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Discussion Starter #1
hey guys i'm new to the page and new to owning a triumph so bare with me but my primary chain is missing a roller on my 1970 500cc twin triumph T100S so naturally i'm going to replace it. when changing the chain can i remove the clutch basket and sprocket with plates and everything else in one piece? or do all the clutch plates need to be removed before pulling sprocket and basket? id like to make this job as easy as possible as riding season is coming up shortly
 

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Hi,

Firstly, welcome to the Forum. :)

1970 ... T100S
primary chain is missing a roller
remove the clutch basket and sprocket with plates and everything else in one piece?
'Fraid not.

all the clutch plates need to be removed before pulling sprocket and basket?
'Fraid so - Triumph Workshop Manual free to read online (also available brand-new on paper), Sections C9 and CC9 (latter at the end of Section C).

Also, parts books free to read online; however, unfortunately, T100S is a 'UK & General Export' version, '70 was the only year Triumph produced separate US-market and UK&GE parts books and the US version is the only one online, you have to juggle between '69 and '70 books for some parts, :( although not the primary. (y) However, the UK&GE parts book is available brand-new on paper. (y)

Hth.

Regards,
 

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It will give you a chance to check the plates for wear by taking it all apart. Buy some clutch shock absorber rubbers and change them as it is out anyway. I also had a roller shatter on my T120r. It had lasted 4000 miles and was obviously an inferior brand. I now use Renolds chain and that has covered over 10,000 miles so far. Buy a quality chain and not a low cost one.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hi,

Firstly, welcome to the Forum. :)


'Fraid not.


'Fraid so - Triumph Workshop Manual free to read online (also available brand-new on paper), Sections C9 and CC9 (latter at the end of Section C).

Also, parts books free to read online; however, unfortunately, T100S is a 'UK & General Export' version, '70 was the only year Triumph produced separate US-market and UK&GE parts books and the US version is the only one online, you have to juggle between '69 and '70 books for some parts, :( although not the primary. (y) However, the UK&GE parts book is available brand-new on paper. (y)

Hth.

Regards,
Ah I see, also that helps a lot because I was having issues finding proper manuals for my bike with my vin number as it starts with “ND” and all of them seem to start with the old vin system with a single letter. I do know mine is a UK/general export from the 18’ front tire correct me if I’m wrong
 

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Discussion Starter #5
so what a quick list of things I’m gonna need for this job? Do I need special tools? A things to look for and what’s up with those little rubber things that look like roller bearings are those the clutch shock absorbers?
 

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You will need a clutch puller tool. It threads into the centre then tap it with a soft blow hammer and it breaks the taper. There will be 6 of those rubbers and i would expect them to be crumbling if over 3 years old. You might need a new thrust washer but they dont wear much so maybe just have a look at it. There are a lot of roller bearings that fall out as you take it apart, make sure they cannot escape.
When you refit those rollers, use wheel bearing grease to hold them in place during assembly.
You will need something to lock clutch plates together..There is a tool for that or make one from a plain and a friction clutch plate. lts a cheap tool so i would buy one.
You may also need to make a tool to hold the clutch centre spider as you fit the rubbers. The last two will be under a lot of pressure. Best to put the rubbers in boiling water just before you fit them.
All this seems complex but read the manual, watch some youtube videos and it is a simple task.
First attempt at this job and it might take 5 or 6 hours as you will be taking care of the work and not beating it up.
Check out lunmad video. His is a 650 but the clutch is the same.
One more tool, can be made from an old screwdriver, its for taking out and replacing the clutch spring screws. Again, it is a cheap tool to buy.
When replacing the rollers, put a roller on edge on opposite sides of the bearing track. That will hold it in place as you fit all the others. Then just turn those two into the correct position. This will save a lot of frustration of the clutch chainwheel moving and all the rollers falling out.

Lunmad video explains it all very well.. I dont think he puts the rollers in the way i do. It does show how you will need a lot of effort to compress those rubbers.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I have found some black crumbling bits in the primary case is that what it could possibly be from? I suspected gasket sealer as the previous owner had used some on the gasket, thanks for the help guys it seems like a scary job for a 22 year old but I’m sure I’ll figure it out just fine(with the help of my father who builds Harleys of course) is it recommended to disassemble the clutch before ordering all my parts just in case I find further wear?
 

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Rambo mentioned the rollers will fall out when you remove the basket. I've found placing a towel under the bike to keep the rollers from getting away works good.
 

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That looks like bits of the rubbers. Usually a black mess in the bottom of the cover. I would dismantle and have a look. If you are taking apart and then leaving it for a few days. take pictures of the order,put parts down in the layers they come off. Definitely have a parts book to view just in case you mess up the order.

If you have a Harley Dad, he will make this look easy
 

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Hi T100sRider, When rotor is removed, store it inside stator or use the curved metal "keepers" on it that come on new rotors. A rotor left out naked on bench looses magnetism. Storing in stator it will stick to stator. That's fine, doesn't have to be centered in stator.

Cold aged stator wire is very stiff & brittle. It will crack/break if bent. Warm it with heat gun or hair drier. When warmed the hard wire will become much more flexible. Try not to bend wire at all where it exits stator. That area is especially fragile.
Don
 

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Hi,
mine is a UK/general export from the 18’ front tire correct me if I’m wrong
Not just the 18" front wheel ... the T100S model code, originally a 3-British-gallon tank (it actually holds a bit more than three gallons (y)) with only one outlet, the correct tap's an odd one, with two plungers - one for main, the other for reserve - your bike was also fitted originally with a skinnier rear rim and tyre than US-market bikes.

was having issues finding proper manuals for my bike with my vin number as it starts with “ND” and all of them seem to start with the old vin system with a single letter.
By-and-large, "H65573" onwards applies to your bike (H65573 is the first '69 500, Triumph swapped to the two-letter date code VIN format about three months after the start of the '69 model year). The only major differences are:-

. Your bike's engine's crankcase vents through the primary case, the cast 'elbow' bolted to the inner face of the primary and the hose secured around the edge of the rear fender. The change first appeared on late-'69 engines but isn't shown 'til the '70 parts books.

. Your bike's frame (plus components that attach to it) is/are basically H49833 ('67 model year) onwards ... except forks and front brake are also H65573-/'69-on; rear wheel should be '70-onwards (KD27850 is the first '70 500) .

. Your bike's exact electrics were only fitted in '69 (H65573) and '70 (KD27850); the workshop manual electrics addenda (HH at the end of Section H) includes two wiring diagrams for each model year, one each labelled "UK", the other "USA". When you have to look closely at electrics, the only actual difference between the "UK" and "USA" diagrams is the connection of the lighting lever switch supply wire on the back of the ignition switch ... (y)

Nevertheless, when working on the bike, be aware of two linked things that can screw up that neat(?) categorisation ... Screw Threads And Wrench Sizes ... :devilish:

Historically, before '67, Triumph used British Standard threads and wrench sizes (that Americans call "Whitworth" :rolleyes:); '67-on, Triumph started to change to Unified/UTS threads and AF wrenches, but they didn't do all the fasteners in one go and, on the C-range, some were never changed before the last in '74.

However, as your bike is a '70, it might 🤞 not be an issue ...:-

. the 3/8"-diameter studs and bolts through the cylinder head (including four also through the rocker-boxes) are 3/8"-26 British Standard Cycle (BSC) thread, but 19/32" AF wrenches/sockets fits closely on their hexs.; (y)

. the '70 parts books say the rear wheel fasteners were changed to UNF and UNEF threads/AF wrench sizes;

. almost all other threads 1/4" diameter (7/16" AF) and larger should be UNC/UNF/UNEF with AF hexs. but, as I say, just be aware, if you do find an odd hex. size/thread, it isn't necessarily 'wrong'; always feel free to post a question on the Forum.

Otoh, threads smaller than 1/4" diameter are a mixture ...:-

. the common one is 2BA (#2 British Association) - it's very similar to both 10-32 (#10 UNF) and M5, but smaller than both, nor exactly the same pitch as either ...

. otoh, e.g. the screws that secure the 'gauze' to the front brake scoop are 4-40 (#4 UNC) and not what it says in any parts book ...

Note I've always referred to the "model year" above - that's what the "D" in your bike's VIN actually means, although neither Triumph manuals nor later books makes that absolutely clear. :rolleyes:

Then, just to mess with your head, your bike was actually built in October 1969 ... :LOL:

As vehicle-making companies still do today, Triumph started making "next year's" models part-way through the previous actual (aka "calendar") year. Reasons were: they were exported by sea, most of Triumph's output went to the US; so exports to southern hemisphere countries would arrive in their summer, it took several months to build up a stockpile in the US ready for their summer.

So although the "D" in your bike's VIN indicates the '70 "model year", because the "N" indicates October, your bike was built in "calendar" October 1969 ... :)

looks like bits of the rubbers.
+1.

When you refit those rollers, use wheel bearing grease to hold them in place during assembly.
+1, plenty of it (although I've always used just bog-standard grease).

recommended to disassemble the clutch before ordering all my parts just in case I find further wear?
Yes. You have two long-time Canadian Triumph parts suppliers - BCS (British Cycle Supply) and Walridge - and several in the US.

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Rambo were those from feked? I bought some from them that I had to throw away new as there was a clear split that would have lead to little strips breaking off like in the bottom of your picture. LPW ones were ok.
I bought those from Chris Knight who usually supplies top quality parts. I expect this to be a bad batch and they were breaking up at 2000 miles. The recent set i bought from India and the rubber looked good quality for such a low cost. There was a time these rubbers would last many years but quality is generally poor now. With this in mind, if i have the clutch apart i routinely change them now and keep a spare set in the garage. It is easy for me to do this as i do have the tools to make it easy. The last set i fitted were not so tight as previous ones. Barely needed the large lever but just the boiling water dip.
I would happily buy from Chris Knight again. Although Chris died a few years back, it is his wife that runs the business and very knowledgeable on Triumph parts. Seems to link up with Dave Degens, Dresda at the bike shows.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hi,

Not just the 18" front wheel ... the T100S model code, originally a 3-British-gallon tank (it actually holds a bit more than three gallons (y)) with only one outlet, the correct tap's an odd one, with two plungers - one for main, the other for reserve - your bike was also fitted originally with a skinnier rear rim and tyre than US-market bikes.


By-and-large, "H65573" onwards applies to your bike (H65573 is the first '69 500, Triumph swapped to the two-letter date code VIN format about three months after the start of the '69 model year). The only major differences are:-

. Your bike's engine's crankcase vents through the primary case, the cast 'elbow' bolted to the inner face of the primary and the hose secured around the edge of the rear fender. The change first appeared on late-'69 engines but isn't shown 'til the '70 parts books.

. Your bike's frame (plus components that attach to it) is/are basically H49833 ('67 model year) onwards ... except forks and front brake are also H65573-/'69-on; rear wheel should be '70-onwards (KD27850 is the first '70 500) .

. Your bike's exact electrics were only fitted in '69 (H65573) and '70 (KD27850); the workshop manual electrics addenda (HH at the end of Section H) includes two wiring diagrams for each model year, one each labelled "UK", the other "USA". When you have to look closely at electrics, the only actual difference between the "UK" and "USA" diagrams is the connection of the lighting lever switch supply wire on the back of the ignition switch ... (y)

Nevertheless, when working on the bike, be aware of two linked things that can screw up that neat(?) categorisation ... Screw Threads And Wrench Sizes ... :devilish:

Historically, before '67, Triumph used British Standard threads and wrench sizes (that Americans call "Whitworth" :rolleyes:); '67-on, Triumph started to change to Unified/UTS threads and AF wrenches, but they didn't do all the fasteners in one go and, on the C-range, some were never changed before the last in '74.

However, as your bike is a '70, it might 🤞 not be an issue ...:-

. the 3/8"-diameter studs and bolts through the cylinder head (including four also through the rocker-boxes) are 3/8"-26 British Standard Cycle (BSC) thread, but 19/32" AF wrenches/sockets fits closely on their hexs.; (y)

. the '70 parts books say the rear wheel fasteners were changed to UNF and UNEF threads/AF wrench sizes;

. almost all other threads 1/4" diameter (7/16" AF) and larger should be UNC/UNF/UNEF with AF hexs. but, as I say, just be aware, if you do find an odd hex. size/thread, it isn't necessarily 'wrong'; always feel free to post a question on the Forum.

Otoh, threads smaller than 1/4" diameter are a mixture ...:-

. the common one is 2BA (#2 British Association) - it's very similar to both 10-32 (#10 UNF) and M5, but smaller than both, nor exactly the same pitch as either ...

. otoh, e.g. the screws that secure the 'gauze' to the front brake scoop are 4-40 (#4 UNC) and not what it says in any parts book ...

Note I've always referred to the "model year" above - that's what the "D" in your bike's VIN actually means, although neither Triumph manuals nor later books makes that absolutely clear. :rolleyes:

Then, just to mess with your head, your bike was actually built in October 1969 ... :LOL:

As vehicle-making companies still do today, Triumph started making "next year's" models part-way through the previous actual (aka "calendar") year. Reasons were: they were exported by sea, most of Triumph's output went to the US; so exports to southern hemisphere countries would arrive in their summer, it took several months to build up a stockpile in the US ready for their summer.

So although the "D" in your bike's VIN indicates the '70 "model year", because the "N" indicates October, your bike was built in "calendar" October 1969 ... :)



+1.


+1, plenty of it (although I've always used just bog-standard grease).


Yes. You have two long-time Canadian Triumph parts suppliers - BCS (British Cycle Supply) and Walridge - and several in the US.

Hth.

Regards,
Amazing thank you so much! And I deal with Walridge they’re very helpful! And I decoded my vin and had found out that it was made in oct,69 so I had suspicions that it would affect finding a proper manual. Being a 1970 and kinda being a hodgepodge of years does that make it anymore desirable? And please IS IT A TIGER OR TROPHY bc I hear different and have read different things
 

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Hi T100sRider, Problems solved! I’d expect the hub is junk also. Most likely the spider & back plate of cush hub will be worn also. So you’ll need everything. I stand by the 7 plate kit. Obviously you’ll need 6 steel plates as well.

On the plus side you clutch really will work like new.
Don
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Hi T100sRider, Problems solved! I’d expect the hub is junk also. Most likely the spider & back plate of cush hub will be worn also. So you’ll need everything. I stand by the 7 plate kit. Obviously you’ll need 6 steel plates as well.

On the plus side you clutch really will work like new.
Don
7 plate kit? If it only takes 6 of each? Sorry just run me through lol and do they sell complete clutch kits (plates and all?) if so if anyone has any good links
 
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