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I agree about getting a bike that fits--very important--especially if you are a newer rider.

Here is my 2013 Thruxton in Brookland Green if you are still intent on the Thruxton:

 

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Opinions, opinions, opinions.

Sit on the new Thrux and you'll know in seconds whether it will work for you. It is not too heavy or too tight of steering- you have nothing to compare it to, so you'll be fine.

If you have the cash burning a hole in your pocket, don't let anyone here tell you whether to buy new or not. Buy what you want.

Get out, get used to it and enjoy it.
 

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I have a 2011 Thruxton and a 29 inch inseam. The bike is farly tall for me but I do OK with it, but I also have 42 years experience riding. I know what it feels like to get in a bad situation where you cannot touch the ground when you need to, also what it feels like to shell out several hundred dollars fixing the damage from a tip over. NOT GOOD!!! I think the power level of the Bonneville's are probably OK if you have good common sense but the height is the real issue. My brother and my nephew both have new Bonnevilles, one is the standard with mags, the other is the SE. The SE seems to have the lowest seat height of the two(its also the prettiest of the two. Just know that you will get in situations where you wont be able to touch the ground,( turning around on a steep hillside, etc) and it really sucks to see your pride and joy lying on its side on the pavement. I'd go for the Blue and white SE if it was my choice, nothing to keep you from cafeing it out. I feel your pain though, I would kill for a new ZX1400 Kawasaki but I need about 4 more inches of leg to keep from dropping it so I don't see that happening... Good Luck
 

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I'm 5'6" and bought my 2012 Thruxton over 6 months ago. I'm doing just fine with it as my first bike and have over 2000 miles on it. I can plant both feet if I really try but I'm fine on my toes. It is a heavy bike but you just have to treat it as one.


Sent from my Motorcycle iPhone app
 

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found this thread by accident really. BUT I had to reply. DO NOT listen to those who insist you buy a crap bike because you will drop it. Hell, don't buy one at all, you will drop it and die...and the sky will fall down and so on.
Going out with a defeatist attitude and actually expecting to drop a bike is one of the stupidest notions I have read.
Take training.
Practice
Listen to experienced riders and you will be fine.
Pete
23 years riding experience and NO dropped bike!
 

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You don't need to be flat footed on the bike... That's what Harley's are for. I'm 5'4 140 lbs and have a Bonne T100 that's been cafe'd, I have the suspension on the softest (and lowest) setting and even my legs feel too cramped. I've ridden the whole range of Bonne's and the Thrux and on all of the bikes I'm on the balls of my feet.

Every bike takes some getting used to, I came off my first streetbike which was a Suzuki SV650 and the Bonne at first felt slow and heavy compared to it and I wasn't quite comfortable carving around at first. But now it feels like a feather between my legs. I can throw it around in corners as easily and comfortable as I am on my dirtbike (which I've been racing since the age of 4).

Moral of the story- you're not too small... take it easy at first until you get the hang of it, then go have some fun. That's why we all started riding in the first place.
 

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sitting on a bike and riding a bike is two different beast. i would wait until triumph has a demo day and take the thrux and bonnie out for a ride to see which one you would think you would enjoy more. if you are going to ride long distances i would think the bonnie would be the choice.
 

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Opinions, opinions, opinions.

Sit on the new Thrux and you'll know in seconds whether it will work for you. It is not too heavy or too tight of steering- you have nothing to compare it to, so you'll be fine.

If you have the cash burning a hole in your pocket, don't let anyone here tell you whether to buy new or not. Buy what you want.

Get out, get used to it and enjoy it.
Couldn't agree more. The Thruxton is an awesome machine and difficult to resist. I understand if you are set on getting one. Do things at you own pace because only you know how fast you can progress. You stated that you took the safety course and I know they offer plent of good info. Follow your heart and do what makes you happy. I think you would be happy with any one of the mentioned bike but we shouldn't make that decision for you.
 

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Suzuki tu250x with a shaved seat:



While flat footing may be confidence inspiring, it is not necessary. Many ride unable only able to tip toe on ONE foot at stops.
 

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2013 Thruxton

You could get aftermarket springs to suit the Bonneville which are 20-25mm lower than the Thruxton and trust me you WILL want aftermarket springs - the standard items are woeful and have zero damping :( I've many years of riding experience and I think the engine is fantastic for newbies as it runs smoothly at low revs and has heaps of torque (not messing about changing gears gives you more concentration for the road :) ) Don't waste your money on a 250 - you'll be bored with it within a month and want to trade it. btw - I have the Brooklands green and love it :)
 

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alternatively, as others have suggested get the alloy wheel Bonnie and make some mods with the money you save on the original price. Might be an idea to keep the standard bars for a while as the taller wider bars make any bike easier to manoeuvre :)
 
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