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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
Hope everyone is enjoying the terrible weather down here in melbourne!

I'm wanting to make custom brake lines for my front end to fit with taller handlebars and the information on forums out there is a bit diluted as to what exactly you need, so hopefully someone can help me and we can help others on the way!

I'm looking at the goodwill's catalog for parts:

http://goodridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Goodridge-Catalogue-Performance-Parts.pdf

So for the hose i would use "600 series -03 braided hose on page 26 (Part number 600-03CL)

Then for the fittings from the master cylinder to the top yoke i believe i would need:
Straight male convex seat part number: 441 on page 27,
and straight male bulkhead part number:443-03 on the same page, correct?

And then i'm not completely sure what fitting's are needed for the hose from the bottom yoke to the fork slider's metal hose tube,
But i'm guessing it would be:
Straight male convex seat part no 441-03 like on the top joke,
And a straight female concave seat part no 6001-02-03 for the fork slider's metal hose tube.

Please let me know if anyone can confirm these fittings, i'm at a loss as to how to find the right ones!

Thank you everyone,
Have a great day.

Kind regards,
Tuco.
 

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Hello all,
Hope everyone is enjoying the terrible weather down here in melbourne!

I'm wanting to make custom brake lines for my front end to fit with taller handlebars and the information on forums out there is a bit diluted as to what exactly you need, so hopefully someone can help me and we can help others on the way!

I'm looking at the goodwill's catalog for parts:

http://goodridge.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/Goodridge-Catalogue-Performance-Parts.pdf

So for the hose i would use "600 series -03 braided hose on page 26 (Part number 600-03CL)

Then for the fittings from the master cylinder to the top yoke i believe i would need:
Straight male convex seat part number: 441 on page 27,
and straight male bulkhead part number:443-03 on the same page, correct?

And then i'm not completely sure what fitting's are needed for the hose from the bottom yoke to the fork slider's metal hose tube,
But i'm guessing it would be:
Straight male convex seat part no 441-03 like on the top joke,
And a straight female concave seat part no 6001-02-03 for the fork slider's metal hose tube.

Please let me know if anyone can confirm these fittings, i'm at a loss as to how to find the right ones!

Thank you everyone,
Have a great day.

Kind regards,
Tuco.
Hi Tuco.

I went Venhill.

Sure it's further away but what you pay in extra shipping is balanced out with GST savings.
Buy from you UK and save on VAT (until July anyway).

I also took the opportunity to add Venhill's hydraulic rear brake light switch (junk the mickey mouse mechanical switch which is prone to going west).
It comes with an electrical cable which you run into the Headlight Shell.
Join the 2 wires (1 wire to white which is switched power and the other wire to brown which goes to the brake lamp), simple.

I have the 1977 Bonnie with high bars.
My line length was 900 mm.
You need to calculate your own length.

The best way to work out your line length is to run a length of tubing from the master cylinder to the caliper and measure the length.
Don't forget to move your steering around to get maximum length you need.
Try to be precise as you can't snip it to length.
A loose hydraulic line is a bad look.



I anchored my hydraulic line by bolting a Venhill Cushioned Clamp to the Bottom Yoke "Left Pinch Eye Bolt" (97-4476).

These are the parts you need.


  • 710375-L 3/8" UNF-24 "Banjo Bolt with light switch (screws into your master cylinder brake assembly)
  • 3/60087LS M10 45deg + 20deg left bend stainless (sandwhiches between brake switch banjo and master cylinder)
  • 3/60375AS 3/8" UNF Convex Male Adapter - Stainless (screws into caliper)
  • C101-10 10mm copper washer pack - 10 (fits between banjo parts)
  • 3H900-BK 900mm Black Hose - 1/8bsp swivel nuts (depends on your hose length - comes in 25mm increments-screws on at each end).
  • CC2 Cushioned hose clamp (attach this to the triple tree eye bolt to secure your line).

Done.

https://www.venhill.co.uk/hydraulic...s-lines-and-fittings/line-lengths/3h0900.html

https://www.venhill.co.uk/hydraulic...fittings/powerhose-plus-banjos/3-60087ls.html

https://www.venhill.co.uk/hydraulic...ttings/powerhose-plus-adapters/3-60375as.html

https://www.venhill.co.uk/hydraulic...ngs/pressure-switch-banjo-bolts/710375-l.html

https://www.venhill.co.uk/hydraulic...fittings/accessories-amp-washers/c101-10.html

https://www.venhill.co.uk/hydraulic...and-fittings/accessories-amp-washers/cc2.html

Best of all, hoses are approved TUV and DOT and marked so you shouldn't have any Registration issues.


R R
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Hi Tuco.

I also took the opportunity to add Venhill's hydraulic rear brake light switch (junk the mickey mouse mechanical switch which is prone to going west).
It comes with an electrical cable which you run into the Headlight Shell.
Join the 2 wires (1 wire to white which is switched power and the other wire to brown which goes to the brake lamp), simple.
I don't have a hydraulic rear braking system, my bike's a bitsa, should've mentioned it :wink2:

I have the 1977 Bonnie with high bars.
My line length was 900 mm.
You need to calculate your own length.

The best way to work out your line length is to run a length of tubing from the master cylinder to the caliper and measure the length.
Don't forget to move your steering around to get maximum length you need.
Try to be precise as you can't snip it to length.
A loose hydraulic line is a bad look.

I'm wanting to use the stock steel tubing between the tripple tree's and between the slider and the calliper, so i'm wanting to cut my own length of wiring to fit,
avoiding having it as one long hose as you do as i like the organised look the steel tubbings provides.


If i can't find enough information as to assembling my own re-usable hose and fittings i will surely take your path, thank you for the information, i've book marked the parts you linked for future reference.

(EDIT)
[*]3/60087LS M10 45deg + 20deg left bend stainless (sandwhiches between brake switch banjo and master cylinder)
I don't have a brake switch banjo on my front end as Australian road rules don't require a front brake switch on pre "75 bikes, what banjo bolt do i use instead if i were to go this route?
 

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I don't have a hydraulic rear braking system, my bike's a bitsa, should've mentioned it :wink2:
No problem Tuco.

The parts I summarized only refer to the front.

In other words, when you activate the front brake, the rear brake light comes on. :wink2:

I'm wanting to use the stock steel tubing between the tripple tree's and between the slider and the calliper, so i'm wanting to cut my own length of wiring to fit,
avoiding having it as one long hose as you do as i like the organised look the steel tubbings provides.


If i can't find enough information as to assembling my own re-usable hose and fittings i will surely take your path, thank you for the information, i've book marked the parts you linked for future reference.

(EDIT)

I don't have a brake switch banjo on my front end as Australian road rules don't require a front brake switch on pre "75 bikes, what banjo bolt do i use instead if i were to go this route?
I can understand the aesthetics of your path. The lower steel tubing is pretty cool.

My thinking was simplicity, less bits to go wrong, but at the same time retain the classic bike look with the black tubing over the braided line.

Also only 2 points (one at each end of the line) where something can go wrong.

The other problem you may encounter (once the master cylinder assembly is pulled apart for inspection and or repair) is the mechanical brake switch components are very touchy.

Also re consider buying any lines which you terminate yourself.
Under Victorian legislation they aren't street legal without individual certification.

On the other hand TUV & DOT marked factory terminated lines are approved.

You might encounter registration issues and or Insurance issues.

The other thing on my mind is that the Federal Govt is currently considering GST & a customs levy on all imported items after June 2018.

All imports will become more expensive overnight. :crying:
 

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I don't have a brake switch banjo on my front end as Australian road rules don't require a front brake switch on pre "75 bikes, what banjo bolt do i use instead if i were to go this route?
Hi T.

Triumph never supplied a hydraulically activated brake light switch to their T140 range, even after 1975.
It was done mechanically within the right switch block with wires travelling to the headlight via the switchblock grey sheathed cable running along the handelbars.

Venhill's Pressure Switch/Banjo is an eloquent way of doing away with the mechanical fitting which is known to be unreliable.



If you dispense with the pressure switch/banjo bolt then you can complete the Venhill installation with:

3/8" UNF DOMED SINGLE BANJO BOLT STAINLESS STEEL


https://www.venhill.co.uk/hydraulic...ings/powerhose-plus-banjo-bolts/110375ds.html

You'll still need the 45deg & 20deg Adapter as it'll orientate your line nicely.


I'm not familiar with legal requirements for brake switches, but doesn't the 1974/75 Speed Twin come wired to power the rear brake light when activating the front brake?




R R
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Triumph never supplied a hydraulically activated brake light switch to their T140 range, even after 1975.
It was done mechanically within the right switch block with wires travelling to the headlight via the switchblock grey sheathed cable running along the handelbars.

Venhill's Pressure Switch/Banjo is an eloquent way of doing away with the mechanical fitting which is known to be unreliable.
Ah my apology, i was mistaken in thinking the later year rear disk brake bikes used suck brake light switches (My knowledge past 70's triumph is very low)

The mechanical brake switch on my master cylinder/brake lever broke a long time ago by the looks of it... I can understand why it's known to be unreliable.

If you dispense with the pressure switch/banjo bolt then you can complete the Venhill installation with:

3/8" UNF DOMED SINGLE BANJO BOLT STAINLESS STEEL


https://www.venhill.co.uk/hydraulic...ings/powerhose-plus-banjo-bolts/110375ds.html

You'll still need the 45deg & 20deg Adapter as it'll orientate your line nicely.
Awesome, thanks a lot for your knowledge, if i get in trouble with registration then i better just do it your way, i'll measure up a tube and order the parts! Thank you!

I'm not familiar with legal requirements for brake switches, but doesn't the 1974/75 Speed Twin come wired to power the rear brake light when activating the front brake?

R R
It does, but my bike has a long history of junky builders and bar mechanics tinkering with it, most of the switches have stopped working by now!

Kind regards,
Tuco.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
No problem Tuco.

The parts I summarized only refer to the front.

In other words, when you activate the front brake, the rear brake light comes on. :wink2:
Ah, i'm stupid, apologies!



I can understand the aesthetics of your path. The lower steel tubing is pretty cool.

My thinking was simplicity, less bits to go wrong, but at the same time retain the classic bike look with the black tubing over the braided line.

Also only 2 points (one at each end of the line) where something can go wrong.

The other problem you may encounter (once the master cylinder assembly is pulled apart for inspection and or repair) is the mechanical brake switch components are very touchy.

Also re consider buying any lines which you terminate yourself.
Under Victorian legislation they aren't street legal without individual certification.

On the other hand TUV & DOT marked factory terminated lines are approved.

You might encounter registration issues and or Insurance issues.

The other thing on my mind is that the Federal Govt is currently considering GST & a customs levy on all imported items after June 2018.

All imports will become more expensive overnight. :crying:
Yep, You've convinced me, i'll report back with my findings once i've ordered and installed.

Thanks so much for the information R R!
 

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It does, but my bike has a long history of junky builders and bar mechanics tinkering with it, most of the switches have stopped working by now!

Kind regards,
Tuco.
In regards to legalities I can get a little over cautious. :frown2:

I sometimes have visions of being involved in an accident situation where insurance assessors crawl over my machine.

I'd hate to have an insurance claim denied based on technicalities such as non compliant brake parts. 0:)

Many insurance companies are fantastic when it comes to accepting premiums but we often hear of horror stories when claimants are denied. :eek:


PS:
If you do order the 710375-L 3/8" UNF-24 "Banjo Bolt with light switch which screws into your master cylinder brake assembly, you might find the under head thread length is 24 mm but it should be no longer than 19 mm or 20 mm.

I overcame this by carefully cutting 4 mm of length with either a fine hacksaw or stainless steel angle grinder cutting blade.

Also, the electrical cable on the pressure switch isn't quite long enough to get to the headlight.
I fixed this by soldering two lengths of electrical cable to the correct length, insulating the solder points with shrink wrap and fitting black plastic tubing from the banjo to the end of the wires.

Nothing is ever is totally straight forward.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Nothing ever is totally straight forward.
)
It would be boring if it was!

And i'll see how i go, i'm trying to go for the uncluttered look and always use my rear brake in conjunction with my front so the brake light always comes on,
plus it is up to the road worthy standards for pre 75 vehicles to not have a brake light switch on the front brake,
so i doubt they would make a fuss about it if a claim was made.

Having said that safety first so it's probably a good idea to get the brake switch..... >:)
 

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Hi,

Which year was it
'79-on, with the change to black switch clusters and different master cylinder mounting. The pressure switch is mounted between the yokes, behind the headlamp.

I'm pretty-certain we covered its possible use during the threads on your bike's brake hoses but you decided against it in the end.

Hth.

Regards,
 
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