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Discussion Starter #221
While waiting for those bracket screws for the timing sub-plates (the eccentric screws, TDC tool, and a couple other rubber replacement parts arrived last week), I decided to replace the rubber grommets in the headlamp, and the rubber pieces on the headlight 'ears'.

740437


Two black-sheathed wire bundles each have a small lamp attached. I have no idea what they go to, or used to go to. Tracing the two black-sheaths back, they splice into the main harness coming into the headlight assembly. Any ideas? They don't seem to be harming anything so I left them alone. (they are not the headlamp running light)

Yes, I know several of the wiring connectors are substandard.... I'll get to that in time. Eventually, I can see re-wiring the whole thing. In fact, I've already started documenting which wires go where. Really, the only powered lamps in the headlamp assembly are the head lights (main and auxiliary), the switch on top of the assembly, and the three warning lights. By the way, how do you remove the wires from the warning lights? The side clipped wire just pulls off/pushes on. But the center wire? I don't want to force it out for fear of damaging it. Are the center wires from the warning lights spliced in to the main harness somewhere?

740440



Both turn signal wirings run into the left handlebar switch assembly, though they may end up in the headlight assembly before routing to the main harness. The Right handlebar switches include the kill switch and two mystery push- switches. The rectangular black switches, one above and one below the kill switch, push in and spring back out... I have no idea what they are supposed to do.

740441
 

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The lights are speedo and tach backlights. They tend to fall out of the instruments. Probably stuck in the headlight because owner got annoyed.

The high beam, oil pressure and turn signal bulb holders pull straight out from the back of the black housings. You shouldn't need to mess with the center wire.

The two rectangular switches on the right handlebar switch housing don't do anything on my 77 T140V.

If you dont have it yet, find the wiring diagram and familiarize yourself with the wire colors and components. Then you can verify against the diagram as you go. Document what you find that differs from the diagram.
 

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Check out this post for links to the wiring diagram and complete service manual.

 

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You can buy a new red paddle for the kill switch. Be aware that there are balls and springs in the assembly that like to jump out.
There is a brake light switch in the housing. If it's not working, try stuffing some foam between it and the housing to put pressure on the contacts. The switch is activated when the end of a screw in the brake handle is pulled away from the switch allowing the contacts to come together. The pressure on the contacts gets weak and the foam will help get them together. This is been an easy fix for me. An alternative is to add a hydraulic pressure switch to the brake master cylinder.
 

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Discussion Starter #227
Those two lights look like the speedo and tach lights, to illuminate once the headlight is switched on.

Roger
Aha - wondered where those went. Both the tach and speedo are not mounted. I’m focused on tuning currently... but eventually want to get the instruments repaired or replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter #228
The lights are speedo and tach backlights. They tend to fall out of the instruments. Probably stuck in the headlight because owner got annoyed.

The high beam, oil pressure and turn signal bulb holders pull straight out from the back of the black housings. You shouldn't need to mess with the center wire.

The two rectangular switches on the right handlebar switch housing don't do anything on my 77 T140V.

If you dont have it yet, find the wiring diagram and familiarize yourself with the wire colors and components. Then you can verify against the diagram as you go. Document what you find that differs from the diagram.
Thanks MLW - I’ll checkout the wiring diagram. Have been proceeding cautiously as I learn the machine. Doesn’t seem to be a whole lot of electrical on the 70’s bonnevilles but it’s enough to make me take my time.

the kill switch works fine but the front stop light does not (rear is fine). I’ll put that on my (growing) list. Interesting that the right hand switched apparently don’t have a purpose. Perhaps it’s a ‘vestigial’ switch from an earlier model.

vince
 

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Discussion Starter #229
Thanks, it’s an oak reading desk. Found it in a used furniture shop and was entranced by its beauty.
 

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Hi Vince,
Two black-sheathed wire bundles each have a small lamp attached.
speedo and tach backlights.
speedo and tach lights, to illuminate once the headlight is switched on.
+1. Be aware they're pretty crap in darkness. Consider LED replacements?

Also, I connect their 'non-Red' (Blue or Brown/Green?) wires into the White wires on my bikes. Means the speedo. and tacho. are illuminated any time the ignition's on, so I can see 'em even when I ride from sunlight into shade.

remove the wires from the warning lights?
pull straight out from the back of the black housings. You shouldn't need to mess with the center wire.
+1. When you come to rewire the bike, cut off the harness tape carefully all the way to any wire junction and cut the wire(s) there. The bulb holders are far superior to any 'replacement' available today; with original wire attached, you can reuse the holders just by cutting the attached wires to length and connecting appropriate terminals.

Both turn signal wirings run into the left handlebar switch assembly, though they may end up in the headlight assembly before routing to the main harness.
The turn signal switch is supplied by the Light Green/Brown wire from one terminal on the turn signal relay under the seat. Moving the switch left or right connects to the Green/Red and Green/White wires respectively.

The left handlebar switch cluster connects to the main harness with the two white plastic plugs on the right of this photo.:-



... wrapped in the main harness, you'll find two snap connectors, each connecting a short Green/Red or Green/White wire to the plastic plug, another short wire emerging to connect the corresponding front turn signal, a long wire to the rear of the bike to connect the rear turn signal and a wire to the idiot lamp.

When rewiring, I strongly advise cutting off all the white plastic plugs, driving wooden stakes through their hearts, shooting them with silver bullets and burying the remains in lead-lined coffins. 🤬 Throw away the short wires, attach normal bog-standard bullet terminals to the longer wire ends and connect 'em together in the snap connectors. (y)

The Right handlebar switches include
two mystery push- switches.
find the wiring diagram and familiarize yourself with the wire colors and components.
The twins wiring diagrams don't show the White/Red wire attached to one of buttons, because they didn't use it. It's for the electric-start - that particular cluster was first used on the T160, although one of the clusters all the way back to '71 has the wire, because the clusters were common to the whole '71 range, when the DOHC 350 Bandit and Fury should've been introduced and some versions would've had an electric-start.

Aside, when you rewire your bike and cut the white plastic plugs off the wires, be aware the end of the White/Red wire inside the headlamp shell must be insulated. The button also has a White wire connected, and White wires are energised by turning on the ignition switch - White/Red end not insulated and against the headlamp shell, button pressed accidentally will be a short-circuit. :(

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter #231 (Edited)
Hi Vince,



+1. Be aware they're pretty crap in darkness. Consider LED replacements?

Also, I connect their 'non-Red' (Blue or Brown/Green?) wires into the White wires on my bikes. Means the speedo. and tacho. are illuminated any time the ignition's on, so I can see 'em even when I ride from sunlight into shade.



+1. When you come to rewire the bike, cut off the harness tape carefully all the way to any wire junction and cut the wire(s) there. The bulb holders are far superior to any 'replacement' available today; with original wire attached, you can reuse the holders just by cutting the attached wires to length and connecting appropriate terminals.


The turn signal switch is supplied by the Light Green/Brown wire from one terminal on the turn signal relay under the seat. Moving the switch left or right connects to the Green/Red and Green/White wires respectively.

The left handlebar switch cluster connects to the main harness with the two white plastic plugs on the right of this photo.:-



... wrapped in the main harness, you'll find two snap connectors, each connecting a short Green/Red or Green/White wire to the plastic plug, another short wire emerging to connect the corresponding front turn signal, a long wire to the rear of the bike to connect the rear turn signal and a wire to the idiot lamp.

When rewiring, I strongly advise cutting off all the white plastic plugs, driving wooden stakes through their hearts, shooting them with silver bullets and burying the remains in lead-lined coffins. 🤬 Throw away the short wires, attach normal bog-standard bullet terminals to the longer wire ends and connect 'em together in the snap connectors. (y)



The twins wiring diagrams don't show the White/Red wire attached to one of buttons, because they didn't use it. It's for the electric-start - that particular cluster was first used on the T160, although one of the clusters all the way back to '71 has the wire, because the clusters were common to the whole '71 range, when the DOHC 350 Bandit and Fury should've been introduced and some versions would've had an electric-start.

Aside, when you rewire your bike and cut the white plastic plugs off the wires, be aware the end of the White/Red wire inside the headlamp shell must be insulated. The button also has a White wire connected, and White wires are energised by turning on the ignition switch - White/Red end not insulated and against the headlamp shell, button pressed accidentally will be a short-circuit. :(

Hth.

Regards,
Stuart, Thank you. A couple months out, I’m thinking of just removing the wiring harness, laying it out on the garage floor and tracing everything out... or at least replacing all the connectors with the snap connectors (I’ll need to search this thread for the exact type - they were brought up before). Is there a ‘kit’ of proper connectors and tools? Harbor freight (don’t know if you have this discount hardware store) always have electric wiring tools. Quality may be questionable but ... certainly, I wouldn’t use one of their connector kits. British wiring seems well received by forum members. When it’s time (that may come sooner than later) they will likely get some business from me. After a search, I’ve found that you (and others) have guided many folks through wiring... one Ronnieazma has a couple YouTube videos that are helpful in identifying connector types, etc.


Seems every time I start to do one thing, two other things make themselves known... it’s all interconnected. Like the great Scotsman and Patron of California, John Muir, said,

“When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find it hitched to everything else in the Universe.”

Vince
 

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Hi
I would be tempted to repurpose the redundant start button as a headlamp flash button.
It would take very little wiring.

regards
Peg.
 

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Hi Vince, I'm currently rewiring a '73 Bonnie. Similar wiring in concept to '76 but important differences in the switch consoles & what button/lever does what.

This machine had new harness installed 4k miles ago, but the harness was taped tightly & many wires fractured at the head tube from flexing. They were by passed from headlight shell to rear of bike. The rest of the wires were compromised in this area. Final straw is the headlight shell red wires fractured & the bulbs in headlight were seeking ground via the filaments in the other bulbs causing odd things to happen. Won't get into that.

So I had choice. Splice in all new wires at neck area, 14 conductors. Or... make new harness following the suggestions Stuart has made. Looking at the reproduction harness, other than the tight taping at head tube area, the workmanship was good. On the other and, size of wire was marginal at best. Yes it did work until the head tube wires started fracturing, but several wires were closer to 20-22 AWG stranded size. According to Britishwiring.com their 14 strand is approx. 18 AWG (strand). Their next size larger is 24 strand, approx. 14 AWG. They don't seem to offer 16 AWG or equivalent.

Comparing original wire size from '73 or '76 Triumph wire is a little thinner than 16 AWG strand. My '73 shop manual calls this 18 Imperial Standard Wire Gauge. Again, This 18G is thicker than 18 AWG stranded.

To be clear this are conductor sizes. Insulation thickness can vary so a fatter looking wire can be skinnier conductor if it has thicker insulation. So always go by conductor size.

I'd never heard of sizing wire by strand until I looked at Britishwiring web site. Makes no real sense as it depends on how thick each strand is.

In real life the wire harness electrically replicates the wire diagram, but the actual run or wires is much more complicated. Wire diagram doesn't show the convoluted routing of the red ground wires.

So far I have tagged every last wire connector, where it goes & what it's for. Removed old harness. Removed all tape & sleeving. Zip tied the wires such I can trace every wire, yet the "tree" of wire remains intact. It is most important to very carefully document the exact routing of wire harness.

I recommend you make your own paper copies of the real life wire harness showing where each wire is & how they are ran. All this will take many hours, but will pay huge dividends when you go to actually build the new harness.

This surprised me. The reproduction harness has many changes in wiring concept, yet the outcome is the same. They run wire a white wire all the way to stop light switch, flasher unit, then back to headlight switch to power the tail lights, dip switch, horn. Another white off ignition switch powers the coils via kill switch (button in this case).

Flasher unit out wire on factory harness is light green/brown. On repro harness it's green/black. All the other colors are correct.

It is a big job to make/install harness. Very doable. In your case repairing a harness, may be easier.

Should you desire to make a harness, you'll need the real Lucas crimper $100. You'll need pro quality crimpers for the spade type connectors that roll 2 tabs into conductor, 2 tabs into insulation. The "flag" type connectors must have dedicated end crimper size as you must crimp from the sides. Depending on the connector you'll have 1 or 2 conductors under each spade crimp, so you'll have to have both sizes of spade crimpers as well as spades. Bullets are same OD but the bore for wire where it's crimped varies. So you need to have different bore size bullets. Plus there are "ground" bullets which are hollow tubes shaped like smooth bullet. You strip wire a long ways, put wire in & fold the strands over outside of tube. Wire sleeve is the black wire jacket you see like wires to points, oil pressure switch, tail light harness etc. Comes in various diameters. Sleeve is what you see on your instrument illumination bulbs they pulled back into headlamp shell. Notice that size can take 4 conductors. Harbor Freight does not sell crimpers we can use for Triumphs.

Ground wire rings are another issue. The factory one at front rocker box doesn't seem to be sold so far as I can tell??We'll see what shows up.

My plan is to order all the wire color coded, connectors, sleeve, ground loops etc. When they arrive I can advise as to what real life shows it all to be & what I'd recommend to do. This will be be real life experience with the products from Britishwiring.

Strict proper color coding per '73 wire diagram will be observed. I recommend you do the same.

On the head tube area, I've many years experience with automotive & have repaired many harnesses in door jambs & trunk lid hinge areas. Many hundreds. I will tape the harness to near the flex area. Then tape the harness after the flex area, before the harness enters grommet at headlight. The flex area will have no tape whatsoever. It will be covered with loose fitting sleeve, zip tied to taped section of harness which then will be zip tied to back bone. This allows free flexing of wires & reduces fractured conductors to a minimum. Tightly taped wires in flex area guarantees fractured conductors.

If I were to buy new harness, I'd cut off the tight taping & install some sort of tubing. Split convoluted tubing, then wrap convoluted with tape works well, but doesn't look factory. Non split sleeve must be installed during assembly of harness. You can make it extra long & cut to length in place, but you can't make it longer...

As Stuart has suggested, I'd start by cutting out the plastic connectors in headlight & replacing them with bullets & snap connectors. You'll need the Lucas crimper. Get several extra bullets. Practice crimping. Not so straightforward as it seems. The ratchet effect on crimper only works with certain bullets & certain wire gauge. I will be able to advise on that after I gain experience with the 14 strand wires & the bullets.

In the mean time give me a good 3 weeks to gain the experience I need to make correct advise.

Here's photos, real life examples of what I'm talking about. Do you recognize the instrument bulbs? The 3 conductor harness inside rear fender to tail light is not shown. That is separate harness.

What you see in photo is tip of iceberg. Removing tape shows more damage. There are several fractured conductors inside insulation besides the totally fractured wires. A crinkle in insulation is a warning sign.
Don
 

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Hi Vince,
thinking of just removing the wiring harness, laying it out on the garage floor and tracing everything out...
Fwiw, I wouldn't, at least not to start with ... Ime, problem with that method is you'll then come across wire ends and you'll go, "Now wt* did that connect to? The wiring diagram says it might be that ... or it might be that ..."

Assuming you're a wiring newbie, you might like to consider how I did my first rewire (and still do on bikes I haven't worked on before)? I leave everything connected and, using a sharp scalpel-type knife (so I can hold it like a pen or a pencil for control), I cut off any harness covering (tape or cloth - carefully so I don't nick wires' insulation, in case I want to reuse them). The harness is then generally revealed in glorious Technicolor, which is a lot easier to follow than black lines with arcane letter codes.

From that, either I simply replace one wire at a time, strapping the new wire to a convenient frame tube with releasable reusable cable ties (on Triumphs - most Britbikes - I usually use the main frame spine tube over the engine and the frame tube under the left side of the seat (because a dry-frame's oil tank is under the right and oil always gets under wires there)).

Or, if I'm going to disconnect lots of wires at the same time, I first label their ends with the component they were connected to, using one of those label makers that prints on a sticky-backed strip.

However, if you do it this way, re. your John Muir quote, be aware:-

. The bullets (and snap connectors) on your bike are pretty-much unique to Britbikes, so no chance of finding them (or crimping tools) cheap at "Harbor Fright"; afaik, the only place you'll find them in the US is British Wiring, at Bullets & Snap Connectors and Bullet Crimping Tool

. Bullets crimp in a different way from spade terminals - crimping a bullet simply reduces its ID so it forms an interference-fit on the wire's conductor strands - if you click on the "Bullets" link, you'll see the top eight look similar but each has a different "strand" count.

. The problem with that arises if you just want to shorten and/or reuse an original wire - modern metric wire has a 0.3 mm. strand diameter whereas original wires on your bike have slightly-smaller Imperial strands (32SWG = #32 (British) Standard Wire Gauge = 0.274 mm.) ...

. Replacing a complete wires connected by bullets isn't a problem - the modern replacement wire is metric and modern bullets are still the same 3/16" (aka 4.7 mm.) OD as the original bullets on your bike. (y)

. It's just difficult to shorten an existing original wire and be sure a modern bullet crimped on the new end of it won't pull off each time you pull the wire out of the snap connector. (n)

or at least replacing all the connectors with the snap connectors
Whatever you do, replacing all the snap connectors (the black-insulated sleeves with bullet-terminated wires in each end) is wise. The black insulation covers one or more steel sleeves that should grip the bullets tightly; as they age, the steel sleeves can split lengthways, the insulation holds the sleeve together but not perfectly ... Hours Of Fun tracing the intermittent contact ...

As above, modern bullets are the same 3/16" OD as the existing bullets on your bike, so modern snap connectors will fit either. Btw, even if you just replace the snap connectors, I recommend Tool, Snap Connector Tool for pushing bullet terminals into new snap connectors.

John Muir
Yes, something of a legend hereabouts. :)

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Hi Peg, Vince,
repurpose the redundant start button as a headlamp flash button.
Aside, easier to do on a pre-'76 twin or, on a later twin, after the plastic plugs connecting the handlebar switch clusters to the main harness have been cut off and replaced with individual bullets.

With the plastic plugs, while the White/Red wire from the button is into one side of the plug, there isn't any corresponding wire in the main harness.

However, if the White/Red wire has an individual bullet, as suggested, easy to simply plug it into the Blue/White wires (headlamp main/high) snap connector.

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Hi Don, Vince,
Looking at the reproduction harness,
size of wire was marginal at best.
several wires were closer to 20-22 AWG stranded size. According to Britishwiring.com their 14 strand is approx. 18 AWG (strand). Their next size larger is 24 strand, approx. 14 AWG. They don't seem to offer 16 AWG or equivalent.
This is confusing.

The "new harness installed 4k miles ago" isn't specified but, if it isn't British-made (Autosparks or L.P. Williams's maker), ime foreign makers seem to have access to some odd wire sizes. :(

Otoh, here in GB, I have easy access to:-

. 9-strand metric wire; rated for 5.75 Amps, so perfectly acceptable even for a standard 60W quartz-halogen headlamp main beam (the relationship is Watts = Amps x Volts). I've used it since the first rewire I ever did, no problems; only downside is not all the standard Lucas colour combos. are available. BW sells some and the bullets to fit.

. 16-strand 'thinwall' (insulation) has individual strands only 0.2 mm. OD and a total conductor cross-sectional area of 0.5 sq.mm.; because of the insulation, it's rated for 11 Amps; downside is conductor is too thin for almost all available bullets (any available from BW).

"Britishwiring.com ... don't seem to offer 16 AWG or equivalent" because BW are supplied by Autosparks in GB, so BW wire is metric:-

. 14-strand metric has a 1 sq.mm. conductor cross-section (so is actually closer to 17AWG?), it's rated for 8.75A so more than adequate for pretty-much everything standard on a Britbike, except the wires to/from the battery, rectifier, Zener and ignition switch.

. The next-bigger standard metric size is 28 of the same-size individual strands, so 2 sq.mm. conductor cross-section, so is closest to 14AWG.

Comparing original wire size from '73 or '76 Triumph wire is a little thinner than 16 AWG
My '73 shop manual calls this 18 Imperial Standard Wire Gauge.
This 18G is thicker than 18 AWG stranded.
Uh-uh, the table in the manual is badly-labelled, you're extrapolating from it incorrectly.

The only wire used in any '71-on harness was designated by Lucas as "14/32" - 14 strands, each strand 32SWG. The table in the Triumph manual only goes down to 30SWG, I use Standard wire gauge - Wikipedia

Because a 32SWG strand is a smaller (0.274 mm.) diameter than a metric 0.3 mm.-diameter strand, by definition, 14 32SWG strands must have a smaller total cross-sectional area than 14 0.3 mm-dia. strands.

If you crimp a modern (e.g. British Wiring) "14 strand" bullet on to an original Lucas wire, it pulls off too easily, because the crimped metric bullet often cannot make a tight-enough interference-fit on the smaller Imperial conductor. :(

To confirm the comparative difference of the cross-section areas, same insulation, 14/32 is rated for 7.5A but 14/0.30 is rated for 8.75A.

I'd never heard of sizing wire by strand until I looked at Britishwiring web site. Makes no real sense as it depends on how thick each strand is.
It's a British bike. Originally made absolute sense to Lucas because the company knew the thickness of each strand; that information is now widely-known.

Should you desire to make a harness, you'll need the real Lucas crimper $100.
The one BW sells is only $75. Autosparks in GB sells the same one, or a cheaper one for ~$40, although p&p and possible US import duty could bump that above $75.

You'll need pro quality crimpers for the spade type connectors that roll 2 tabs into conductor, 2 tabs into insulation. The "flag" type connectors must have dedicated end crimper size as you must crimp from the sides.
A wider selection of ime good crimping tools are available much cheaper in GB from Autosparks and VWP . There are two types of "flag" terminals, buy the ones that can be crimped with the same tool as other spade terminals?

you need to have different bore size bullets.
(y)

Depending on the connector you'll have 1 or 2 conductors under each spade crimp, so you'll have to have both sizes of spade crimpers as well as spades.
:confused: Same spade crimp tool does terminals for much thicker wire than you'll ever fit on a Britbike.

I only use spades for "28 strand" wire (2 sq.mm. conductor cross-section). 'Conductor' part of the crimp only takes just over 1/4" conductor length; when fitting a thinner wire, I strip off just over 1/2" of insulation from the wire end, twist the strands together and fold that in half = just over 1/4". (y) When crimping the "roll 2 tabs into conductor", I "roll" the ends between the two parts of the folded conductor ... the wire'll break before the terminal pulls off. :)

Btw, bullet terminals, never twist the conductor stands together before fitting in the bullet, dunno why but the twisted strands end up too thick to fit into the bullet. :( Also, for obvious reasons. don't cut any strands when stripping the wire ...

Plus there are "ground" bullets which are hollow tubes
(n) I never use 'em. They're the same OD as the more-common bullets but the uncrimped wire can pull out. No-one needs the potential problems of a loose 'ground' wire with lots of exposed conductor flapping about loose inside the headlamp shell?

Ground wire rings
The factory one at front rocker box doesn't seem to be sold so far as I can tell?
BW calls 'em "Eyelets".

On the head tube area,
I will tape the harness to near the flex area. Then tape the harness after the flex area, before the harness enters grommet at headlight. The flex area will have no tape whatsoever. It will be covered with loose fitting sleeve, zip tied to taped section of harness which then will be zip tied to back bone. This allows free flexing of wires
You can do that but it's a faff, more so later if you need access to the wires. (n) :(

When doing the rewiring, turn the forks left and/or right before cutting a wire to length, so the finished wiring won't be stretched when the forks are turned that way.

Also before cutting a long wire apparently to correct length, I make a small loop around a finger, pencil etc. and then pass one of the securing cable-ties through it. A few weeks or months after the bike's back in use, I check the loops ... I've ceased to be surprised how many are much tighter ... if one isn't, much easier to cut a slightly too-long wire and crimp on a new terminal, than have to replace a too-short and stretched wire ...

When the wiring's finished, I cover the wiring between the headlamp shell and the frame with lengths of what Autosparks calls "Split Conduit" and VWP calls "Slit Convoluted Tubing". Same stuff but regrettably BW doesn't sell it; if you aren't buying anything else from either British seller, try the terms in eBay and/or your preferred internet search engine, it's common stuff. The "Split"/"Slit" is lengthways along the tube so it just slips over the finished wiring, the "Split"/"Slit" closes by 'memory' but the tube can simply be pulled off again if you need access to the wires.

Either cut the centres out of the standard headlamp and OIF frame grommets, or I replace 'em with Lucas Rubber Grommet : Hole Size 1 1/2" : Bore Size 1 1/4" - the latter are standard Lucas grommets so should be available in the US. I make the lengths of tubing over the wires long enough so the ends can be poked through the grommets to keep the tubing in position. (y)

Might not be "factory" but it works a damn' sight better and longer. (y)

If I were to buy new harness, I'd cut off the tight taping & install some sort of tubing.
BW/Autosparks harness isn't taped so tightly?

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Hi Stuart, This harness taped so tightly was thought to be purchased from BW. The crimping of the flag terminals at ignition switch looked poor to me. Brown/blue wires pulled out of terminal easily. This bike had several volt drops, but I didn't volt drop this terminal separately. By this time I was committed to making new harness.

Here's a photo on ignition switch terminal, & the wires that pulled out.

Regarding flag terminals, do you have a suggestion/seller that sells the flags you recommend? I simply cannot find the kind I think we have in mind for sale anywhere. I'd like to get some.
Don
 

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Hi Don,
thought to be purchased from BW.
Bring the problems to the attention of BW? Maybe stress they're known for supplying/producing quality harnesses and we don't want their (or Autosparks's) quality to drop?

suggestion/seller that sells the flags you recommend?
Vehicle Wiring Products. :)

Be aware, ime ease - or not - of crimping the 'conductor' part of those terminals will depend on your specific crimping tool - whether the part of your tool's jaws beside the M-shaped cutout will pass through the hole between the 'conductor' crimp part and the spade part.

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Hi Don,

Bring the problems to the attention of BW? Maybe stress they're known for supplying/producing quality harnesses and we don't want their (or Autosparks's) quality to drop?


Vehicle Wiring Products. :)

Be aware, ime ease - or not - of crimping the 'conductor' part of those terminals will depend on your specific crimping tool - whether the part of your tool's jaws beside the M-shaped cutout will pass through the hole between the 'conductor' crimp part and the spade part.

Hth.

Regards,
Hello Stuart,
Have you see a reasonably priced tool for crimping 6.3mm flag terminals? VWP say they don't stock, as they'e circa £90.
Cheers,
Mick
 

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Hi Mick
reasonably priced tool for crimping 6.3mm flag terminals?
Which flag type, VWP's or Autosparks's? Problem for recommendations is I've had my various crimpers for so long ... However, if it's any help, one of my crimpers that works on the VWP-type flag terminals is marked "Durite", you know they're a British automotive parts maker/seller?

I bought my original crimpers BI (Before Internet :)) so it was often a case of either spotting a particular tool in a shop or finding someone else had one I needed and asking him for his source.

Nevertheless, hth.

Regards,
 
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