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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi,

This summer I acquired a fully-dismantled T100R, with 32,000 miles on the clock.

It's a UK spec and registered bike, stripped in 1982 for repair, but somehow never re-built. Some preparatory work had been done (big end journals re-ground, barrels rebored) and there were some new parts, but most showed all the signs of having been stored in the wet corner of a garage for 37 years. All of the perishables were, well, perished and a significant number of the small parts were missing. But, importantly, all of the big bits were there. Along with the rust, corrosion and cobwebs.

I bought it from a friend of the 2nd owner, who'd finally admitted that he was never going to re-build it, and he asked his friend to sell it. Effectively, I'm the 3rd owner. The friend, with BSA's, MZ's, a Panther, and much more, felt that he had at least one too many projects already.

I rode thousands of miles in the late '70s on a 68 T100T, commuting stupid distances, but when I saw the light and changed jobs, the bike had to go. A new family and a mortgage needed the money more than I needed a reliable, old friend.

Over the years I hankered after another, but a busy life and family duties meant that I had no time until, eventually, the birds had flown, I'd retired and I had the resources.

With a reasonable workshop doing nothing, I got bored, and so I bought a non-runner 1973 Tiger 750 TR7RV Canadian import and got that going as a project, never expecting to see a Daytona that would suit me. And just as I did, the T100R appeared.

A long day out in the car and the bits were all in my garage. Three and a bit months later, it was on the road on the original registration number, this time as an Historic Vehicle. I've kept as many of the original parts as I can, seeking to maintain originality. The major parts changed were exhausts, front mudguard, rims and spokes, handlebars and headlight and headlight shell, but only because they were beyond practical recovery. The only concessions I've made to modernity are Boyer ignition, and a combined regulator/rectifier.

The black parts were blasted and powder coated, the mudguards and tank professionally painted in (as far as I can ascertain) the original colours and layout for the date of manufacture (December 71). The alloy parts were vapour blasted, the carbs sonically cleaned.

Whilst I used professionals for welding repairs (oil tank and chain guard), the cleaning , powder coating and painting, and the wheel building, I researched and sourced all the parts, and screwed it all together.

All the perishables I changed - so the loom, all seals, brake linings, clutch hub, cables and any bearings where necessary. All the fasteners are new, either stainless or zinc plated. The purists will complain, but this is a rider, not an ornament with no oil in it.

I've now done 250 gentle miles on it with no issues, other than a few minor oil leaks which I've gradually eradicated. Other than a drip every few days from the sump plug, it's oil tight. Given a weep from a rocker box that is.... I've opened it up a few times and it's been lively and not too buzzy. But, I'll be keeping the revs down in the interests of maintaining the longevity of a near-50 year old machine with fully matching numbers.

The Tiger's done 1000 miles this summer, is a torquey, oily, stump-pulling animal and is this winter's project. A different bike to the Daytona, but just as much fun to ride.


https://flic.kr/s/aHsmGTZq7P
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Wow, very nice restoration!

You covered the history well, and condensed the narrative down quite neatly.

...of course, I would have liked to have heard each gritty detail 3 or 4 photos at a time!
Thank you. I aimed for a rider, a restoration where necessary, but keeping as much as I could in original condition. So the forks are largely untouched - I polished up the seal holders and fitted new rubber boots over the springs, and painted the sliders.

The cycle parts had to be painted - so I went for powder coating the interests of longevity.

The only major repairs were to the oil tank and the chain guard. The bike had been dropped, and the oil tank was dented (presumably by the kickstart) and one of the mounting lugs torn off, the other was just hanging on. My local tame welder (he's actually a real artist in welding - if it can be welded, he can weld it - very clever guy) cut out the back of the tank, pushed out the dents as much as he could, then welded it all back up and put back the lugs. The powder coater then coated the front of the tank 4 or 5 times, flatting in between, to build up the remaining dent and leave a perfect surface.

The restorers also spotted that the chain guard was worn through, so the welder fixed that too.

The restorers checked over all the engine bearings and changed those that needed it - they have an oven big enough - I don't. They also refitted the cam pinions as I didn't have a pinion tool at that time, but unfortunately they used the wrong marks on the cam pinions and when I gently turned the engine over when I'd fitted the rocker boxes, the valves and pistons met. A bit of thinking and I bought the pinion tool and refitted the pinions to the correct marks and all was well.

I did try to use the Lucas 6CA points assembly and the original AAU, but neither were in great shape so in the end I went for a Boyer system.

Essentially, I gave the specialists a car boot full of rusty big bits, they gave me back a boot full of shiny black bits. I also gave them the barrels and the engine case halves for cleaning and checking, and they gave me back those bits, vapour blasted and mechanically checked over.

I checked over everything else, and those bits that looked past it were replaced. Otherwise I kept everything I could.

So, I took a pile of bits, cleaned up some myself, and screwed it all back together over about a 2 month period. There were no real dramas, it all went together OK. I took my time, bit my lip or found something else to do when waiting on a part I'd forgotten to order, I checked end floats and clearances as I went and found nothing wrong, or nothing that I could see was wrong. I torqued up those fasteners for where a torque setting is available, and used common sense and feel for those that
don't.

I asked a mate with a couple of old bikes (Beezas and a Norton) for his opinion where I wasn't sure, then made up my own mind.

Probably the hardest part of the re-build was repairing the two Lucas console switches on the 'bars. Getting them to work reliably was tricky, particularly as one of the screws holding the plastic frame into the switch was sheared off flush with the housing so no easy way of getting it out. In the end I use epoxy and it seems to be fine.

I ended up with the rusty and corroded bits in one shiny piece. Which started very easily and has ever since.

Not sure a few pages of text could add much more than the photos show!

Subsequently, when re-torquing the head, I found the central 4 bolts were loose, then discovered that I needed the earlier washers to go with those 4 head bolts. Fitted those and it's been fine ever since.

The decals arrived today, so I can now finish the finishing-off!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
An update.

A few weeks ago, and after waiting for suitably dry weather to try out my new LED headlight bulb, I decided that it was time to put the Daytona to bed for the winter. Accordingly, I started it up to warm up the oil. That proved to be tricky. I'd not started it for 2 or 3 weeks, and normally it fires up first kick, but this time it took much more effort and then only ran on one cylinder for a couple of minutes. When it did fire on 2 it was clearly not happy. I concluded that the pilot jet on one carb was probably at least partly blocked.

After much consideration, mainly revolving around that the carbs were the original, and had done 33k miles, whilst they worked there is clearly considerable potential for them to be worn out. So, 2 new Amal Premier carbs were ordered and they arrived today. The Premier carbs cost about £20 more per carb, but have a removable screw to allow you to clean out the pilot jet passages. Well worth the money I suggest.

First job was to strip the new carbs and clean them out - which is just as well because the insides of the slide bores were covered in machining debris - not much ali swarf, but a good coating of grey muck. I blew out all of the passages with aerosol carb cleaner. There were a few tiny flakes of ali on the paper covering my bench when I'd finished.

The carbs came ready jetted for the Daytona and all I had to do is fit them. I now need to pressure oil the throttle and choke cables. Just done the front brake (using 10W fork oil) and the difference is amazing - really slick now. I hope that the carb cables will be as good.

20200108_170723.jpg


I've a Norton-type oil filter on the way too - stand by for the fitting and photos.
 

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An update.

A few weeks ago, and after waiting for suitably dry weather to try out my new LED headlight bulb, I decided that it was time to put the Daytona to bed for the winter. Accordingly, I started it up to warm up the oil. That proved to be tricky. I'd not started it for 2 or 3 weeks, and normally it fires up first kick, but this time it took much more effort and then only ran on one cylinder for a couple of minutes. When it did fire on 2 it was clearly not happy. I concluded that the pilot jet on one carb was probably at least partly blocked.

After much consideration, mainly revolving around that the carbs were the original, and had done 33k miles, whilst they worked there is clearly considerable potential for them to be worn out. So, 2 new Amal Premier carbs were ordered and they arrived today. The Premier carbs cost about £20 more per carb, but have a removable screw to allow you to clean out the pilot jet passages. Well worth the money I suggest.

First job was to strip the new carbs and clean them out - which is just as well because the insides of the slide bores were covered in machining debris - not much ali swarf, but a good coating of grey muck. I blew out all of the passages with aerosol carb cleaner. There were a few tiny flakes of ali on the paper covering my bench when I'd finished.

The carbs came ready jetted for the Daytona and all I had to do is fit them. I now need to pressure oil the throttle and choke cables. Just done the front brake (using 10W fork oil) and the difference is amazing - really slick now. I hope that the carb cables will be as good.

View attachment 716195

I've a Norton-type oil filter on the way too - stand by for the fitting and photos.
Hi,

This summer I acquired a fully-dismantled T100R, with 32,000 miles on the clock.

It's a UK spec and registered bike, stripped in 1982 for repair, but somehow never re-built. Some preparatory work had been done (big end journals re-ground, barrels rebored) and there were some new parts, but most showed all the signs of having been stored in the wet corner of a garage for 37 years. All of the perishables were, well, perished and a significant number of the small parts were missing. But, importantly, all of the big bits were there. Along with the rust, corrosion and cobwebs.

I bought it from a friend of the 2nd owner, who'd finally admitted that he was never going to re-build it, and he asked his friend to sell it. Effectively, I'm the 3rd owner. The friend, with BSA's, MZ's, a Panther, and much more, felt that he had at least one too many projects already.

I rode thousands of miles in the late '70s on a 68 T100T, commuting stupid distances, but when I saw the light and changed jobs, the bike had to go. A new family and a mortgage needed the money more than I needed a reliable, old friend.

Over the years I hankered after another, but a busy life and family duties meant that I had no time until, eventually, the birds had flown, I'd retired and I had the resources.

With a reasonable workshop doing nothing, I got bored, and so I bought a non-runner 1973 Tiger 750 TR7RV Canadian import and got that going as a project, never expecting to see a Daytona that would suit me. And just as I did, the T100R appeared.

A long day out in the car and the bits were all in my garage. Three and a bit months later, it was on the road on the original registration number, this time as an Historic Vehicle. I've kept as many of the original parts as I can, seeking to maintain originality. The major parts changed were exhausts, front mudguard, rims and spokes, handlebars and headlight and headlight shell, but only because they were beyond practical recovery. The only concessions I've made to modernity are Boyer ignition, and a combined regulator/rectifier.

The black parts were blasted and powder coated, the mudguards and tank professionally painted in (as far as I can ascertain) the original colours and layout for the date of manufacture (December 71). The alloy parts were vapour blasted, the carbs sonically cleaned.

Whilst I used professionals for welding repairs (oil tank and chain guard), the cleaning , powder coating and painting, and the wheel building, I researched and sourced all the parts, and screwed it all together.

All the perishables I changed - so the loom, all seals, brake linings, clutch hub, cables and any bearings where necessary. All the fasteners are new, either stainless or zinc plated. The purists will complain, but this is a rider, not an ornament with no oil in it.

I've now done 250 gentle miles on it with no issues, other than a few minor oil leaks which I've gradually eradicated. Other than a drip every few days from the sump plug, it's oil tight. Given a weep from a rocker box that is.... I've opened it up a few times and it's been lively and not too buzzy. But, I'll be keeping the revs down in the interests of maintaining the longevity of a near-50 year old machine with fully matching numbers.

The Tiger's done 1000 miles this summer, is a torquey, oily, stump-pulling animal and is this winter's project. A different bike to the Daytona, but just as much fun to ride.


1972 Triumph T100R
Thanks Andytheflyer for a great resurrection story on your T100R, amazing 'museum quality' photos. You clearly have a heap of skills to take on all that rust.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thx Paul. Appreciated! The skilled guys are really the 2 or 3 people that I found who know what they are doing. I stick to what I know that I can do well and go to those guys when I'm at the edge of my comfort zone. Not forgetting the wealth of experience available through this forum. Information is the key - if I don't know, I try to find out. If I'm still not sure, ask, or pay someone who does know to do it for me. It's cheaper in the long run!

I'm just starting the rebuild on my '73 TR7RV - that was almost as rusty! Have a look at my thread.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Decided it was time I filtered the Daytona's oil. Bought one of these - they fit in the pump return line to the tank.


Read and re-read the instructions. The cartridge filter clamps to the seat post, underneath the gearbox. Had a dry run. Looked simple enough. There's a Norton-type spin on filter head casting, a bracket and an exhaust-type U clamp to go around the seat post. Plus some pipe and Jubilee clips.

Well, it is simple enough, but I had to adapt the fitting sequence in the destructions because my hands are too big to get at the seat tube to hold the U clamp whilst fitting the filter head on its bracket. Whilst lying on my side under the bike. In the remnant dribble of oil draining from the tank.............

I fitted the bracket to the U clamp and loosely tightened it up, then fitted the filter head to the bracket, with the pipes already attached as per the instructions. Still a bit of a thrutch, but got there. With the U clamp semi-tight, I nudged it up as high as it would go - about the 90mm above the base of the seat post stated in the destructions.

The outlet hose then pressed quite hard on the hexhead of the rh footpeg bolt, so I held it off with a long cable tie around the back of the seat tube - can't see it and it does the job. Could do without wearing a hole in that oil line.

Very neat installation in the end - you don't know its there. Must give the underside of the bike a clean.

Now for the oil filter for the TR7RV - the Tiger 750........

20200115_171828.jpg
 
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