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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I've been reading this forum for weeks now, trying to learn as much as I can prior to asking repetitive questions that you've answered time and again, but I would love some advice please, because I haven't found the answers I was looking for - apologies if I've missed them.

TriumphRat is an amazing community from what I've read so far, so thank you for the value you're adding - I'm excited to be a Triumph owner.

This post will be 1 of 2, with this one being for the engine and gearbox. The next will be for the chassis and body work (to save confusion... for me mostly!).

Note: I'm based in Brisbane, Australia.

I've recently bought a 2003 Daytona 955i which has 56,000km, an unknown service history, as well as a broken 2nd gear. I know it starts and seems to run smoothly, but I want to service / maintain the bike fully before I even roll it out of the garage, so that I will have confidence in it for a number of years to come. My use for the Daytona will be for enjoyment! Commuting to work and weekend rides through our local mountains, limited to a few hours of riding. Generally good torque and fun in the corners, rather than high speeds is my desire.

Here's my plan: (very open to any advice or amendment of my thought-process)

1. Remove engine to repair the gearbox (I will clean up the chassis etc. while the engine is out, which I'll query in the next post)
2. Perform each item shown in the Scheduled Maintenance Chart of the Daytona 955i (pp59 & 60 attached below for reference)

Questions

1. Is there a guide or a forum post here that can help me with rebuilding the gearbox?
- The previous owner began the work on the gearbox, but ran out of skill; it's pulled apart. I'm happy to take it to the local shop, but I would like to understand the job before I make the decision on this, because I have an interest in doing as much of the work myself as possible.

2. With my desired riding style (cornering and torque rather than high speed), should I use the standard Daytona gearing? Or do you suggest a change? Is a simple front cog change sufficient?

3. Do I just change the 2nd gear only? Or do you suggest a full replacement of all parts

4. Re the full maintenance for a long and happy relationship with the bike, are the tasks shown in the Scheduled Maintenance Chart of the manual sufficient to give me confidence, given the kms and unknown service history? Or should I look at bigger things like new pistons / top-end rebuild? Anything else?
Note 1: although I'd love to rebuild the whole thing, funds and skills are reasonably humble, so hoping to do the most needed, rather than everything possible
Note 2: I'd prefer to do what I need to do while the engine is out, rather than putting it back together, then finding out I should have done XYZ (I appreciate I might be asking you to look into a crystal ball! Apologies)

Thanks in advance - I'm really looking forward to hearing from you.
 

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Good luck with the bike.
It's a great choice for torque and also a fun bike to ride on the twisties.

Personally, I would leave the gearing the same as it is fairly high geared and I like the lower revs when doing lots of miles, although, it has plenty of torgue to deal with the gearing.

Regarding other jobs to do, personally, if the engine is running, I would do a compression test first of all to see if you have any other issues.
If all the compression figures are good, i would leave the top end alone, particularly if you are on a budget. Although, that is just my personal opinion.
The gearbox is a pretty simple job and personally, I would try to get a complete gearbox second hand as the issue may be down to selector forks and gears.
Make usre you follow the manual for release and tightening sequences for bolts and particularly when refitting the engine as they have spacers on one side and if you get those wrong, the frame can snap.

Ian
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks a lot, Ian. This is great feedback. I’ll do that.

Good luck with the bike.

It's a great choice for torque and also a fun bike to ride on the twisties.



Personally, I would leave the gearing the same as it is fairly high geared and I like the lower revs when doing lots of miles, although, it has plenty of torgue to deal with the gearing.



Regarding other jobs to do, personally, if the engine is running, I would do a compression test first of all to see if you have any other issues.

If all the compression figures are good, i would leave the top end alone, particularly if you are on a budget. Although, that is just my personal opinion.

The gearbox is a pretty simple job and personally, I would try to get a complete gearbox second hand as the issue may be down to selector forks and gears.

Make usre you follow the manual for release and tightening sequences for bolts and particularly when refitting the engine as they have spacers on one side and if you get those wrong, the frame can snap.



Ian





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I have done this on my Sprint 1050 which I would say is nearly identical to the 955i.
Splitting the engine cases to access the gearbox is a nervous time but on reflection not a huge deal.
I definitely agree with Arai on his suggestion to do a compression and/or leakdown test on the assembled/running engine first to see what you have.
If those tests return good results then you're golden. You won't have to touch the head or pistons/rings. You should use a workshop manual though.

IIRC, I had to make a tool to remove the oil pump and another for the balance shaft. Be careful of the little filter in the sump, I damaged mine...You'll also need a clutch holding tool, torque wrench, gaskets for the engine covers and a new oil gallery O-ring.

Once you're in there with cases split, the tranny comes out very easily and is disassembled very easily. Make sure you have plenty of clean bench space to lay the parts out in order. A close inspection will identify which parts are damaged and need replacement.
I had the head off my 1050 and was doing all sorts of other stuff on the engine and decided to swap the 6th gear dogs to the new GT ratios for touring. If you follow the manual and stay organized you won't get into trouble. I think I had both the input and output shafts disassembled & reassembled several times and you'd be surprised how quickly it can be done.
The only other nervous task is re-joining the cases. You need to get the right sealant for this and there is a time limit so again, you must be organized. Another pair of hands for this task is very helpful. The trickiest part is applying the correct bead of sealant, just enough but not too much! The manual shows you where it goes.

Other good jobs to do while the engine is out you have already identified:
- frame cleaning
- engine cleaning
- valve clearance check/adjustment
- new spark plugs
- thoroughly clean cooling system
- service/clean swing arm & rear suspension components
Let me reemphasize a big tip tip from Arai. When removing the engine, take careful notice of all washers/shims that come out from each engine mount location, usually on the RHS and make sure they go back in the correct spot.
I would definitely recommend doing this job, you will save a fortune and demystify and learn a lot about your bike.
Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sussurf this is amazing, thanks, mate. I’ll follow your advice. Thanks again!

I have done this on my Sprint 1050 which I would say is nearly identical to the 955i.
Splitting the engine cases to access the gearbox is a nervous time but on reflection not a huge deal.
I definitely agree with Arai on his suggestion to do a compression and/or leakdown test on the assembled/running engine first to see what you have.
If those tests return good results then you're golden. You won't have to touch the head or pistons/rings. You should use a workshop manual though.

IIRC, I had to make a tool to remove the oil pump and another for the balance shaft. Be careful of the little filter in the sump, I damaged mine...You'll also need a clutch holding tool, torque wrench, gaskets for the engine covers and a new oil gallery O-ring.

Once you're in there with cases split, the tranny comes out very easily and is disassembled very easily. Make sure you have plenty of clean bench space to lay the parts out in order. A close inspection will identify which parts are damaged and need replacement.
I had the head off my 1050 and was doing all sorts of other stuff on the engine and decided to swap the 6th gear dogs to the new GT ratios for touring. If you follow the manual and stay organized you won't get into trouble. I think I had both the input and output shafts disassembled & reassembled several times and you'd be surprised how quickly it can be done.
The only other nervous task is re-joining the cases. You need to get the right sealant for this and there is a time limit so again, you must be organized. Another pair of hands for this task is very helpful. The trickiest part is applying the correct bead of sealant, just enough but not too much! The manual shows you where it goes.

Other good jobs to do while the engine is out you have already identified:
- frame cleaning
- engine cleaning
- valve clearance check/adjustment
- new spark plugs
- thoroughly clean cooling system
- service/clean swing arm & rear suspension components
Let me reemphasize a big tip tip from Arai. When removing the engine, take careful notice of all washers/shims that come out from each engine mount location, usually on the RHS and make sure they go back in the correct spot.
I would definitely recommend doing this job, you will save a fortune and demystify and learn a lot about your bike.
Good luck!





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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks again, Ian. I like the idea of a whole new gear box. Are the gearboxes the same across the model years? I'm assuming so. This would work?

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Triumph-Daytona-955i-T595N-Bj-2002-Gearbox-complete/283174939369?hash=item41ee8aaae9:g:uEwAAOSwwb1bprWV

Good luck with the bike.
It's a great choice for torque and also a fun bike to ride on the twisties.

Personally, I would leave the gearing the same as it is fairly high geared and I like the lower revs when doing lots of miles, although, it has plenty of torgue to deal with the gearing.

Regarding other jobs to do, personally, if the engine is running, I would do a compression test first of all to see if you have any other issues.
If all the compression figures are good, i would leave the top end alone, particularly if you are on a budget. Although, that is just my personal opinion.
The gearbox is a pretty simple job and personally, I would try to get a complete gearbox second hand as the issue may be down to selector forks and gears.
Make usre you follow the manual for release and tightening sequences for bolts and particularly when refitting the engine as they have spacers on one side and if you get those wrong, the frame can snap.

Ian
 

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Funnily enough I’m doing the gearbox at the moment. I’d say the actual gearbox is relatively easy because the shafts are just built up and there doesn’t seem to be the need to adjust clearance. Follow the manual and get things the right way round.
The trickier bit is getting to the gearbox. Things like pulling the liners and splitting the cases but there are a few threads on here for that.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Awesome. Thanks lot, mate.
Funnily enough I’m doing the gearbox at the moment. I’d say the actual gearbox is relatively easy because the shafts are just built up and there doesn’t seem to be the need to adjust clearance. Follow the manual and get things the right way round.

The trickier bit is getting to the gearbox. Things like pulling the liners and splitting the cases but there are a few threads on here for that.





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I tried to attach the PDF of the Triumph workshop manual for the 2002 onwards Daytona and Speed Triple bikes but file was too big. If you want to send me a private message with an email address Ill send it on to you if you've not got one

Regards

Rob
 

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Thanks again, Ian. I like the idea of a whole new gear box. Are the gearboxes the same across the model years? I'm assuming so. This would work?

https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Triumph-Daytona-955i-T595N-Bj-2002-Gearbox-complete/283174939369?hash=item41ee8aaae9:g:uEwAAOSwwb1bprWV
That should work mate. If I am not mistaken, the gearbox was changed for the 2nd gen engines, which would have been late 2001-2002 onwards.
I had been told that the Centennial edition was geared slightly higher, but I don't know if it was the same for later bikes.
I have a centennial and think the gearing is perfect on it.

Someone mentioned pulling the liners. This is not necessary as the top end can be left well alone as can the crank.

Good luck.
 

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Probably too late now, but I would disassemble the suspension linkages and check/lube/replace the needle rollers as necessary. It has likely it has never been done, and they can be rusty from water ingress. You can buy the bearings at half the Triumph price at a bearing specialist. Also, pull the rear axle and lube the roller bearing that supports the axle. You can re-use the 46mm nut. It has a RH thread, like the wheel nut. This is a good time to measure the rear disk thickness and replace the disk if necessary, also the rear pads. Good aftermarket disks don't cost very much and last longer than the original ones. If you don't know the history of the bike perhaps you should replace the brake fluid front and rear too.
Re the gearing, I've done 95000km so far on my 05 Daytona 955i, and I thought the gearing was perfect. I like that 5th and 6th are only 7% different, so 5th is an alternate top gear if you want just a bit more zip. The Daytona does not have as much mid range torque as the Speed Triple 955i, but makes up for that with smoothness and extra power higher up. However, now I have my '16 Speed Triple 1050, which has loads of torque from 3000rpm up, the Daytona does seem lacking there. It doesn't do much below 4200rpm. A popular change is to go from 42 to 45 at the rear. This puts 6th gear where 5th gear was. I just went to 44 at the rear, and it does feel stronger. I'd go to 45 if I did it again. The engine doesn't feel too busy, even in 5th gear. If you like torque I'd suggest this change. You'll need an extra 2 links in the chain, 104 up to 106 links. I didn't want to replace my chain, which has done only 79000km so far, so I bought two joining links and took the inner link from the section I removed from the chain to reduce it to 106 links when I installed it.
Now I just noticed that Sussurf mentioned the rear suspension!
Re the valve clearances, in my experience they tend to decrease, if anything, but they are very stable, so I shim them at the max 0.008" inlet, 0.012" exhaust, install iridium plugs and the later ignition coil seals, and don't go there again for 40,000km.
IanB
 
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