left exhaust is a slightly loose .30 and normal .33. One is out of spec. Right exhaust is .28 for both. Again, do these tend to loosen or tighten?

Shims come in .05 increments.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
My experience is that the clearence tend to tighten, exhaust at a much faster rate. I set mine to the maximum end of spec at about 15k miles. I never had to touch the intake again until 150k. I usually had to adjust an exhaust valve or two every 30k or so. The exhaust tightened up a total of about 0.5 mm total over that mileage, with the original shims all in the 3.00 range, and the latest ones all either 2.45 or 2.50.

The best price I've found for shims is a company that specializes in older Yamaha parts. Many older Yamaha use the same 25mm shims that our Triumphs use.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
715 Posts
As for the fuel filter, you need a metal bodied filter with 5/16 barbed ends. There's a thread on this board somewhere that has a Napa part number for a compatible filter. I got mine at a local auto parts store for less than $5. If you decide to replace the short pieces of fuel line that connect the filter to the pump, you need to get hose that's rated for submersion in gas. You can buy it by the foot on eBay or Amazon, I think it was around $15 or $20 for a foot of hose, which is enough to do the job 3 times over.

All that being said, I didn't change mine until 100k miles. My unscientific test (blowing through the filter by mouth) showed no detectable difference in restriction between the old filter and the new one. Only difference is that the old one tasted of gas! The filter I put in at 100k is still working fine today at 171k and counting. In my opinion, the 24k change interval isn't really necessary, unless you live on some third world country and purchase your fuel in buckets our of the back of a truck somewhere.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I probably banged on the cam cover more more than 1/2 hour...then got a heavier rubber mallet!

Thanks for the replies! I'm going to adjust the one exhaust that is at .33 and leave the rest alone. I used a 4mm x 20mm oval head bolt to hold the gears together. Seems to work just fine! Popped the shim out with compressed air.

I already purcha$ed the OEM fool filter, but I probably won't bother with any of that for many more years down the road. I just figured it would be a good idea that this point to get whatever stuff could be in there from the factory.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
My engine number is 7600315. I ordered the cam cover bolt seal for 456522> part #T1260337. I had to pry the old seal out, but the new seal just drops in. Is this correct, or did I get the wrong seals?

What is the twin-lip seal #T1260309?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10,417 Posts
It goes in easily, but it should be the full diameter. Metal side should be on top.

I don't know about the part numbers, but Triumph improved the seal at some point. I believe that others on this forum were recommending the new part, but you should be able to use either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
238 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
All back together. BUT, it was an exercise in futility.

One exhaust valve gap measured 0.33mm. The shim measured about 0.1125" with my micrometer (not metric.) I did a conversion that showed about 2.857mm.

According to BikeBandit's online OEM parts list, shims only come in .05mm increments. So I rounded the 2.857 to 2.85 to match what was available online. Adding .05mm gives a 2.90mm shim, and should get me 0.28mm gap. NOPE! I got .25mm, which is at the very tight end of spec.

Not happy with that, I found that Triumph does make shims in .025mm increments, but the vendors don't seem to stock those (in between) sizes. I can barely seen any numbers on the original shim, but it could be 2.875, which is pretty far off from what I measured. BUT it explains why going to 2.90 was too much. There is no other size that would reduce the clearance to somewhere mid-range.

Since the general consensus is that the valves tighen as more miles are driven, I put the original shim back in, measured .33mm and called it a day! New cam cover gasket and washers and buttoned it all up.

Spark plugs still looked just fine with 0.9mm gap and good color. Replaced those anyway. Replaced the fuel filter. Oil and filter and air filter in 500 more miles.

At least there is some peace of mind on what is going on inside the engine, etc.

Thanks!
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top