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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,
I have a 2007 Speed Triple and it is riding pretty harsh right now. I am not sure what would be the best way to minimize the harsh ride, so I am open to suggestions. I don't want to pay for a respring right now because I don't ride it too much, but I would like to get the stock set up as well sorted as possible. I am 170 lbs and don't ride super-aggressively. Should I go with a lot of preload on the front/rear, or with just a little? Should I firm up the compression, the rebound, or soften them?

Any tips are much appreciated!
 

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Find someone who can set your suspension up. I have an 06 that use to ride harsh but after i set the static sag up on the suspension it is really good.
 

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I just took delivery of my 6th Speedy on Saturday. I have to do the same thing because she's wound a little tight.

This is what you have to do. Break out the owners manual and dial everything back to what the factory set it up with. That should be half the problem.
Front C: 2 R: 2 Preload: 3rd Ring from top
Rear C: 2 R: 2 Preload: Chances are the spring collar adjuster was never touched

Remember there are different types of harsh. 1: meaning hard and non absorbant 2: meaning the suspension moves so freely that it compresses too fast and rebounds even faster, making it harsh. You have to determine what harsh means; hard or too soft?

Once at the factory standard setting, your at the reccomended setting for a guy of your weight (175). Go for a ride on a bumby road that you have access to ride on again and again. Put a screw driver in your pocket. See how it feels (not the screw driver up your ass dummy). If still hard ; Stop and turn in the settings 1/2 clicks out all the way around. Try same bumpy road. It it's not enough, go another 1/2 click out. If however it gets too loose, your going the wrong way and the susp. is bottoming and rebounding too quick.

Turning the screw in lessons oil flow (slowing the suspension down). Turn the screw out opens the flow making the suspension quicker or speeding up action (possibly making it harsh).

Another way is to tie a ziptie around the inner fork tube just below the seal and drive over a bumpy road. If it moves down the entire travel of the fork then the compression is too fast (or lossened out too much). If you go over a bump and the compression soaks up the bump and the rebound is too fast, it will feel like a pogo stick after the wheel returns to the other side of the bump.

Its all about testing which takes a lot of time. It has to be balanced. But chances are if you start at standard and don't get much improvement with the clickers, then is is most likely the suspension just can't be adjusted with a screw driver......more likely its internally sucky!

Once you feel it, you'll be clicking like a fool...or you lose interest and sell me the bike for 3K so I can blow it out for 6........:cool:
 

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I just rode with a screw driver in my pocket and did tiny adjustments until it felt much better. It was a pretty big change (improvement) but it still isn't great.
 

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Tire pressures shouldn't be used to improve ride comfort, that is a work around, not a fix. Perform as stated above, or get it set up professionally. Just remember on the pre-11 bikes, the rear pre-load is non adjustable.
 

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Tire pressures shouldn't be used to improve ride comfort, that is a work around, not a fix. Perform as stated above, or get it set up professionally. Just remember on the pre-11 bikes, the rear pre-load is non adjustable.
LOL! (tire pressure)

My 2011 was set at 1.25 out front and 1.25.rear. The front should be 1.5 out soft. The rear soft setting is 2.5; thats twice out as much as set from factory (in the rear at least). There should be a noticible effect when I take it to my bummpy road....soon as it stops raining. These adjustments are so minor because of our lack of suspension travel. If you ever had a dirt bike, the clickers are adjustable up to like 20 clicks. With them, you move them 3-4 clicks at a time but with our bikes, just a smiggent will do it.

....all collar ring rear shock springs are usually adjustable but not mentioned in the manual ( thats why is unlikely that the previous owner touched it)
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thanks everyone. I have actually adjusted the rear shock (even though it isn't mentioned in the manual) and I reduced the preload by quite a bit. Should I have done this, or should the preload be relatively firm for the rear? Some say it is under sprung and some say it is over sprung.

Also, the rebound/compression adjusters don't have a lot of turns from all in. For instance, if I turn it 3 full times from all in, it would be all out. That is on ALL of the adjusters around the bike.
 

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Thanks everyone. I have actually adjusted the rear shock (even though it isn't mentioned in the manual) and I reduced the preload by quite a bit. Should I have done this, or should the preload be relatively firm for the rear? Some say it is under sprung and some say it is over sprung.

Also, the rebound/compression adjusters don't have a lot of turns from all in. For instance, if I turn it 3 full times from all in, it would be all out. That is on ALL of the adjusters around the bike.
I backed my preload nearly all the way off until i got the required amount of sag which surprised me....try backing your compression all the way off on the rear and go for a ride and see how it feels....this actually worked for my bike and i haven't felt the need to wind it back in at all...seems weird but it worked....i run the front preload stock for the road...just dialed in a little extra compression and rebound.
 

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You say that you reduced the preload.....did you turn the ring "in" compressing the spring or loosen it? Compressing the spring (making it shorter) increases preload. Preload is adjusted (or increased) from fully counter clock wise to clock wise. It is the amounty of thread left on the spring. I THINK it should be about 360mm (don't quote me)

That might be your answer, your adjustments are too far open & too fast, causing it to compress and rebound to the point of harshness.

Per my prior advice these clicker are adjustable in increments of fractions compared to a longer sprung bike.

START WITH THE OWNERS MANUAL and adjust in 1/2 turns or 1/4's.

As far as rear sag. is concerened; you should be able to pick the back end of the bike up a little while it is resting on the sidestand before the slack is taken up by your pull (before the tire starts to lift). If not, you have too much preload and the smaller adjustments for comp and rebound wont really matter. Its much more complicated then just described but a little free sag lets the tail end bounce up a bit before disturbing the chassis.
 

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You say that you reduced the preload.....did you turn the ring "in" compressing the spring or loosen it? Compressing the spring (making it shorter) increases preload. Preload is adjusted (or increased) from fully counter clock wise to clock wise. It is the amounty of thread left on the spring. I THINK it should be about 360mm (don't quote me)

That might be your answer, your adjustments are too far open & too fast, causing it to compress and rebound to the point of harshness.

Per my prior advice these clicker are adjustable in increments of fractions compared to a longer sprung bike.

START WITH THE OWNERS MANUAL and adjust in 1/2 turns or 1/4's.

As far as rear sag. is concerened; you should be able to pick the back end of the bike up a little while it is resting on the sidestand before the slack is taken up by your pull (before the tire starts to lift). If not, you have too much preload and the smaller adjustments for comp and rebound wont really matter. Its much more complicated then just described but a little free sag lets the tail end bounce up a bit before disturbing the chassis.
i loosened the collar on mine. it is way over sprung. ideally i would like to get a new spring and re valve the shock but thats just $$$ i dont have.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You say that you reduced the preload.....did you turn the ring "in" compressing the spring or loosen it? Compressing the spring (making it shorter) increases preload. Preload is adjusted (or increased) from fully counter clock wise to clock wise. It is the amounty of thread left on the spring. I THINK it should be about 360mm (don't quote me)

That might be your answer, your adjustments are too far open & too fast, causing it to compress and rebound to the point of harshness.

Per my prior advice these clicker are adjustable in increments of fractions compared to a longer sprung bike.

START WITH THE OWNERS MANUAL and adjust in 1/2 turns or 1/4's.

As far as rear sag. is concerened; you should be able to pick the back end of the bike up a little while it is resting on the sidestand before the slack is taken up by your pull (before the tire starts to lift). If not, you have too much preload and the smaller adjustments for comp and rebound wont really matter. Its much more complicated then just described but a little free sag lets the tail end bounce up a bit before disturbing the chassis.
I did reduce the preload a lot, by decompressing the spring. The spring was quite compressed when I got the bike and so I have decompressed it a fair amount because it seemed to ride really firm. On smooth roads it feels awesome, but on bumpy roads it feels pretty harsh. I guess I will keep tweaking the settings until I get something that works for me. I was just hoping someone on here weighed around what I weigh and could just tell me their setup.
 

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I did reduce the preload a lot, by decompressing the spring. The spring was quite compressed when I got the bike and so I have decompressed it a fair amount because it seemed to ride really firm. On smooth roads it feels awesome, but on bumpy roads it feels pretty harsh. I guess I will keep tweaking the settings until I get something that works for me. I was just hoping someone on here weighed around what I weigh and could just tell me their setup.
Back your compression all the way off on the rear.
 

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my 2011 came delivered in sport set-up (not standard). I opened the front 1/2 C & R, and opened the rear C & R 1 whole turn (speeding up the action) and it made A LOT of difference over sharp ruts and pavement height changes. Front is 2 out and rear is 2.5 out, but you have different suspension and/or valving on the 07.
 

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Like I said........:rolleyes:

Do yourself a favor and bathe the threads with WD-40 an hour before you touch the rings. They have a tendency to stick, causing you to mar the adjusters rings with your mallet (if not using a ring spanner)

Yes it is. That's what the big rings on the shock absorber are for... You need a C-spanner to work them.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Update: Ok before I rode in to work I went out and adjusted the compression on front and rear all the way out. Then I adjusted the rebound on front and rear all the way in, then half a turn out.

Result: much better! Much more supple ride and the really rough streets that always beat me up were not nearly as bad as yesterday. The bike doesn't feel quite as responsive, but I guess something has to give.

So, what should I do next to try to refine the settings? Should I add a bit of compression? Should I back off the rebound some more? Any thoughts from the suspension experts?
 
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