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Hi T140Blue, Hope you have a nice vacation & thawed out. 60f, how nice is that. Like my weather...

Back to the bike. Kind of getting ahead of me. Did you measure pressure plate lift?
The adjuster screw for clutch rod hitting access plug in cover is basically normal & well known.. I've seen this many times & my bike did it. I will wear hole in plug over time. The cure is shorten adjuster screw as needed & cut new screwdriver slot. HOWEVER do this after all the other repairs are done. As your 3 ball cam is not adjusted properly as it is hitting main shaft. Often this is due to not having enough cable free play when adjusting rod. Often will hear a click, but not always when cam is over lifted. That's why I wanted you to measure lift first and adjust clutch rod properly. The fulcrum on bar lever is an important part of mix. We'll revisit this later after you get other items corrected.

Regarding stiff shaft, the shaft is supported at each end only. No support in center of engine case. So if screws are backed off & shaft moves freely the o-ring & bushing are ok. So if that's the case it does seem shaft is bent. Depending on where bend is I wonder if you could straighten it? I don't have much experaince on left foot shift, but maybe a crash hitting shift lever might bend the U crank or outer spindle?? I don't know how stiff these parts are & what is most likely to bend.

Does gear change quadrant move the gears freely when you move it with big channel lock pliers? Zig zag wheel at same time to align dogs in trans of course.

Now you can see how the pawls move out as gear change lever is moved & grab a tooth at a time on quadrant. Pretty clever! Does that all seem to move freely?

5 teeth are missing? From exactly which gear? That is unusual. The kicker gear, ratchet gears & ratchet teeth, bushing & the flat coil ratchet spring MUST BE PERFECT!! A slip of the kicker lever will cause sever knee damage.
I've not seen it, but I've heard kicking back can break teeth from ratchet pinion. Kicking back is caused by incorrect timing, lean carb idle circuit, not tickling enough, & very importantly not kicking hard enough. In any order.

Again verify you have 5 speed pawls.

Back to clutch drag, groove wear in basket & hub, wear in spider inside cush hub, can cause problems with drag. Owners get frustrated & try rod adjustments to help. Worn clutch parts never work right. We'll revisit that after you get clutch off.

I found the last set of photos were blurry especially with enlarged. Hard to see the details. Not really needed to repost them, but if possible try to get crisp photos. I know that's often not easy.

In every case get the later shifter springs 57-7051. I'll post photo showing older & new versions. Curved is improved version. Of course these won't cure binding shafts. Just makes good parts shift much better as lever is reliably centered. View attachment 716500 View attachment 716500
Don
Don: 4 teeth were missing from the kick start quadrant. Which part is the gear change quadrant? Also, only one picture is out of focus. The others are just what is inside the cover. Thanks, Mike
 

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Hi
The ones with the ‘X’ are usually fitted to the late T140E bikes, these have the black switch gear with small switches. Your 76 should have the earlier lucas switchgear with the paddle switches. The early and late levers pull the cable different distances.
Please heed Dons good advice on setting the pushrod adjustment with the the cable completely slack at the handle bar adjuster, if it is tight it can partially operate the mechanism before you adjust the pushrod, taking up your running clearances. Causing both the symptoms that you have of the actuator hitting the shaft and at the other end the pushrod adjuster hitting the inspection cap.
luckily it looks like there is only light contact, so no harm done.
Also do you recall if there was a gasket fitted, if this is left out then this can also reduce running clearances for the clutch and also move the gear selector pins closer to the quadrant, maybe affecting your gearchange.

to recap,
A) gasket missing
B) setup with cable tight
C) mismatched operating mechanism
All three of these items could cause the clutch actuator to foul on the mainshaft.

regards
Peg.
 

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Thanks much. There is a gasket on the clutch release cover and on the primary cover.
My issue is the shifter barely moves, and will not shift past 3rd gear. Only will downshift with engine off.
When I took all the bolts out holding the primary cover on, and moved the shifter lever, the cover moves in and out. That is what makes me suspect the shaft is bent.
When I take to cover completely off, the shaft moves fine.
The clutch does not release properly and I am going to remove it and eyeball it. Also have to replace the kick start gear. . 4 teeth missing. Thanks for the reply. Mike
 

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Don: 4 teeth were missing from the kick start quadrant. Which part is the gear change quadrant? Also, only one picture is out of focus. The others are just what is inside the cover. Thanks, Mike
Don: Here are a few more pictures. I took the springs out from the shifter quadrant. They appear to be the old style so I ordered new style ones. The clutch appears new , 12 plates, the springs appear new. BUT there is a considerable amount of rust built up on the clutch hub which I guess wasn't helping anything. The hub itself does not have any grooves in it that I can see. Thanks, Mike
 

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Hi Mike,
A binding cross shaft in the primary cover will stop the selector mechanism being automatically returned to centre by it’s springs. The selector pins will not come back far enough to pick up the next gear on the quadrant.

If you have the primary cover off, do not be tempted to put the gear lever back on and try it, this is a sure fire way to bend the cross shaft where it goes around the clutch.
If you need to try the gear change with the primary cover off, then a large spanner on the INNER edge of the ‘C’ section of the crossover shaft is the way to operate the gearchange mechanism without bending it.

Alignment is precise and it is a pig to get back straight. If it is bent, a chuck that you can rotate by hand and dial gauges are needed to get it back in perfect alignment.

good luck
 

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I think maybe I will buy a used one on ebay. I didnt try to operate it much, just enough to notice it seemed bent. I just uploaded more pictures. If you look closely at the splined end it has a big gash in it. Makes me suspicious....Let me know your thoughts on the rust spots on the clutch hub. Thanks again.Mike
 

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Hi T140Blue, Again that's one reason I wanted to know what lift was before tear down.

Regarding the x cam 57-7033X has superseded the original 57-4587 cam it would have originally came with in 1976. The X cam was introduced about 1979. Pretty much all sellers I know of sell the X cam by either part #. So it's one of the sad realities of dealing with old Triumphs. We must find work arounds. Good use parts are hard to come by these days. Genuine NOS in very hard to find also.

The difference is the length of the arm that cable hooks onto. The balls & cam lift per degree of rotation is the same. So the change in arm length changes the effective lift per inches of cable movement.

As I said prior, the bar lever fulcrum (also lever shape) determines inches of cable pull. Thickness of grip is a factor also. The lever/perch was changed at a point which changed cable pull. This required a change in ball cam lever length.

No matter. The X cam will work fine. Many have used it in earlier bikes without issues. I know that for a fact. Our own codeman has one in his '76 Bonnie motor in '70 Bonnie frame. It has been converted to right foot shift though. (Drum rear brake). I know the castings are different left foot to right foot. So it's possible casting places cam farther to left??

Any extra lift can be compensated for by adding more lever free play. So forget this for now. Since trans cover is off we'll have to revisit this later. But don't worry about it.

I'm looking for the measurements in my clutch notes, but can't seem to find it. I've got to record this info.

Please do me a huge favor. Using dividers please measure the arm length. From center of cam (best you can) to end of arm or where cable attaches. Whatever you feel is best. But.... photo it how you hold dividers so I can replicate it exactly. Let me now what it measures. I have spare NON X cam on hand. Thanks!!

Also I have spare right foot outer cover. With cam at rest, balls fully seated what is measurement from cover gasket surface to center of cam. That will establish a base line for that. At least on our covers.
Don
 

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T140blue, That sure is a pretty bike you have, hope you get it on the road soon! You have lots of good helpers chiming in with experienced advice and knowledge. Me, I'm just a dumb ole farm boy from Iowa, but I'd be getting all the rust out of that clutch housing! It can only be adding to your problem. Like my bike, yours must have sat for a period of time for the moisture to get in there and make a mess. If only these machines could talk! You stated early in this thread that this bike had undergone an expensive total rebuild. Somebody cut some corners IMO. If it were me, I'd be replacing the buggered up screws in some of your pics, the clutch adjust pin and nut, for example, are shot and cheap to replace. You're an experienced mechanic, so I'm preaching to the choir! I shopped gear change spindles on Ebay and saw some claiming to be NOS for about double the money of the other "used" listings. Seems that would be money well spent too. Good Luck!
 

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Hi T140Blue, The clutch parts look ok. Looks like cork plates. Some aftermarket plates are way thicker than original Triumph. 6 friction plate clutches demand 750 springs which are much stronger than 650 springs. The red springs are after market. I'll send spring & clutch adjustment info later. Aerco 7 plate kit is a good choice from Bonneville Shop. Used with 650 springs gives a much easier lever pull, good freeing, no slip. Also much easier on clutch cable.

750 springs are very hard on cable. Barnett cable is much stronger than any other. Easy to buy in USA, shop around for best price. From looks of your bars you'll need the 750 high bar cable. I have part #s & exact length. I'll post that if you want it. Again in USA only Barnett!! Trust me on this.

Clutch adjuster screw is in pressure plate very deep. A few reasons that could be. Looks like original uncut screw. The nut is junk. Ace hardware nut ground or turned thinner works good. Luckily most threads (but not all) are imperial (SAE) so easy to get here. The end of adjuster screw is hardened. Slotted end is not. So cutting shorter & making new slot is easy. if rod end of screw is good, I'd reuse it.

Looks like you may have minor grooving on basket & hub. I'd need more detailed photos to tell for sure. The rust should be cleaned, so I'd separate the parts, clean them, make sure roller bearing is not rusty. I'd take a new/sharp file & smooth if needed. New they are perfectly flat. Original little hub with taper is a fairly tight press fit into cush hub. It must be driven out or pressed is best. I made up a "puller" from an hold clutch basket & used threaded rod & washers to separate. Work over a towel or the like as the 20 rollers are loose. If cush hub pulls off little hub or is just barely press fit, it's probably LF Harris after market parts.

There are rubbers in cush hub that deteriorate. Not a big job to do them later. However should you decided to take cush hub apart, it has hex bolts accessed from back side. What looks like straight slot screw heads in photo are actually swaging!! This must be ground off completely to remove bolts. Obviously cush hub must be separated from basket to remove bolts. Repro rubbers inside hub are not durable at all. I've not used them yet, but urethane rubbers are available & users say they last good.

Does it look like teeth on kick start are broken, or are they made that way?? There are a few variations in the lead in teeth that are shortened by varying amount depending on version. I'd have to do some research on this to know if yours is made that way or not. I'm most curious about this.

I do know this. If... you clock kicker lever to horizontal before kick starting, it takes much less effort to start bike cold or hot. Many of us clock the lever down using clutch. Free clutch, bring motor to compression, pull clutch lever, clock kicker to horizontal & hold there. Let out clutch keeping tension on lever to keep ratchet engaged. Then kick swiftly without lifting lever. Really helps old guys like me to start. Also reduces kick back as the spin is much faster.

So I would not jump to replacing the gear unless the teeth were fractured. Photo is not that close but doesn't appear to be fractured.

750 motor sprocket is moderate press fit on crank. Use vibration damper puller. No need to back of chain tensioner. You need clutch hub puller. Clean threads well & make sure it's fully seated in hub. Only a few threads as you can see so it must screw in all the way.

The 3 row chain must be aligned properly per workshop manual. Not so easy to test. You need to install clutch plates & pressure plate & tension springs. This holds clutch basket tight against the hub. Turn motor & measure in several different places as both sprockets can have some wobble. Also main shaft can have some end play so push basket back & measure, pull out and measure. I make a spread sheet & record all measurements. Then find the average off set. That will tell what shims you need. Shims may be hard to find. I ended up getting them from ebay. Get several so you're covered for whatever you need. Avoid stacking a bunch of thin though. They come in 2 thicknesses. Also.. keep in mind the basket moves to center of motor as the thrust washer wears. So it's better to bias out than towards center of motor. Every one I check is never centered. Always at the inner or outer limit. Spend the time & the chain & parts wear less. I trial fit motor sprocket with a cut length 3/4" water pipe & flat washer. If crank sprocket is not tight with the nut you'll get false measurement. Very easy to spend 8-10 hrs + setting all this up. However careful work results in perfect operation. And you thought Porsches were complicated….

Make a clutch holder tool from some old plates & a metal bar. I used 1/4"nuts as spacer for handle. This puts the plate a little deeper into clutch so it's easier to hold. I like handle 18-20" or so long. About same length as torque wrench handle, like the one you use for lug bolts.

There is a formula I found over time for setting clutch springs. It's based on the factory stack height of all 12 plates. It is 1.400". The spring nuts are adjusted depending on how thick the actual stack is. Aftermarket plates have a huge variation. Some too thick, some too thin. Spring tension is fairly critical regarding slip. We'll get into that in detail during assembly.

Here's the holder tool which allows easy removal, torqueing of crank & clutch hub nuts. While you are at it be certain to put torque wrench on main shaft right end nut where the kick start gears are. I'd red Loctite on final assembly. Bend both tabs. This nut likes to back off!

If there is any local Triumph repair guys they will give you or sell cheap junk plates perfect for making tool with. I prefer the separate plates bolted together & the holder tool with steel plate. You push in the one deep & it holds basket straight while you work with crank nut. Also it's easier to slip onto clutch as 2 tools. Your choice as how you make it though.
Don
 

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T140blue, That sure is a pretty bike you have, hope you get it on the road soon! You have lots of good helpers chiming in with experienced advice and knowledge. Me, I'm just a dumb ole farm boy from Iowa, but I'd be getting all the rust out of that clutch housing! It can only be adding to your problem. Like my bike, yours must have sat for a period of time for the moisture to get in there and make a mess. If only these machines could talk! You stated early in this thread that this bike had undergone an expensive total rebuild. Somebody cut some corners IMO. If it were me, I'd be replacing the buggered up screws in some of your pics, the clutch adjust pin and nut, for example, are shot and cheap to replace. You're an experienced mechanic, so I'm preaching to the choir! I shopped gear change spindles on Ebay and saw some claiming to be NOS for about double the money of the other "used" listings. Seems that would be money well spent too. Good Luck!
Thanks for the input. The rust is on one are of the clutch basket and I have already managed to scrub it all off. probably was the side that was out of the oil bath while it was sitting.I do agree with replacing the mangled screws. I mean, if you have it all apart anyway... But thats just me. The whole reason for the tear down was to find out why the shifter is binding. Now it seems it may be bent slightly. I dont know it this is common, but I suspect not. And I was hoping to not have to remove the clutch hub etc the rplace it but that seems like where this is headed. Mike
 

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Hi T140Blue, The clutch parts look ok. Looks like cork plates. Some aftermarket plates are way thicker than original Triumph. 6 friction plate clutches demand 750 springs which are much stronger than 650 springs. The red springs are after market. I'll send spring & clutch adjustment info later. Aerco 7 plate kit is a good choice from Bonneville Shop. Used with 650 springs gives a much easier lever pull, good freeing, no slip. Also much easier on clutch cable.

750 springs are very hard on cable. Barnett cable is much stronger than any other. Easy to buy in USA, shop around for best price. From looks of your bars you'll need the 750 high bar cable. I have part #s & exact length. I'll post that if you want it. Again in USA only Barnett!! Trust me on this.

Clutch adjuster screw is in pressure plate very deep. A few reasons that could be. Looks like original uncut screw. The nut is junk. Ace hardware nut ground or turned thinner works good. Luckily most threads (but not all) are imperial (SAE) so easy to get here. The end of adjuster screw is hardened. Slotted end is not. So cutting shorter & making new slot is easy. if rod end of screw is good, I'd reuse it.

Looks like you may have minor grooving on basket & hub. I'd need more detailed photos to tell for sure. The rust should be cleaned, so I'd separate the parts, clean them, make sure roller bearing is not rusty. I'd take a new/sharp file & smooth if needed. New they are perfectly flat. Original little hub with taper is a fairly tight press fit into cush hub. It must be driven out or pressed is best. I made up a "puller" from an hold clutch basket & used threaded rod & washers to separate. Work over a towel or the like as the 20 rollers are loose. If cush hub pulls off little hub or is just barely press fit, it's probably LF Harris after market parts.

There are rubbers in cush hub that deteriorate. Not a big job to do them later. However should you decided to take cush hub apart, it has hex bolts accessed from back side. What looks like straight slot screw heads in photo are actually swaging!! This must be ground off completely to remove bolts. Obviously cush hub must be separated from basket to remove bolts. Repro rubbers inside hub are not durable at all. I've not used them yet, but urethane rubbers are available & users say they last good.

Does it look like teeth on kick start are broken, or are they made that way?? There are a few variations in the lead in teeth that are shortened by varying amount depending on version. I'd have to do some research on this to know if yours is made that way or not. I'm most curious about this.

I do know this. If... you clock kicker lever to horizontal before kick starting, it takes much less effort to start bike cold or hot. Many of us clock the lever down using clutch. Free clutch, bring motor to compression, pull clutch lever, clock kicker to horizontal & hold there. Let out clutch keeping tension on lever to keep ratchet engaged. Then kick swiftly without lifting lever. Really helps old guys like me to start. Also reduces kick back as the spin is much faster.

So I would not jump to replacing the gear unless the teeth were fractured. Photo is not that close but doesn't appear to be fractured.

750 motor sprocket is moderate press fit on crank. Use vibration damper puller. No need to back of chain tensioner. You need clutch hub puller. Clean threads well & make sure it's fully seated in hub. Only a few threads as you can see so it must screw in all the way.

The 3 row chain must be aligned properly per workshop manual. Not so easy to test. You need to install clutch plates & pressure plate & tension springs. This holds clutch basket tight against the hub. Turn motor & measure in several different places as both sprockets can have some wobble. Also main shaft can have some end play so push basket back & measure, pull out and measure. I make a spread sheet & record all measurements. Then find the average off set. That will tell what shims you need. Shims may be hard to find. I ended up getting them from ebay. Get several so you're covered for whatever you need. Avoid stacking a bunch of thin though. They come in 2 thicknesses. Also.. keep in mind the basket moves to center of motor as the thrust washer wears. So it's better to bias out than towards center of motor. Every one I check is never centered. Always at the inner or outer limit. Spend the time & the chain & parts wear less. I trial fit motor sprocket with a cut length 3/4" water pipe & flat washer. If crank sprocket is not tight with the nut you'll get false measurement. Very easy to spend 8-10 hrs + setting all this up. However careful work results in perfect operation. And you thought Porsches were complicated….

Make a clutch holder tool from some old plates & a metal bar. I used 1/4"nuts as spacer for handle. This puts the plate a little deeper into clutch so it's easier to hold. I like handle 18-20" or so long. About same length as torque wrench handle, like the one you use for lug bolts.

There is a formula I found over time for setting clutch springs. It's based on the factory stack height of all 12 plates. It is 1.400". The spring nuts are adjusted depending on how thick the actual stack is. Aftermarket plates have a huge variation. Some too thick, some too thin. Spring tension is fairly critical regarding slip. We'll get into that in detail during assembly.

Here's the holder tool which allows easy removal, torqueing of crank & clutch hub nuts. While you are at it be certain to put torque wrench on main shaft right end nut where the kick start gears are. I'd red Loctite on final assembly. Bend both tabs. This nut likes to back off!

If there is any local Triumph repair guys they will give you or sell cheap junk plates perfect for making tool with. I prefer the separate plates bolted together & the holder tool with steel plate. You push in the one deep & it holds basket straight while you work with crank nut. Also it's easier to slip onto clutch as 2 tools. Your choice as how you make it though.
Don
Don: I appreciate your thoughts and I think I owe you an explanation for not measuring the clutch movement. My initial concern was that the shifter shaft was binding. It would get stuck up or down.
My thinking was to remove the right side trans cover and see if anything was obviously wrong inside there. It was easy to do and I could quickly eliminate a bunch of issues.
I am familiar with the need to correctly adjust the clutch rod with zero tension from the cable / lever. I was pretty confident that that was not causing the shifter shaft to bind.
However once that was removed, the shifter shaft was still binding. It wasn't until I removed the primary cover that It moved freely. I am pretty convinced that the shaft is bent. I was hoping it wasn't, as I didnt want to have to pull the clutch hub. On a side note, closer inspection of the kick start gear does show the first 4 teeth were ground down. None show signs of fracture.
At this time I am going to see about getting another shaft and installing it. Then Ill make those measurements for the clutch release and report back. Thank you yet again for taking the time to walk me thru this. Regards, Mike
 

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Hi Mike, Very Welcome!
I did some checking & indeed it looks like the other ones that had a few shorter teeth were probably modified. So this mod gives you the clocking of the kicker lever without having to clutch it. I think that might be good idea. Interestingly BSA unit motors have the first several teeth flat out missing. I have very little BSA experience, I just stumbled upon that looking at photos.

One thing I should have pointed out is the stator wire is very fragile where it goes into stator. Be very careful to not bend or twist it. Even removing stator I'll warm black wire jacket with hair drier or heat gun on low. Don't overheat! Since you'll be trial fitting primary cover I'd disconnect stator wires and pull the wires through tube. The bullet connectors will need to be end to end to slip though tube. Warm the end some to give insulation more flexibility. Replace the seals for wire. Generally I black silicon the outside one or it seeps. Repro seals often don't fit tight like originals.

Very important to not allow rotor to sit without being surrounded by stator or using keeper strips around stator. Out naked it looses magnetism. So I remove stator & then immediately remove rotor & stick it in. Actually I use keepers that came on a new rotor, but you get the point. This is why swap meet rotors are almost always weak. Don't stress over removal/install time, but sitting out naked on bench is not wise.
Don
 

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Don: I attached a link T 140V primary cover two videos for you to look at. ( click on the T 140v primary cover to see the video on you tube) I spoke with the engine builder and he said the primary cover may be the issue. He said it was a replacement from JRC parts and some were not well made. Have you ever heard of this? I put the cover on with just one bolt ( loose) for alignment. Watch what the cover does when you move the shifter. It moves up and down. I am starting to wonder if maybe I have a poorly manufactured cover. Your thoughts? Anyone else ever see this? Thx, Mike
 

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Hi Mike, I hadn't considered the bushing being crooked. Since the shaft is only supported at 2 ends it would be expected the cover would wobble if you move gear lever with screws backed off.

Aftermarket cover could be a problem for sure. If.... the bushing is installed/drilled crooked it will bind.

Bent shaft could be hard to tell without lathe or the like. But, could you very carefully counter hold shaft & see if cover still wobbles? Or make some tests with shims at gasket surface changing alignment of bushing? Holding cover very close to case does shaft want to off set cover? Now turn shaft 180deg. How has offset changed? I've never attempted to put shaft in 180 out so I don't know if that's possible.

Or lay cover on flat surface like a table top. (Wife not home). Put shaft in cover sticking upwards. Have assistant move shaft to & fro while you sight it. See if you can see a bias of the play in bushing indicating bushing is crooked or shaft is bent. By rotating shaft & several sightings you might?? be able to tell if bushing is crooked or shaft bent or both...

If bushing is crooked could you sand or ream it to fit? Since shaft moves it might not be too far out?? The oring is not very big so that's a concern. I don't know if size is available, but the X profile O-rings might compensate enough??

Could you flex/bend cover if bushing is crooked. I've never tried that either.

Speaking of primary covers I'm working with friend on '73 T140. Has damaged cover. Ebay used covers are junk. 3 row chain motor the cover is changed. The area around alternator is thinner & machined at back of the 3 threaded holes for clearance. The timing pointer is shorter. The lower rear screw bosses are machined for chain clearance. That's just the ones I know of for sure. There may be more. Almost all sellers have photos. The early cover has screw holes with a boss so hole is blind. They show photos of the correct cover. Yet send an earlier cover. The repro casting not only has the unmachined bosses, but the casting is overall thicker. Crazy thing is sellers say they sell to T140 owners with no complaints. That's impossible. Only Classic British Spares is familiar with the fit as he's ran into this. He checked stock. No stock. He was going to order from LF Harris (they seem to be only one making them). They could no supply correct cover. So now owner is measuring up new cover to see if he can grind backside to make it fit. At the same time some new covers come with gasket surface out of flat. (Triumph did that too on occasion). Has been a difficult & costly fight. The casting # in covers is same for 2 row & 3 row chain so that's no help.

If you think Harris parts are bad, try Wassell. They are often worse by a margin.

I'm so sick & tired of fighting to get quality parts that fit.
Don
 

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This cover has no casting numbers at all.As far as the cover moving with the shaft. if I pop it up against the engine ( no tight bolts) and move the shaft it pops away from the engine case. Thanks what makes me wonder if there is a misalignment with the shifter shaft hole relative to the whole cover.
I did call the builder and he said it was a replacement from JRC. He said they have had issues with them.
The Bonneville Shop has a Cover made by LM Harris. ( $150.00) They said if it does not fit properly I can return it. ( less shipping and a 20% restocking fee)
I did buy a used shaft on Ebay and a clutch puller. I guess Ill wait for the shaft, see what that does. Thank you once again. Mike
 

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Don: Problem solved!
I took a closer look at the cover and noticed when it was going on, the bolts around the stator didnt line up with the holes they go in very well.
So I reamed them out a little and things fit better. But the cover still wobbled when I tried to push it close to the engine case. I decided to take it off and see if it was flat.
I took your advise and put the cover on my granite counter top. ( My wife is cool) It wasn't. Approx 1/8 inch gap towards the top rear. The rear surface was high making the whole cover wobble from side to side. I filed down the high spot, put it on, bike now shifts.
I decided to get a new cover, just bought it from The Bonneville shop on Ebay and 2 inspection plugs. I would encourage anyone who has a " stiff" shifter to remove the cover and check to see if it is flat and the holes for the bolts around the stator line up. If not lay down a big sheet of sand paper on a flat surface and slide it around until all surfaces are clean. ( Then its flat) Then ream the bolt holes a little for an easy fit. Might need gasket sealer behind the copper washers. Thank you thank you and everyone else who added info. Sometimes its easy to ignore the obvious. Mike
 

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Hi
If the Bonneville shop has sold you a cover manufactured by LF Harris, I believe that you may get a cover based on the post 1982 late T140E. The late cover has am enlarged ‘boss’ where the crossover shaft exits. The boss is machined to take a proper oil seal, thus reducing the potential for an oil leak.
If you receive this late type cover, you will need to add the seal. Luckily it is the same seal as the kickstarter shaft seal and is readily available (57-1956).

regards
Peg.
 
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