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Discussion Starter #1
Hello folks,

I'm a new member here but riding bikes for many years. I'm having some sleepless nights for a while because my '14 Scrambler denies to start.


Information about our patient:

- 2014 Scrambler EFI
- 40k kms
- Open pipes
- Regular maintenance by my compassionate hands since the day I bought it.

So the story goes:

After a long European trip that lasted 2 years I went back to my garage in Istanbul and poured my whiskey watching my stallion with delight (we all know that feeling). A couple of days later I started commuting around town and I suddenly realized it was squirting oil from the clutch cover. Then I thought it was good opportunity to install a new clutch kit (Yes Barnett with green springs) as I would have to remove the clutch cover to install a new gasket anyway. Then it turned out to be the perfect opportunity to actualize all those customization fantasies. Required parts gathered and the whole teardown process began.

I applied all of those "40k servicing steps" written in that holy book of Haynes manual + made some mods:

Maintenance:
- Fork oil change
- Swingarm pivot lubrication
- Brakes renewed with steel braided lines, new pads, new brake fluid and overall caliper cleaning.
- Engine oil + oil filter change
- New Spark Plugs
- New Battery

Mods:

- Removed the air injection system, plugged the electronic eliminator and used the existing air tubes that goes down to exhaust port by chopping them. ( I welded the top of the tube so they look and work like a bolt now.)
- O2 sensor removal, plugged the ports on the exhaust tubes with the bolts that come with the removal kit.
- Installed the Barnett Clutch kit with heavy duty green springs.
- Wider handlesbars.
- Custom made longer clutch cable to play along with the wider handlebars.
- Airbox removed. (Gonna build a new air intake system, thats my fantasy)


The bike was running just fine (except the oil squirt from the clutch cover and probably the loud backfiring caused by those open pipes....which I adore) when I parked the bike in the garage. The bike sat there for almost 6 months long, with gas in the tank and then another 6 months without the gas tank (I brought the tank in my room next to my bed, we slept together every night).


After all those time spent in the garage pieces were back together and it was time start the bike, but things went unexpectedly.

Here are the steps I followed:

1) Connected all the hoses, battery etc. First attempt to start the engine; funny sound came from the fuel pump (that's ok), engine cranked fine but no ignition.
2) Drained the old gasoline, refilled the tank with fresh gas, turned the ignition on, funny fuel pump noise again, engine cranked, no ignition. I then removed the fuel hose to check if the fuel pump works, I pushed the starter button and there was a pressurized gasoline flow coming out from the fuel hose. So the fuel pump works. Not sure if that works within the required psi range, but I think so...
3)Unplugged and checked the spark plugs if there was ignition, and there was on both of them.
4)Sprayed starter fluid from the carb-like throttle-bodies this time, there was ignition but the engine didn't run much longer after a few "pop!-popa!-pop!s" So it ignites the fluid, which means there is ignition.
5) After almost 6 attempts (each lasting about 7 seconds of cranking) I decided to nose around the exhaust but my super sensitive nose couldn't catch any trace of gasoline there. Hmm...So there is something wrong with the fuel injection is said to myself. There is compression and spark but no gas in the cylinders.
6) Plugged in the fault code reader (not the genuine Triumph diagnostic tool) and it indicated 2 codes: P0201 (Haynes Manual says: Injector cyl 1 circuit fault - misfire =open circuit, flooding = short circuit) and P0202 (Injector cyl 2 circuit fault - misfire = open circuit, flooding = short circuit).
7) Grabbed my phone desperately and started to search if some of our brothers ever had a similar issue before on this forum. Some said the ECM could be the key. Or the MAP sensor. So I did a quick voltage test but everything seemed working just fine. I opened the throttle body caps (those chrome ones) in order to reach the injector connection and unplugged the MAP sensor to check it as well.
8) I tried cranking it once again, no chance.
9)Plugged the fault code reader, and this time there were 3 codes; P0201, P0202 and P1688 (MAP sensor cyl 2 high voltage) It was the MAP sensor cyl 2 which I unplugged before the fault code check so I think thats why the third code showed up.
10) Called a mechanic friend who mainly works on KTM's, he told me to plug in the code reader and delete all the codes to reset the ECU. I did. Pushed the starter button again engine cranked, still no happy ending.
11) I kissed my bike, left the garage went back home and poured my whiskey.. I listened The Road to Hell by Chris Rea.

I'm having a sleep disorder because of this and I need your help folks. This bike was running like a beast before I put it down in the garage. I may have denied the very essential rule of "if it works, don't touch it" (I know, I drive a '67 Willys Jeep on a daily basis) but really wanted that upgrades and actually enjoy every single minute I spend working in my companion.

I'm looking forward for any suggestion that can bring my beast back to me. Please help.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks a lot for the suggestion mike-tt special, I checked the connections but everything seems to be just fine.

I talked with the Triumph service and they told me that the issue may be the ECU... That doesn't make any sense to me, this motorcycle was running well. I also had removed the ECU and kept it in my house in a safe and dry place. The only variance in its life was staying in the garage a year long with airbox removed and the overall 40.000kms maintenance.

The fault code reader says the problem is about injector 1 and injector 2.
The absence of the gasoline odour from the pipes even if the engine cranks indicates that no fuel is injected into the cylinders.

I think maybe the injectors got clogged or somehow they can not operate mechanically, but can not figure out why? Can they get stuck after not operating for a year? This bike is not vintage, I don't think a bike that is 40.000kms/5 years old should get "rusted" just because I didn't ride it for 12 months.

I'm thinking about removing the throttle body in order to get the injectors out and check them, clean them if necessary but it seems like I'm gonna need new o-rings for that and I'm not sure if I can get them from anywhere in a short span of time. (including the Triumph dealers, they are horrible here.) You think I should go that far?

Has anyone removed the injectors of a Scrambler/Bonneville/America before? What kind of job is that?
 

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Have the injector fault codes returned after you've cleared them?
Although blocked injectors are possible however unlikely that both would be blocked, I don't think that would cause a fault code, these will be generated due to open or short circuit on injector solenoid.
You say you had the ECU removed, have you double-checked the ECU plugs for any bent pins or any wires dislodged?
If you've got access to tune ECU it may be more helpful than just a proprietary code reader, you can check the the signals from every sensor on the bike and that may help pinpoint the problem.
Sorry I can't be any more help.
 

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Agree that is seems like a connection fault to injectors. I suspect something has been forgotten/missed in all the work you did. Not an actual breakdown. Could be the ECU isn't getting the proper OK to fire the injectors because of a missing/incorrect sensor readout (like the Airbox ambient air temp sensor etc).

Can you verify their function (more likely lack thereof) by doing the spray test outlined in the Haynes manual? What happens when you resistance test their connectors directly? What about when volts applied to their solenoids (should buzz or click open then closed when disconnected). Obviously protect from fuel spray/electrical sparks....
 

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Kickstand switch could be sticking too? Maybe its your battery. I've seen them crank an engine over but not have enough juice to get it running. Try using jumper cables connected to a car that isn't running.

Most likely you have gummed up injectors from sitting for so long. I'm not sure how to clean those maybe someone else can chime in
 

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I'd place money on nothing to do with bike sitting/bad fuel. Most likely a forgotten connection to a sensor or device and the ecu now refusing to trigger injection. You state a lot of mods. Didnt hear what you did about O2 fault code after removing them? You mentioned some kind of eliminator connected, for the SAI system disable or O2? There are products for both.
If ambient air temp sensor left off of knocked off after airbox changed this will lead to problems, maybe even no start. You might need to go backwards restoring what was changed until you find the issue.
Weird noise after fuel tank replacement is normal. Pump is pressurizing and purging air. Should stop within ten seconds or so.
You do need TuneECU (free) and correct cable ($20) to hook up a laptop and see all the live sensor readouts and make fuel map changes to suit your engine changes and even for basic maintenance like throttle balancing.

Got to learn to take fault codes with a grain of salt. Can be useful but can also just be symptom or side effect from a different disease.
 
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