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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All! I am popping in here, usually I hangout in the Thunderbird section. I am considering buying a used 2014 Bonneville for a second ride. It is decent looking, only about 3100 miles, but it looks like a lot of stuff has been altered. I am trying to get feedback on if it is worth it. It looks like the rear fender was cut down some, the turn signal lights and rear light were moved/made smaller, exhaust cut down. It has a aftermarket Corbin solo seat. Tires look original, so most likely need some soon. Wondering about thoughts, and if the rear springs look stock?

Thanks!
 

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Rear shocks are not stock, but that's probably a good thing. Plenty of threads about how bad the suspension is from the factory. I don't know anything about the Hagons, but they have to be better than the stock suspension. You probably need some information on what mods were done. I personally don't like buying modded bikes because I have to fix all the issues created by the modifications that affect the engine. If the exhaust was altered and they don't have the OEM parts still, then unless they loaded a proper mapping for the exhaust changes (which looks like the silencer was just removed to make it a straight pipe), the bike probably doesn't run right -- you need to find out what they did exactly. What are they asking for it?
 

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I have the exact bike. That looks like a British Customs tail tidy and turn signals. Looks like the airbox is removed too, which isn't a bad thing. I have the Hagons on mine too and am quite happy with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Rear shocks are not stock, but that's probably a good thing. Plenty of threads about how bad the suspension is from the factory. I don't know anything about the Hagons, but they have to be better than the stock suspension. You probably need some information on what mods were done. I personally don't like buying modded bikes because I have to fix all the issues created by the modifications that affect the engine. If the exhaust was altered and they don't have the OEM parts still, then unless they loaded a proper mapping for the exhaust changes (which looks like the silencer was just removed to make it a straight pipe), the bike probably doesn't run right -- you need to find out what they did exactly. What are they asking for it?
4500 but negotiable
 

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Turn signals are replaced, passenger pegs gone, side covers have been replaced. See if they have all the original parts
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Those straight pipes are going to be stupid loud, at least make sure you can live with the sound before pulling the trigger. Personally, I'd pass unless a proper rear fender and pipes were put back on it.
Supposedly the pipes have baffles. Yes I am going to see if they have original parts.
 

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see if the seller has all the pars that he's taken off.
The value of all those bits will soon add up to a tidy sum.
Certainly worth for bargaining ..
 

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I got a 2013 Bonneville three weeks ago and was almost dreading the first few rides as I had heard how supposedly awful the rear suspension was. However, after having done done over 600 miles, including three 120 mile round trips to my hometown and back, I can confidentially state that the rear suspension isn't as bad as everyone has made out.

Now obviously there are a lot of variables at play (rider weight, speed, road surface, riding style etc). Personally, I'm 5" 11 and weigh about 14 stone. The A-roads I used for my long trips had variable surfaces but the ride was extremely smooth and comfortable with the exception of a couple of big potholes which did bump me out of the seat a tad. No major drama and easily fixed by avoiding potholes.

I think rear suspension comfort also depends on what you're used to. For the past two years I've been riding a 125cc Bullitt Spirit. It is was fine for what it was, but now I have upgraded to Penny I couldn't be happier.

There are certain mods that a lot of Bonneville owners tend to do (ignition relocation, tail tody, air box removal). Some are functional, some are practical, some are to save weight and some purely aesthetic. However, kept stock or with a handful of mods the Bonneville is a great bike.

Mine only had 1397 miles on her, so was a real bargain. I say go for it. And should be fairly easy to change it back to stock if that's the look you want.
 

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If you like the way the bike is now with all the mods, it`s a good deal and go for it. Most the mods appear to be from British Customs. You`ll be saving a bunch of money if you are planning to make those mods to a stock bike.

If you don`t like the way the bike it now and plan to renew it to a more stock appearance, then it`s not such a good deal. If you want a stock bike with low miles, they can be found for around the same price.

How would you like your Bonnie to look? What mods are you looking for or do you just want a stock bike?

By the way, the exhaust will be a little loud but it will sound badass.
 

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I got a 2013 Bonneville three weeks ago and was almost dreading the first few rides as I had heard how supposedly awful the rear suspension was. However, after having done done over 600 miles, including three 120 mile round trips to my hometown and back, I can confidentially state that the rear suspension isn't as bad as everyone has made out.
I thought the same thing and rode the first two seasons with the stock shocks. I am glad that I waited, because I really appreciate the ride improvement I immediately felt when I did put the Hagon's on.
 

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I thought the same thing and rode the first two seasons with the stock shocks. I am glad that I waited, because I really appreciate the ride improvement I immediately felt when I did put the Hagon's on.
I see you're based in Canada. How many months a year can you actually ride?
 

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I see you're based in Canada. How many months a year can you actually ride?
Realistically, mid April to mid November. Some years it gets extended, some years it takes away. We have had a mild winter so far, so hoping we can get on the bikes early this year.

I guess you guys can manage to ride year round?
 

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Realistically, mid April to mid November. Some years it gets extended, some years it takes away. We have had a mild winter so far, so hoping we can get on the bikes early this year.

I guess you guys can manage to ride year round?
It depends on where on our fair island you live. Up north and in Scotland, they get much harsher weather than in London where I live. So I've been able to ride every day for the past two years. I've always said the only two times I won't ride is if there's ice on the roads or if it's really, really windy. And so far, London has never experienced either since I started riding. Guess I'm lucky.
 
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