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Can anyone help please with any advice on how to remove a brake pad securing pin, where the 5 mil hex key fitting has been slightly rounded off and the key won't grip properly without slipping. I've got one of the pins out with the 5 mil key, but the other is proving a real pain and I don't want to completely round off the inner section. Thank you
 

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You could try a differenet snug-fitting 5mm key with a flat (not rounded) end, if you haven't done so already. Some owners have had success with banging (jamming) in a slightly oversize torx bit and use that to get it out. Do a search, there are threads on this forum about this issue.

Always use anti-seize on the threads when you reassemble these, and don't over-tighten them.
 

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Some heat might help break it free as well.

I had one rounded out completely. I brought the caliper to a shop, a place attached to the motorparts store that turns rotors, etc. He got it out for $35 if I remember correctly. Well worth it. Especially since a replacement caliper is very expensive. I like doing things myself, but there's a time and a place for letting an experienced guy take on the job.

I replace my pins about every-other-time. Recently someone around here posted some pics of replacement titanium pins. I might use those next time. The OEM ones are too soft.
 

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Chain spray is usually good enough for anti-seize and may help the new pins not to stick in the aluminum
Found this item about galvanic corrosion - an interesting read
From what I can tell, all the screws and bolts on the bike were assembled nearly dry, so whenever you take something apart, it's well worth putting anti-seize on. It helps break that galvanic couple - which, per the chart in the link, will be slightly greater with Titanium. (larger delta V).

I wonder if 1 wrap of PTFE tape would work as well??? Have not thought that thru yet.
 

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Backing one of the screws pinching the forks into the triple tree ... it took all the threads out with it. Think it was that galvanic corrosion thing.

Another case of hiring a guy with skills. Brought the top plate to a machine shop and he was able to clean it up and re-thread it for a larger screw. Forget what it cost, but a lot less than a new top plate. Even if you can find a used one that's not bent.

That was kinda a fun visit. I looked around the guys shop with a bit of awe and said this place is cool. He said a bit too eagerly "you want to buy it?" Heh, not sure if he owned the business or if it owned him.
 

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On a rear pin last season before I set off on a 10,000 km cross continent trip, I had to drill into the pin hex head to weaken the walls of the pin head, then hammer in an Easy-Out type of bolt remover (this one was square cross sectioned and sharp corners to bite into walls). This, with plenty of heat, got it to crack loose. No harm done to caliper hole thread. New pins installed with anti-seize.
There are stainless and/or titanium pins to be had for these calipers.
 
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