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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I am trying to get the center stand working properly. The stand was bent when I got the bike, probably from starting the engine while on it. I managed to straighten the twisted connecting tube with lots of propane heat.

The stand is otherwise ok, but I had to make a new footlever since the original Siamese exhaust was changed to twin pipes at some time.

The ears on the frame has seen some wear (a little more than a mm), which make the stand lean too much back. This in turn makes the stand slide on smooth surfaces when the bike is pushed off it. A photo is attached, showing how the bike currently sits (bike is complete now).

Since the ears have little damage, I would like to build up the contact area on the stand rather than do anything to the frame ears.

My question: Is it possible to get information somewhere on how the bike should normally sit on the centre stand? I am thinking of how many degrees the feet should lean back from vertical when everything is to spec.

Thanks, Helge.
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You may consider some of what I will say a nonanswer. Do I know how many degrees the lean back is No I do not. If you stand is worn excessively you can use one off a 78 T140V or a 79 T140E The difference is the length of the foot lever. Earlier and later carry different parts number I suspect the later will work but not sure about the ones fitted to drum brake models . An other way to stop the sliding is to place a foot in front of the stand as you are pushing the machine off the stand. I remember when these bikes were new, on the showroom floor, while on the centerstand they tended to sit on the rear tire with the front a bit in the air.
As far a building up the contact area I am sure that could be done. More of a trial and error to see what works. If it were mine i would probably leave as is.

K
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you, Kadutz.

While on the stand, and on level ground, the front wheel is approx. 1/2" above ground. This seems ok, but I think that the legs should be a bit more straight up to make it easier to push the bike off the stand. At 72 I don't have all the muscle I once had, so looking for easiest handling.

I am looking at putting a little blob of Castolin 1020 XFC brazing material on each of the stand legs at the contact points, and file to shape, to see how that works. Only a mm (or less) should lift the stand considerably. I don't know, but maybe it will be a matter of time before those blobs are out of shape due to the high stress, but nothing is harmed as long as I have not done any welding. I don't like the thought of welding on the frame ears, or stand legs, at this point. If the brazing lasts for a while, it is easily repeatable anyway.

Or, maybe I should leave it as is, as suggested.

Helge.
 

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You could try some 1mm shim material to see what effect it has and fine tune to get the angle that works for you, you’d need to glue it in position or use double sided sticky tape.

Just a thought, are the pivot bolts in good condition? If they’re worn that will allow the stand to go further than it should.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Thanks newsh,

The bolts are new, with diameter 12.56mm at the sliding surfaces.
The holes in the frame ears have diameter 12.8mm. They seem a little worn so maybe the original diameter was less.

A very non-scientific calculation tells me that a 1mm shim at the contact points between frame ears and centre stand would result in moving the feet of the stand between 1 and 2 cm's rearwards. Only trial and error will give the definitive answer to this, I think.

Maybe it would be sensible to use shims of a material a little softer than the steel in the frame ears and centre stand. This is why I thought of building up the shimming by using brazing material on the stand, which can be repaired at a later stage if it gets deformed. The original arrangement doesn't seem very robust to me :) at least if one wants to start the engine with the bike on the stand.
 

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if you eithe have a lathe or access to somone who does - maybe get a steel dowell made to press into the frame lugs
i have done this in the past on a built bike -- the holes in frame will no doubt be out out round - so some filing or work with a dremel should get it done --- takes time but is do-able
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you wol,

I am lucky to have a Myford ML7 lathe in my house. 1964 model, so a real classic. The time consuming part of this job is to prepare the lug/ear holes to fit the dowels properly.
I will do some test fitting with the existing 0.24mm clearance between bolts and holes, and see how that affects the centre stand position with 1mm shims between stand and frame lugs, and take it from there.

Thanks for all good suggestions,
Helge.
 

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Anyone using a main stand could not fail to grind their teeth at every use. How many ft Ib's ! bearing down on that little lug. In the past I'd also thought of using a soft metal as a buffer, but perhaps that's not the way. Answers on a postcard.:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I love my bike. It gives me so much quality time in the garage, or even in my favourite chair... just wondering about all those small issues that can be fixed, or even improved, without any money spent on petrol 😁
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
No I hadn't, what a beautiful lathe! Mine is a 1964 model ML7, I bought it 20 years ago. Not restored, but in quite good shape.

On another note, I tried a couple of different shim thicknesses to make the centre stand more upright. Some backwards lean is of course necessary to prevent the bike from being pushed off by accident. Earlier on I had dressed the frame lugs with a dremel to make them equally shaped. Now shims with thickness 1.5mm brazed to the contact surfaces of the stand legs should do the job. I think I may use stainless steel for this purpose.
 

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