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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Morning all,

A few months back I managed to bag myself a deal on a non runner. I love a project and the price was so good I couldn't say no.

I managed to get it running with little effort and then decided to fix the seized front brakes. I've rebuilt both of the front calipers as they was in a terrible state (see images below). They now move freely but unfortunately the RH side caliper leaks fluid past one (maybe both, it's hard to see) piston. As you can see from the pictures, the front lip holding the top washer in has started flaking off and the pistons themselves aren't in great shape with some corrosion/marks. I thought I would try to see if this wouldn't be as much of an issue as it seems and was hoping that it would still seal and work fine, but apparently not.

I've tried removing the seals again and giving it a good clean but it's still leaking, so I'm guessing that I'm going to have to spend a bit of money here getting it sorted as the last thing I want to be doing is riding a bike with brakes I don't trust.

Does anyone have any advice on what steps to take next? Realistically it isn't really worth me spending a fortune on this bike so I'm hoping there are some low(ish) cost options!!

I believe the part number for the caliper I have is: 2020700-T0301

I'm struggling to find anyone that is selling a used RH front caliper, I wonder if just changing the pistons will suffice but looking at the calipers I feel like they may have had their day? It seems that Triumph want approx. £400 per caliper
:012:


Could I fit a different set of calipers, either from a newer model or a different bike entirely, to my bike? I see there are loads of a newer style caliper being sold online but I don't know if they will fit.

I'd appreciate any advice you can give me!

Thanks in advance!

IMG-7829.JPG IMG-0093.JPG IMG-7836.jpg IMG-7835.jpg IMG-7833.jpg
 

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Probably the minimum you can get away with would be a rebuild of the existing caliper. That would include honing the bores, cleaning the pistons, and replacing the piston seals. Short of that you won't fix the leak since it's leaking because of a flaw or nick in one of the seals or possibly physical damage to the bore(s). You can't fix that without replacing parts. If you're lucky you can probably find a seal kit based on the bore size of the caliper if you can't find a specific rebuild kit for the bike.

If the bores are very corroded then your chances of success even with a rebuild are not good.
 

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I've recently rebuilt the callipers on my '93 Trophy. The callipers weren't in quite as bad a condition as yours, but replacing the seals and pistons might do it, unless the bores have had it. I got the seal kit from Wemoto and while the pistons were ok for this bike, I've recently replaced the pistons on my Tiger for far less than Wemoto wanted for the whole kit.

From what I can see, the damage is all at or above where the dust seal sits, so if the bores are ok, new seals & pistons might do it.
 

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Sprint Manufacturing UK sells many Triumph parts and rebuild kits.
They do, that's usually my first port of call for the Trophy, but I'm tight, so always shop around to see if I can get the same items cheaper elsewhere.

Sometimes I can, but often I can't. I find Fowlers of Bristol aren't too bad for some parts and squaredeals-ltd can be useful too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for all the advice guys. I've already tried replacing the seals after deep cleaning the calipers & pistons. I just checked again with some wood between the pistons and I can see the new washers squeezing out past the damage on the lip of the dust seal. I guess I'm going to have to bite the bullet and buy some new calipers.

Does anyone have any experience/knowledge on if the 4 pot nissin style calipers will fit as a replacement to my 2 pot type? The bolt centers are 90mm on both - what else would determine if they would fit? They seem to be a lot easier to get and for a better price too!
 

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6-pot Tokico calipers from a Hayabusa were a common upgrade for 90's Trophys, I'm not sure what you've got but maybe worth looking at? They're on eBay, etc.

(that would be the Suzuki GSX 1300R, 1999 to 2007)
 

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Does anyone have any experience/knowledge on if the 4 pot nissin style calipers will fit as a replacement to my 2 pot type? The bolt centers are 90mm on both - what else would determine if they would fit? They seem to be a lot easier to get and for a better price too!
You might find this topic from the T300 Facebook group interesting if considering a front brake upgrade.
 

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6-pot Tokico calipers from a Hayabusa were a common upgrade for 90's Trophys, I'm not sure what you've got but maybe worth looking at? They're on eBay, etc.

(that would be the Suzuki GSX 1300R, 1999 to 2007)
6-pot Tokicos from a Hayabusa should be easy enough to source, but that's mainly because they were awful and a lot of owners took them off and fitted 4-pot versions instead. I had a gen 1 Busa; if I'd not traded it for a Tiger 1050 changing the brakes would have been next on my to-do list.

If the 6-pot ones are known to fit the Trophy, it'd be worth searching to see what the Busa owners fitted once they'd taken off the 6-pots and fit those instead.
 

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6-pot Tokicos from a Hayabusa should be easy enough to source, but that's mainly because they were awful and a lot of owners took them off and fitted 4-pot versions instead. I had a gen 1 Busa; if I'd not traded it for a Tiger 1050 changing the brakes would have been next on my to-do list.

If the 6-pot ones are known to fit the Trophy, it'd be worth searching to see what the Busa owners fitted once they'd taken off the 6-pots and fit those instead.
Nothing wrong with 4 pot brakes even if you can't find the bigger master cylinder right away. You will need the floating discs though .I would think there are a lot more 4 pots available than 6 pots so probably cheaper. I did the whole thing for 200 dollars.
 

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6-pot Tokicos from a Hayabusa should be easy enough to source, but that's mainly because they were awful and a lot of owners took them off and fitted 4-pot versions instead. I had a gen 1 Busa; if I'd not traded it for a Tiger 1050 changing the brakes would have been next on my to-do list.

If the 6-pot ones are known to fit the Trophy, it'd be worth searching to see what the Busa owners fitted once they'd taken off the 6-pots and fit those instead.
hadn't heard that-what was so awful about them? My Trophy had them on when I got it, and I'm just going by what I read at the time, which was that the stock front brakes were less than great, and that the 6-pots were a common and vastly better upgrade. I've certainly had no complaints, but I'm interested to hear your side of the story.
 

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hadn't heard that-what was so awful about them? My Trophy had them on when I got it, and I'm just going by what I read at the time, which was that the stock front brakes were less than great, and that the 6-pots were a common and vastly better upgrade. I've certainly had no complaints, but I'm interested to hear your side of the story.
It's quite possible (likely?) that whilst the 6-pots weren't up to the job on the Busa, they are fine on the Trophy. I found the brakes lacking on mine and knew at the time that changing out the calipers for 4 pots is a common change. I've one friend that's done that on a Gen 1 Busa and reports that the brakes are markedly better; as he is a racer that's competitive at the Isle of Man TT he's much better placed to judge than me.

Googling for Hayabusa 6-pot replacement will bring up pages of folk disenchanted with their original brakes fitting cheaply-sourced alternatives that they seem happy with.

Some of it will be internet forum bluff and bluster, but it does seem there is quite a number of people disappointed with their 6-pots.
 

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well..very interesting. I suppose it could be that the stock Trophy front brakes were really bad, then...LOL.

In any event, I'm happy with the Tokico 6-pots on my bike, but I never rode it with anything else as they were on it when I purchased it. When it warms up here in the spring it'll be getting new discs and pads..
 

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From what I have read, so no personal experience, the 6 pot busa calipers would flex too much when getting warm. Someone who does not ride them "hard" they should do the job. That being said, the blue dot yammie brakes are supposed to be a bolt on option giving a nice improvement in braking behaviour. I do thin these only fit the floating disk though.

V

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