Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

121 - 140 of 148 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,664 Posts
Hi vstevens, The speedo drive left hand thread is in the right end of hub. A steel sleeve with 2 notches cut in it 37-7004 "Driving ring speedometer unit". It screws into right side of rear hub. Appears to retain right bearing, but it doesn't actually even touch it. I just runs the speedo drive.

Regarding the screws, yes you need pozidrive screw drivers. #s 1,2,3 sizes.
Your bike has all 3 sizes. Very hard to find locally. Ebay or tool sellers like Snap-on & Mac have high quality ones.
On the pricey side, but this Snap-on driver is the cat's meow. Good used one from eBay not bad plan. Still you need some bits & small 1/4" handle for your tool kit.


This driver DOES NOT COME WITH POZIDRIVE BITS.

Some change to Allen head bolts. Simply a matter of preference. You still need to pozidrive for all the other screws though. Pozidrive, before it gets mangled from a Philips driver actually has more head grip to screwhead than Allen wrench.

Speaking of the speedo drive. They tend to wear easily. Keep it well greased. The fitting is an odd ball size. However if you use normal grease gun & hold tip real tight it will force grease in anyway. Over greasing not a problem. It will ooze out the felt seal at hub for a few hundred miles. Wipe it off. When equilibrium of grease happens, it stops leaking on it's own. I have been using StayLube MollyGraph grease for several thousand miles now to very good results. Works very good for swing arm as well. If possible keep the original well greased as the reproduction ones tend to be very low quality & don't last well at all. When you get the cable attached loosen axle nut & align the drive for best cable routing along swing arm.

You'll get to use your new British Standard/Whitworth wrenches on the cable.
Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #122
Thanks Don,

Gonna need a new toolbox. I was waiting for some guidance on the speedo drive install. The new one has a light green felt spacer/washer/something of another... I suppose it's purpose is to hold grease? I don't have a greasegun. I suppose that's an internet item. I don't ever recall needing one before, but perhaps home depot or harbor freight carries them.

Took a longer ride yesterday, about an hour and a half. Some freeway and some stop lights, too. I replaced the mirror with a bar-end mirror (left side). I'm really impressed with how well it works, with wide, clear, stable vision behind me. I had almost bought some aftermarket clamp on 8" mirrors (closer to stock), but the parts guy remarked about vibration and long mirrors, so I opted for the bar-end. Glad I did, though I hated cutting away the end of the left grip.

The ride was glorious, the weather wasn't too hot and I've gotten the hang of finding neutral when rolling to a stop. On the highway, there was plenty power and no issues keeping up. It seems about 55 - 65 is the sweet spot... any faster and the wind is unpleasant, anyway. Of course, I'm still without speedometer cable but I'm pretty sure of the range of speeds. (I just don't go faster than surrounding traffic - and I recall, from my prior moto guzzi v7 with a similar seating position, about when the wind becomes uncomfortable).

About a block or two from home, I got too confident and failed to 'blip' the throttle enough at a stoplight on a slight upwards incline. I was in a left turn lane, but pretty far over toward the center divide so cars could get past me as I tried kickstarting it. It wouldn't start for a full 2 minutes. When the light was green again, I pushed the bike into a U-turn and coasted back down the incline, put the bike in 2nd gear and let out the clutch.. it started and I rode home. Just like the experiences you shared, once heat-soaked (the tank felt warm and I'm certain the gas was, as well), it wants to die at stoplights unless given enough throttle. I wonder if there is a way to insulate the bottom of the tank from the engine heat?

For now, I've relegated the bonneville to shorter trips and pleasure riding around town. At least until I become more confident in the bike... and my own abilities. I'm still amazed how well this 45 year old motorcycle runs, inspite of dying on me a couple times. In a couple of years, I hope to have it restored as much as I'm able. The experience of learning how this old motorcycle works is worth the money spent... though I have to admit there are moments I question my judgment.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,648 Posts
Vince

Sorry I couldn't get back to you yesterday. Due to family obligations the Mrs ( and known worldwide as THE BARBARA) felt my attention should be directed elsewhere;). I see our friend Don has been busy typing with excellent answers as usual.
Absolutely love the Snap-On bit he showed. I have number of Snap -On Tools (including a Top Box) All excellent quality but as Don said a wee bit NOT inexpensive.By the way the Snap-On site lists the SDMR4BR @ $71.00 vs $64.99 (delivered) for the Ebay one. Then I also found a SDMR4B (a Black one on auction) currently bid @ $45.00 (+8.00 shipping) and a SDMR4CG (Combat Green with a black shaft) for $89.99 (+$9.99 economy shippingo_O) . Pozidrive tools are not really that hard to find. Good Lord I do LUV the quality but one Snap-On (or MATCO) item with a couple of bits will eat up my entire Pension Check:oops:!

I'm sure Don will cringe at the next bit 😁 Harbor Freight has a few Pozidrive offerings. Seven in One screwdriver (on clearance) #94955 for $1.97 has a #1 & #2 Pozi bits along with 5 other bits. Then you have the 32 piece Screwdriver set ($7.99) # 61259 or #90764 that contain #1,2,3 Pozi bits. Then if you want to go Hi-Dollar ($11.99) there is 33 piece Comfort Grip Set that has Pozi #0,1,2,3 bits. On the other hand you have Home Depot. They have a 3/8" drive #2 Pozi bit (#H3DPZBS2) $2.47 OR a 23 piece ratcheting screwdriver set (H23PCCSDESET) ($10.97) that has #0 & 1 Pozi bits. Then they have some Felo products #0715 761 545 ($63.76) a Ratchet Set that looks to have four Pozi bits.Then they have two Pozidrive screwdrivers listed at under $12 65 ea. The #2 is 0715 722 102 and the #3 is 07115 731 330 both these looks like you need to order to be shipped to the local store. Now the if you want to use Snap -On Pozidrive bits they look to also be available at under $8.00 each. I note the PO switched your Primary Cover (and I assume Timing Cover & Gearbox Cover) screws to socket head so you may have limited need for the larger Pozi bits. Not suggesting anything here just showing some options.

Keep Calm and Carry ON

K 😷
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,648 Posts
One suggestion I forgot that's if you purchase some individual bits they are very easy to misplace or lose in the tool box.

I put little stuff like that in old pill bottles (lord knows we have a bunch around here). Mark what's in it on the side and the orange bottle stands out. Best way I have found to keep track of the little buggers.

K 😷
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,664 Posts
Hi Vstevens, This is my grease gun. I got a 2nd hose to make it longer. Just makes it easier to reach swing are fittings on my bike. The important thing is you want one hand operation to pump gun so other hand is free. Of course UK type grease nipples on swing arm have slightly different shape than USA nipples. Out grease gun end will work, but sometimes it may get stuck so you unscrew the jaw adjuster at tip a little & it pulls off. Will depend on the tip you have. All the ones sold in USA will work on swing arm nipples though.

Mine was sold as mini gun, but now there are "smaller minis". I'd start with the grease cartriages, you want, then get gun to match. Extra hoses sell for $7 free shipping on ebay. Anyway these little guns work good. Don't worry about PSI as all are very high, more than enough for our use. In any case you'll need a grease gun.
Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,664 Posts
Hi vstevens, Thinking about your bike dying in left turn lane, I very well know what you went through!! Very dangerous.

I have a few thoughts. Nobody I know has insulated bottom of tank. I don't know it that would even really matter overall. I know warm fuel is not bad, but there is more going on with your bike. My 5 riding friends & I actually put lots of miles on our old bikes in many riding conditions. We have both air gap & solid insulators on our carbs. They act the same so that's not a factor unless yours is some odd substance. I doubt it though.

Since bike runs well overall, we know tune up is good, so that is not a factor.

What becomes a factor is idle rpm, mixture adjustment. The mixture must be set by trial & error with motor heat soaked. Idle speed is also trial & error motor heat soaked. I think you've figured out what seems best.

Air filters is another factor. I don't like paper air filters. They can mess with mixture. Original wire/gauze (wire screen & fabric gauze) I find work best.

Mufflers are also a factor. I have close riding friends with retro mufflers similar to yours that work quite well with minimal effect on mixture. Even though they are straight through the perforated tube gives a fair amount of back pressure. No matter as bike runs good overall.

The other factor is slide/bore wear in carb. Looking at your carb in photos it looks like could original.

I can say from personal experience on my bike & others worn carbs increase the dying at stop lights about 90-95+%.

This cannot be overstated. Amal carbs fitted to these bikes new had a very short service life. Showing wear at even 10k miles or less.

By 15k miles my carb was very worn & very prone to dying. Dangerous to ride really. I got new slide for nearly free. I installed it. Improve things to make bike at least ridable. Not good or safe, but ridable, by constant blipping of throttle at stop. Truth be told I didn't believe wear was root problem. Carbs are $200 each as we know. I was short cash.

Finally new slide & carb bore wore even worse, making bike die regularly at stop lights without blipping.

Now premier carb body castings were on back order for months from Amal....

I had several club rides & an 850 mile moto melee to ride. I learned if I biased mixture lean at idle, & raised idle rpm to 1200+ it was at least safe enough to ride. Needless to say high idle is not at comfortable to ride with. Especially getting neutral & into 1st. At the same time motor would die 100% of time on take off without over revving at take off. Not so good for clutch...

Finally I was able to get new carb built to my specs directly from Amal. That cured at least 95+ percent of dying hot. 100% cured dying on take off. I couldn't how good bike ran with new carb.

I specifically road tested very carefully how bike ran before installing carb. I specifically changed nothing else in tune up etc. My goal was to see if just installing new carb would help. I had already cleaned air filters etc. prior to the before new carb road testing so they would not be factor. Again I wanted to just install carb. I used new thick oring. Set air gap to .045". So no other factors came into play. So the carb itself was root problem of so many poor running issues that I had just gotten used to besides the dying.

An fellow group member suggested a test for slide wear. It turned out to be reliable test.
Heat soak bike 25-30 miles. Pull over & let idle like at red light. Very slowly turn throttle. Slowly as you can. The slides will lift only .003-.005" if that. With worn slides/bore motor will falter or die. It will often start right away. Do this test many times over several tries, on same road test, then others. Memorize what it does. Then try leaning mixture such you get best mixture at idle first. Best, fastest idle. Then go lean (outwards) with screw until motor rpm lowers. Stop there. Raise slides to get a higher rpm. During this adjustment set the idle to about 1000 if you had it set higher prior. Ride bike some more & see if this has any effect at all on the throttle opening slowly test. I found it make bike more ridable while waiting for back ordered carbs to come in.

On my old worn carb it was very easy to get it to die or almost die. Yet a quicker opening would pass the dead spot. I over time learned to compensate by never opening slowly. When carb got really bad I could feel motor stutter with slow opening even while riding at lower speeds, but momentum of bike kept motor turning so it would refire instantly. But with practice I could feel it & reproduce it at will.

New carb, no matter how slowly I opened throttle the rpm never ever went lower or tried to die. I did exact same road tests over some weeks to be sure I could replicate bad carb & good carb actions/operation. I hate guess work. I wanted to know the effects.

You're looking at $400 for new carbs. Last thing we want is getting new carbs & not fixing problems!!!!

So print this. Go for several road test & report back as to what you find with current carbs. That very slow opening is the key test in my experience. This test has proven very reliable so far on 5 bikes that I was involved with.

Do not buy non premier carbs even though cheaper. They don't last well or run as well. I have personal experience with that.

Should you buy new carbs, most sellers have generic ready to tune. You want specific specs on your new carbs so you need to verify exactly what your new carbs will be built with. Parts are costly so you want them built right the first time so you'll have no additional costs.
Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #128
Thanks Don,
I saved this message (a a few others) to my laptop and printed it out. This weekend, I'll take another ride 25 miles or so and do as you suggest. Yes, the carburetors appear to be original. PO stated he rebuilt them, and to his credit they seem to be working in spite of the age of the carbs. How do I determine the specs I want?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,437 Posts
Peg — I gotta ask even though it reveals my ignorance.., how do I know the bike is rotated just past compression? Suddenly I feel the need to shout, “I’m not worthy’, lol
Hi,
Sorry, I forgot you were used to an electric start.
The idea is that you have the pistons at the top of the bore at the start of your kickstart stroke, but you don’t want the engine to fire instantly. You get the piston past the point where it will fire, then when you engage the kickstarter, all of the energy from the first revolution of the engine is stored up in the flywheel. When the pistons rise again, one of them will be on the firing stroke. There will be enough energy in the flywheel to overcome the compression without slowing the crankshaft too much. When you reach the firing point ‘bang’ and the stored energy keeps the engine spinning as the piston powers down.
If you don’t have enough energy in the flywheel there is a chance that a cylinder will fire and spin the engine backwards, your foot still being on the kickstart take that force straight through your boot. ‘Ouch’.

To get the engine just past compression.
With the ignition Off, slowly and gently push the kickstart down, you will feel the resistance as one of the pistons rises up on it’s compression stroke. You will feel the engine resistance rise, then just start to decrease as the piston goes past Top dead centre. Stop pressing the kickstart here. It is all done with feel.
You are now ready to start, let the kickstart ratchet up to the top (a lot of people prefer to let the kickstart ratchet up nearer horizontal rather than to the top).
Ignition on, then kick it like you mean it, push hard all the way through, not just hard at the start.
————————————————————————————————————————————————————

Having been to London, I can say with confidence the traffic is grueling. No way would I attempt to drive in London ... maybe out in the country... but just getting used to driving on the left is hard enough. Factor into that bad traffic and no go.

San Francisco/Bay Area is likely worse, much worse than San Diego (LA tops the list for traffic - although Seattle is in competition).

personally, I don’t have the confidence to switch off my bike at a stop- light. If it were electric start.., maybe. I just don’t trust the drivers behind me. And I won’t be driving the next time I’m visiting London. (Which is, consequently, my favorite city),
London is my favourite city also, but I’m biased I live near the centre.

London had two chances to sort itself out for traffic and failed both times. The original streetplan originated around the first bridge that crossed the river Thames, by the Roman invaders in AD43. This was a spiders web of narrow streets.
In 1666 a great fire destroyed the city, plans were made to rebuild with wide boulevards and a grid system, but the merchants wanted to get back and trading as quickly as possible, so it was rebuilt on the original Roman streetplan.
During the 2nd world war many of the buildings were damaged, a visionary architect and town planner called Patrick Abercrombie put forward a plan called the "London Ringways’ 5 concentric rings of highway with intersecting highways passing through them like spokes on a wagon wheel. The plan was started, but was waterred down and cut back by successive governments. There are some remnants, London Wall, Westway, some of the North circular, M1, A40. By the 1970’s the plan had fallen apart, the bits of the outer ring were joined up to make the M25 orbital motorway, and that’s the way it has been left.
So we still have a 2000 year old streetplan.

Passing on the left was pretty much universal through the world in the pre car days The tale is that if you pass on the left, you had your sword hand on the side that allowed you to defend yourself against someone coming in the opposite direction. Driving on the right was pushed forward in France by Napoleon Bonaparte in the early 19th century.
You have to concentrate, one lapse and you are in big trouble.
The British have Always known that the correct side to drive Is on the Left and everyone else made a mistake😉
Remember;
Left is Right and Right is wrong😊

I have just got a job in Brussels, Belgium for the next couple of years so I’m planning a weekly commute.So I will be riding on the Right during the week and on the Left at the weekend😱

The London traffic is deadly, it improved when motorcycles were allowed to use the bus lanes, then got worse again when badly planned cycle lanes (Lethal for the poor old cyclists) cut across the roads.

Iv’e ridden the Bay area, PCH, Texas and Arizona, the USA is just built for motor transport. The only serious country for vehicles in Europe is Germany.

regards
Peg
 
  • Like
Reactions: vstevens

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #130
Thank you Rancidpegwoman. Beautiful explanation of kickstarting. Understanding what is going on with pistons (which I had considered), and flywheel (which I hadn’t considered), helps terrifically.
Believe it or not, while in London I was shocked to see a motor scooter driver furiously speeding away from police, in hot pursuit. The scooterist boldly weaved between insanely packed traffic, repeatedly twisting his head back to see if the police were close behind.. they were. It all happened in a couple moments, there and gone but for the wailing sirens. Gawd I love London
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,437 Posts
Hi Peg, Shut off motor at red light? We see eye to eye on most things, but stopping motor at red lights is a death wish. What if bike doesn't start promptly? You'd get ran over. That's simply not practical. I've never seen anybody stop motor on purpose at red light. I've done many club rides & ridden with hundreds of others. We just never ever do that. I have a close riding circle of about 5 guys. None every stops motor at stop light on purpose.

I know cams don't oil as well at idle. Still, I've covered 35k+ miles on my motor so far, original pistons, rings, bores, valves, guides. I live east of San Francisco. Traffic is dreadful. Stop & go on freeway for miles, hours. Stop lights are very long. I idle motor about 1050. I'd hate to count the minutes my bike has idled. It cold weather it will idle flawlessly no matter how long. Above 90f when heat soaked & gas in tank is hot from sun & heat from surrounding cars, I must blip throttle occasionally. As you say, not high rpm. I do everything possible to keep motor from dying at stop lights.

I would imagine traffic in UK in the big cities is similar to here. Seriously, you'd be rear ended for sure. You know how cars move up until they are packed up at lights. If you don't move up, you will get rear ended. Lane splitting (threading) is legal in California, but not in most states of USA. Lots of riders hit lane splitting in my area. Pretty much all the riders I know that lane split have been hit. A few seriously injured. Crazy as it sounds, these bikes can actually take the heat of city riding quite well. The biggest problem I have is low voltage after an hour of city riding. 3 phase alternator is cure for that. I already have LED headlight.
Don
Hi Don

This is conjecture, you havn’t tried it.
how do I know?
Because I have never met anyone else daft enough to shut their engine off at the lights😊.

Give it a go though, not all the time, but only on the really long waits, position yourself carefully in the road so you are safe.
You will be surprised how much time you have to set up the restart when you plan the shutdown, it’s nothing like the panic when the engine unexpectedly stalls.
You will also be surprised at how well you can anticipate the green light.

You already know my fears;
Oil pressure drops low (<20psi) at tickover speed and there is just enough oil flow to keep the big ends safe.
The cylinders are lubricated by oil thrown off the big ends, this is greatly reduced, especially the left bore.
The camshaft lobes are not in line with the big ends, these are mostly lubricated by oil picked up by the crankshaft, the inlet Cam is first in line and gets most of the oil, the exhaust cam only gets the oil that’s left over. But the source has dried up. The cam wheels and timing main are lubricated by oil spill from after the Pressure Relief Valve, this never opens at tickover.
The engine has no air cooling, the engine has no oil cooling, the engine has very little lubrication. Very soon the oil is scraped off the cylinder walls, the extra friction producing even more heat. The cam nose pressure is much higher at low engine speed, this can drag and break through the reduced oil film.

Eventually the engine cannot overcome the extra friction and heat, so slows and stalls.

unplanned engine stops are far harder to deal With and are more dangerous than planned ones.

If you can build up engine speed to >3000rpm while waiting, then let it fall back to idle, this will give a much welcomed splash of oil around the engine. Not a ‘look at me’ blip but a slow build up and slowdown.

regards
Peg.

PS. If I don’t see eye to eye with you, then I am learning something from you in 99% of cases.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,664 Posts
Hi Peg, You are correct, I never shut off bike on purpose at light. I have too much experience with hard starting with heat soaked motor on warm day. I'm too old to heal if I get hit. Can't chance it.

I don't know if the idling at lights really wears motor that much. I had '70 TR6C. I got used 1500 miles from new on trade in. Owner wanted a Sportster. I commuted in the city 7 miles to work, then moved to suburbs. Took freeway, then through city. Plus pleasure riding covered 30k miles. It was getting pretty worn, but still ran good. Original carb! It never ever died at stop lights. I never blipped throttle.

My '73 Tiger I bought new, never ever died at red lights. It could idle as long as you wanted to. Never pinged. Started 1st kick cold or hot. Put just under 10k miles on it. Still had 100 octane leaded gas!! Put in storage Dec. '79. Stored 34 years. John got his '69 Bonnie. I couldn't believe all the problems with running & ping. He's a great mechanic, but I was sure he was missing something. Soon I got my bike back on road. 1st real road test, I took up a hill, pinged violently. I double checked strobe timing, float level etc. All to spec. I got a quick education on how much modern fuel changed from the old days! Fact is we just have to learn to deal with it, modify specs as/if needed & ride in manner the bikes work good as possible. I finally have found a fairly good formula that works pretty good. I will install 7.4 pistons this winter. I have experience with these in a few T140s so far. It really has worked good. There are other things that can work also, but these pistons make simple for average owner. Most shockingly for the way I & John ride there is no obvious power loss. We are old & slow, but ride pretty far. It pulls the passes, even up to 8000' effortlessly. Cruises 65-70 mph effortlessly also. John is using LF Harris 7.1. I found in all cases bike starts better also. Why? Maybe faster cranking speed from lower compression?? This has puzzled me, but in a happy way.

Good to hear you visited our Golden State. Bay area riding is tough. It does look easier than London though. I've been through San Francisco several times. Scares the daylights out of me. So many crazy drivers & I really don't know my way around the city which makes it much worse. As you found the elevated freeways have no shoulders so any problems you are stuck in the lane of traffic. I've only ridden in California. Texas has the fastest roads in USA so far as I can tell. Wife & have traveled a lot in USA. The limit on even narrow rural roads is 70mph. Some freeways 80! That's working the heart out of Triumphs. The hill country is my favorite part of Texas. Great riding if I'd had my bike there. I love the east coast. Probably the best riding area in USA? Well, except in winter... I need a bike trailer. 3k miles to east coast is long way on my old bike.
Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,664 Posts
Hi rstevens, Sorry I forgot to link photo of grease gun. These are cheap & work great. Again get gun to match cartridge.
Don
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #135
R
Hi,
Sorry, I forgot you were used to an electric start.
The idea is that you have the pistons at the top of the bore at the start of your kickstart stroke, but you don’t want the engine to fire instantly. You get the piston past the point where it will fire, then when you engage the kickstarter, all of the energy from the first revolution of the engine is stored up in the flywheel. When the pistons rise again, one of them will be on the firing stroke. There will be enough energy in the flywheel to overcome the compression without slowing the crankshaft too much. When you reach the firing point ‘bang’ and the stored energy keeps the engine spinning as the piston powers down.
If you don’t have enough energy in the flywheel there is a chance that a cylinder will fire and spin the engine backwards, your foot still being on the kickstart take that force straight through your boot. ‘Ouch’.

To get the engine just past compression.
With the ignition Off, slowly and gently push the kickstart down, you will feel the resistance as one of the pistons rises up on it’s compression stroke. You will feel the engine resistance rise, then just start to decrease as the piston goes past Top dead centre. Stop pressing the kickstart here. It is all done with feel.
You are now ready to start, let the kickstart ratchet up to the top (a lot of people prefer to let the kickstart ratchet up nearer horizontal rather than to the top).
Ignition on, then kick it like you mean it, push hard all the way through, not just hard at the start.
————————————————————————————————————————————————————



London is my favourite city also, but I’m biased I live near the centre.

London had two chances to sort itself out for traffic and failed both times. The original streetplan originated around the first bridge that crossed the river Thames, by the Roman invaders in AD43. This was a spiders web of narrow streets.
In 1666 a great fire destroyed the city, plans were made to rebuild with wide boulevards and a grid system, but the merchants wanted to get back and trading as quickly as possible, so it was rebuilt on the original Roman streetplan.
During the 2nd world war many of the buildings were damaged, a visionary architect and town planner called Patrick Abercrombie put forward a plan called the "London Ringways’ 5 concentric rings of highway with intersecting highways passing through them like spokes on a wagon wheel. The plan was started, but was waterred down and cut back by successive governments. There are some remnants, London Wall, Westway, some of the North circular, M1, A40. By the 1970’s the plan had fallen apart, the bits of the outer ring were joined up to make the M25 orbital motorway, and that’s the way it has been left.
So we still have a 2000 year old streetplan.

Passing on the left was pretty much universal through the world in the pre car days The tale is that if you pass on the left, you had your sword hand on the side that allowed you to defend yourself against someone coming in the opposite direction. Driving on the right was pushed forward in France by Napoleon Bonaparte in the early 19th century.
You have to concentrate, one lapse and you are in big trouble.
The British have Always known that the correct side to drive Is on the Left and everyone else made a mistake😉
Remember;
Left is Right and Right is wrong😊

I have just got a job in Brussels, Belgium for the next couple of years so I’m planning a weekly commute.So I will be riding on the Right during the week and on the Left at the weekend😱

The London traffic is deadly, it improved when motorcycles were allowed to use the bus lanes, then got worse again when badly planned cycle lanes (Lethal for the poor old cyclists) cut across the roads.

Iv’e ridden the Bay area, PCH, Texas and Arizona, the USA is just built for motor transport. The only serious country for vehicles in Europe is Germany.

regards
Peg
RPW -
I printed out your kick-starting explanation and have been experimenting with it.

my observations: (ignition off, no gas, just feeling for compression).
clutch in, some resistance and then it ‘breaks free’ and lever will ratchet down. Lever spins back up top. Clutch out. as lever is depressed, resistance peaks ... twice... with a ‘saddle’ or trough in between the peaks. The peaks are relatively close together. Feeling the first peak ... and moving just past, I find the cylinder ‘falls’ into the trough before the second peak.

my understanding (please correct me as needed):
One of the two pistons is rising in its cylinder, compressing the air. This must be the first peak felt. The trough of reduced resistance must be when the first piston is descending/falling in its cylinder as the second cylinder rises toward the second peak of resistance felt in the starter lever. The second cylinder’s descent signals the start of a longer trough ... greater period of time... before the first cylinder can be felt compressing air in its cylinder.

graphically, this might appear as a line graph with a repeating pattern of twin peaks with short trough/saddles between and a longer trough following the second peak.

my question is, “Do I halt lever descent in the trough between the peaks or just after the second peak? My guess is that I have been kicking the lever just before the first compression stroke. Perhaps that is why it usually still takes me several tries.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,437 Posts
Hi
On these (360 degree) engines both pistons rise and fall together, while the left piston is on the compression stroke, the right piston is on the exhaust stroke and vice versa. So although the pistons go up and down together, they fire left then right. This will also mean that the valves on one of the pistons are always either opening or closing, the opening and closing of the valves account for the ‘small’ resistances (peaks) you feel. The inlet valve starts to open just before TDC and the exhaust valve is fully closed just after.
Consentratrate on the major resistance rather than the minor one, get it to a peak, then turn the engine a tiny amount further and you should be ready to go.
If you want a visual indicator to see the peak that relates to TDC, remove the points cover, when the points just open the piston will be almost at TDC, turning the engine a fraction further puts you just past TDC. If you can get used to how it feels when you can see the points open, you should be able to retain that once the points cover is replaced.
Best regards
Peg.
 
  • Like
Reactions: vstevens

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,664 Posts
Hi vstevens, Yes use it for swing arm as well as speedo drive.

Going back 40 years, we switched to moly graph grease for king pins & ball joints on cars at the dealership. About doubled the life of king pins & bushings, with either bronze bush, steel shaft, or steel bush, steel shaft. Extended life of the old version steel/steel ball joints as well. Later ball joints are sealed. The cars were kept in family many years, often given the children so was easy to track these things. Customers were very loyal.
Don
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #138
Hi
On these (360 degree) engines both pistons rise and fall together, while the left piston is on the compression stroke, the right piston is on the exhaust stroke and vice versa. So although the pistons go up and down together, they fire left then right. This will also mean that the valves on one of the pistons are always either opening or closing, the opening and closing of the valves account for the ‘small’ resistances (peaks) you feel. The inlet valve starts to open just before TDC and the exhaust valve is fully closed just after.
Consentratrate on the major resistance rather than the minor one, get it to a peak, then turn the engine a tiny amount further and you should be ready to go.
If you want a visual indicator to see the peak that relates to TDC, remove the points cover, when the points just open the piston will be almost at TDC, turning the engine a fraction further puts you just past TDC. If you can get used to how it feels when you can see the points open, you should be able to retain that once the points cover is replaced.
Best regards
Peg.
Gonna have to print this for my growing T140 file. Another great explanation, thank you. Garage is too hot tonight, but this weekend I’ll do exactly as you suggest, looking for points opening while gauging feel. It was 32C all afternoon...not the worst but uncomfortable for playing with kickstarters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #139
Hi
On these (360 degree) engines both pistons rise and fall together, while the left piston is on the compression stroke, the right piston is on the exhaust stroke and vice versa. So although the pistons go up and down together, they fire left then right. This will also mean that the valves on one of the pistons are always either opening or closing, the opening and closing of the valves account for the ‘small’ resistances (peaks) you feel. The inlet valve starts to open just before TDC and the exhaust valve is fully closed just after.
Consentratrate on the major resistance rather than the minor one, get it to a peak, then turn the engine a tiny amount further and you should be ready to go.
If you want a visual indicator to see the peak that relates to TDC, remove the points cover, when the points just open the piston will be almost at TDC, turning the engine a fraction further puts you just past TDC. If you can get used to how it feels when you can see the points open, you should be able to retain that once the points cover is replaced.
Best regards
Peg.
360’ ... it didn’t occur to me both pistons rising and falling in tandem. The difference being which stroke they each experience. Hmmm
738237

Allow me to think out loud: as one piston is on its compression stroke (both valves closed), the other must be on its exhaust stroke (exhaust valve open). So In 4 strokes, the engine -as a whole - experiences a compression/spark-inspired combustion event every other stroke.

From a timing perspective, shouldn’t the point for each cylinder close to make contact on its respective compression stroke as that cylinder reaches either TDC or just before? In your explanation, you indicate points are open at TDC... I’m missing something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
Discussion Starter #140
738244

738245

the new speedo drive. Still waiting for post office to find my missing speedometer cable. I may just buy another in the meantime...

the bottom picture reveals the green felt ring pressed into the drive housing. The metal tab, inside the ring and at the top, is one of two placed opposite of each other.

my old speedo drive (still on the bike!) lacks the gearing and threaded cable fitting entirely. Fortunately, the metal drive ring with the left hand threads (not pictured) is still mounted on the right side of the rear wheel hub, notched into the old speedo drive.

Hoping the postal service finds my cable soon. They did contact me after my initial complaint a week ago. Gonna have to go down there if I can get off work early enough.
 

Attachments

121 - 140 of 148 Posts
Top