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hello all just bought a 1973 bonneville 750 with the intention of restoring it i would like to get the frame powdercoated but am worried that having the oil in frame that oil will leach out and during the process and ruining the powdercoating i'm sure others have had their 73 frames powdercoated and would like any advice on cleaning/degreasing the interior or maybe having it sealed thanks in advance

cw
 

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Clean the oil 'tank' out with rag before sending the frame away. The powdercoating process involves warming the frame to 'bake' the coating.

Replace the sump cover to close off the bottom of the frame, and the filler cap to close off the top. The covers will also get a coating, so you may want new ones at the end of the process.

The frame may need to by blasted clean so seal off any tubes where oil lines attach. A short piece of rubber hose with an old bolt in the free end will do. Plus a jubilee clips to hold it all in place. You need to be absolutely sure the oil tank is sealed off.

Also close off the steering head to keep the bearing housing clear. I used a couple of large 'penny' washers with a piece of studding through them to hold them in place.

When you rebuild the bike bear in mind that the thick coating will electrically insulate pieces bolted to it, so you may need to either scrape paint off where the air filter and rear mudguard attach or run additional earth wires to the zener diode and rear lights / indicators.

The coating is quite thick, so you may have to scrape out bolt holes where engine plates attach when you re-assemble the bike.

I had my T140 frame done years ago, it still looks good, not as glossy black as the original but plenty good enough for me.
 

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A professional powdersoater has bins full of every size rubber bung that they use to plug all holes (including very large ones for head bearing races), and special tape that they use to tape over all threaded studs, etc.

You DEFINITELY want to flush, wash, and rinse the oil cavity thoroughly, then blast dry with compressed air. Ask your powdercoater to allow the freshly sandblasted frame a turn in the oven BEFORE the coating process.

Nutting and bolting with large washers on all the engine mounting tabs, swingarm areas and axle areas is very important, these CANNOT have powdercoating or your engine and suspension will never be secure.
 

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"Nutting and bolting with large washers on all the engine mounting tabs, swingarm areas and axle areas is very important, these CANNOT have powdercoating or your engine and suspension will never be secure."

I've never power coated anything, and would like to know why.
If i understand right, your not to power coat any place you have two peices of metal coming together??? like trees, or fenders, yet leaving these area open to rust doesn't sound right, so what do you do, hand paint then with a brush???

Cleaning the frame is simple. Steam it , amd than run some metal prep thru it....after you paint it spray it inside with WD 40....
 

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you can power coat anything you want!!! as long as you have a wire wheel or grinder to take the paint down in (contact areas) exp: fender meets folk bolt holes.

powercoat can add 1/16th/ 1/32th of inch to the surface.

thats why you tape some areas off or the will be a press fit after.


as far as the frame no bearing!! no grease!! no oil!! no rubber!! or most powercoaters will not do!!! the oven are cooked with others people's parts and yours and they will not take the risk of it spraying on others parts. 400f will cook everything you don't take off

oil tank leave closed for sand blast but they will have to open to cook or you have your hands on a bomb!!

wash like hell to get any dust,sand etc out and away you go
 
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