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Looking at the Triumph site, it appears that the 2018 through 2020 Street Triple RS bikes are running the same suspension components.

For those folks that do track days on them, did you change anything with the suspension? If so, what did you do that worked well?

Anyone swap for heavier springs to get it dialed in for your weight?
 

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I am 80 kgs and after taking the bike to a suspension place to have it dialled in for me I found it great on the track. I am not riding at the top of the fast group though (more like middle of the intermediate) so depending on your skill level you might need firmer springs.
 

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It depends more on his weight than skill level. But, I agree he should get the stock suspension set up properly first and see how that works.,
 

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Hi there,
I have a 2019 RS. Took it to the track in October 2019, for the first time.
I had the suspension on my bike sat up at the track, in northern California, by not other than Mister Dave Moss. How lucky am I .?...?!!!!, He sat my suspension throughout the day.
He would look at the tire and tell me exactly what was going on with the suspension, in addition to , if I had too much air or too little air in th tire. The tire getting too hot inside and too cold outside, etc. After each session.
I would come in and he would make the necessary adjustments.
By the end of the day I was riding faster, getting on the throttle sooner and with more confidence, because the bike would be predictable and move just the right amount under heavy braking and hard acceleration.
On the street, now, the bike is really nice to ride. Not too harsh not too soft.
With the original springs for my 157 lbs without gear. Riding on the B (advanced group).

I hope this help you getting your bike's suspension set up for your weight and riding style.

Safe rides!!
 

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Easy and cheap first, set the sag. Then work on one end at a time, making sure you write down all your beginning settings. Work on one damping setting at a time and keep very precise notes. Patience and a rough road are your friend.
 
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