Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
1978 T140E
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is something I have just kind of dealt with the past 5-6 years of having this bike but as I am getting older its starting to bother my hand on longer rides.

It seems like the clutch level reach is extremely long. Below are two photos showing my lever. Looking at the parts catalog, the blade is 60-7023 and the handle bar attachment part is 60-7022.

It is difficult to tell comparing photos online of the replacement parts against mine but mine does seem to have a much more exaturated bend as it gets more towards the end of
the handle. The chrome is not chipped or flaking so i do not think that the handle i have was bent.

Does anyone have some insight on this?
Hand Bicycle handlebar Automotive tire Bicycle tire Bicycle frame
Hand Wood Gesture Finger Line
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,408 Posts
Hi,

Checked both my T150 and T100 different levers, 'fraid to say the measurement in your photos. is correct ... :(

parts catalog, the blade is 60-7023 and the handle bar attachment part is 60-7022.
Actually, the lever on your bike probably isn't ... :sneaky: '75-on, NVT and Meriden muddied the parts waters pretty good:-

. Chromed steel clutch lever on a perch clamped to the handlebar was last widely-fitted fitted in '70, part # 60-2242.

. '71, both Triumph and BSA swapped to an ally lever bolted to a perch casting that combined with the then-new switches cluster; they did use 60-2242 on the '73 X75 and '73/'74 TR5T.

. '75, T160, NVT used a chromed steel clutch lever on a perch clamped to the handlebar ... used the same 60-2242 part # but it wasn't the same lever (by this time, NVT was well into its petulant "We don't supply spares for obsolete models" period :rolleyes:). The differences between the two "60-2242" are:-

.. '75, the distance between the lever pivot centre and the clutch cable nipple centre is 1";

.. pre-'75 the centres distance is only 7/8".

. '75 twins, Meriden still used the previous ally or chromed steel lever lever bolted to a perch casting that combined with the switches cluster.

. '76-'78, Meriden fitted exactly the same handlebar switch clusters and levers as the T160, I've an idea that's the reason they part # the clutch lever assembly 60-7021 and the bits 60-7022 and 60-7023, to try and differentiate 'em from the pre-T160 60-2242 lever. However, regrettably, Meriden didn't put the Amal part # in parts books, :( that would've confirmed it one way or the other.

as I am getting older its starting to bother my hand on longer rides.
First imho, you should measure the distance between the lever pivot centre and the clutch cable nipple centre carefully:-

. 1" lever's likely original, rocking-horse poo to replace as the pattern parts makers haven't ever replicated it;

. 7/8" lever's likely a replacement; the pattern parts makers have replicated this one for decades, if you Google "triumph 60-7021", you'll be linked to dealers selling this one;

. bigger than 1" (1-1/6" or 1-1/8"), the lever's a pattern one intended for triples, the additional centres distance might be contributing to your aches.

If the lever is 7/8" between centres, 'fraid the other thing that might be beginning to bother your hand is the 750 twin has relatively-heavy clutch springs, several past posts/threads about the phenomenon. :( If the clutch spring adjuster nuts are correctly positioned (either bottom of slot or top of head about level with end of stud), regrettably either loosening the nuts or fitting lighter springs just lets the clutch slip more easily; the only fix seems to be one of the aftermarket 7-plate kits combined with lighter springs. :(

Hth.

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,188 Posts
When you pull the lever, how long before the clutch releases? Half stroke? I look at it and can't imagine that you would need all that lever stroke/arc. You would bind the pressure plate and springs well before that surely?
I think you need to establish what is needed for the clutch to work properly, then look for solutions. There are many options you could use...even just with other standard Triumph pivot and lever setups.
 

·
Registered
1978 T140E
Joined
·
114 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sorry for the pause on replies, my bike is kept in a storage unit and its been a while since I have gone out.

I ordered a replacement from Bonneville shop and the part is listed as 60-2242, 60-7021 and 60-7015. Unfortuently the reach is just as bad as the unit on my bike. Here are two photos. The one installed on the bars in the new one in these photos. In the photo with the two levers stacked on top of each other. The one on the bottom is my origional lever and the one on the top is the new unit.

@newsh - the lever in your second post above looks pretty great for my need. Do you happen to know where you got that or the part number?

@StuartMac - thank you for the detailed response. It is strange that parts suppliers are listing replacements with both the 60-7021 and 60-2242 and calling them the same part. My clutch is set up properlty, its just the overall reach, i am grabbing it with the last knuckles segment of my fingers and I would rather the lever hit mid finger at my actual knuckles.

Bicycles--Equipment and supplies Automotive tire Bicycle tire Bicycle frame Bicycle

Hand Glove Automotive tire Finger Wrist
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
608 Posts
Like Lake Marine, swap positions on the handlebar with switchgear and lever.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,408 Posts
Hi,
strange that parts suppliers are listing replacements with both the 60-7021 and 60-2242 and calling them the same part.
We wish ... 'fraid not strange at all, the parts wholesalers have been reducing the inventory for decades, often with mistakes; :mad: I sometimes think they'll only be happy when they make one universal part that does everything, fits everything ...

Like Lake Marine, swap positions on the handlebar with switchgear and lever.
Not really, then you're pulling the lever closer to the pivot and you need a six-inch thumb to operate the switches without taking your hand off the grip. (n)

The fix is different levers and possibly switches - e.g. Upgraded Switchgear

Hth.

Regards,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
@newsh - the lever in your second post above looks pretty great for my need. Do you happen to know where you got that or the part number?
This is the lever from my post. Centre of ball to bar is about 3 3/4”.
I’ll see if I can find details.



Edit: it’s this one but there are no details in the listing..


As I no longer need it you would be welcome to it but I fear shipping to the US would be expensive.

What I would try in your situation, as you obviously have more lever travel than you need, would be to adjust some slack into the cable and add something to space the lever from the perch (maybe try it with a zip tie round the cable) and see how you get on with the lever closer to the bars.
I ended up using a lever from a modern Yamaha which is longer and dog legged. You can see it in this photo.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,188 Posts
The alternative I was thinking of is to swap the switchgear out for a T150/160 or later T140 where the clutch pivot and lever bracket are a part of the back of the switchgear. I have a T150 and a late model T`140 and the lever location and reach etc are fine,,,certainly much better located than your setup. But the solution depends on your personal choices. Whether to stay british/Triumph and pay the extra dollars or do what newsh has done which looks practical and very neat.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
11,408 Posts
Hi,
@newsh - the lever in your second post above looks pretty great for my need. Do you happen to know where you got that or the part number?
This is the lever from my post. Centre of ball to bar is about 3 3/4”.
Afaik, it's a pattern of a pe-'70 Doherty lever, so likely to be available on US Ebay too?

I have one on my T150 (for the greater distance between lever pivot and cable nipple desirable on a triple). However, being a pattern, the distance between lever end and handlebar on different lever assemblies is ... uh ... variable ... e.g. my T150's is similar to the standard lever ... :cool:

Being pre-'70, it also lacks the mirror mounting hole in the perch, possibly more of a problem in the US?

as you obviously have more lever travel than you need
Standard Triumph lever, how do you extrapolate "obviously have more lever travel than you need" with certainty? :confused:

The alternative I was thinking of is to swap the switchgear out for a T150/160 or later T140 where the clutch pivot and lever bracket are a part of the back of the switchgear.
Your bike has exactly the same switches and levers as a T160, so I think he means the earlier ('73/'74) T140 and T150 switches - the right-hand one will attach to your bike's front brake master cylinder mounting.

'79-on, Meriden fitted switch clusters and levers based on those fitted to the electric-start Commando, and dog-leg levers '82-on. They are (y) and solve all the problems with the crap on pre-'79 Triumphs; however, the dog-leg levers are rocking-horse poo and, since Sparx stopped sourcing the switch clusters, they're all ridiculously-expensive. :(

Another consideration with the '79-on levers and switch clusters is the distance between clutch lever pivot and cable nipple centres is increased to 1"; Meriden must've been concerned the extra cable inner pulled by the handlebar lever could over-rotate the clutch disengagement mechanism in the gearbox outer cover, they fitted a correspondingly-shorter gearbox "Clutch lever", marked with an "X".

Hth.

Regards,
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top