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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys! So my head gasket seems to be leaking by seems to be I mean pissing down the side of my jug on to my primary cover (which I had just buffed and polished after replacing my clutch) i got the bike last august and pulled the engine to paint it and check things over and got it back together and stupid me never checked my head torque duh so when I fired it up for the first time I was horrified by what I saw so I checked my manual for the torque specs and went to torque the heads and WOW maybe 10ft pounds on each bolt so I figured awesome I’m in the clear but to my surprise... still leaking but not even close to what it was before then did some more digging and once again duh never realized that their was head bolts in/on the rockers, now when I see videos on the 650s they have Allen keys inside the rockers but in my parts book it doesn’t seem show that for the 500s (or I’m blind) so are the inner bolts on the outside of my rockers for my heads? or do I have to remove the rockers to access the true head bolts? Im assuming if my outer head bolts were waaaay out of torque my inners will be as well so hopefully that will fix my problem, not looking to do to much more engine work as RIDING SEASON IS AMONG US
 

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Hi,
head gasket seems to be leaking
pissing down the side of my jug on to my primary cover
Uh-uh. Head gasket seals between the cylinder head and the cylinder block, oil doesn't pass through it. What's more likely to be leaking is one or both rocker-box gaskets - between the rocker-boxes (above the cylinder head) and the head and/or the pushrod tube seals - pushrod tubes are the vertical chromed tubes

head torque
checked my manual for the torque specs
maybe 10ft pounds on each bolt
head bolts in/on the rockers,
do I have to remove the rockers to access the true head bolts?
No, but you do need to be very careful which torque you apply to which fasteners around the cylinder head.

Assuming you have the correct 99-0902 parts book, page 18, "CYLINDER BLOCK AND HEAD, T100S":-

.. Four part 20 (one either side of each spark plug with a tall hex. poking through the cylinder head fins);

.. two part 31 and two part 32 (all close to the centre of the two rocker-boxes (part 32 have extensions for links - head-steadies - to the frame));

... all take a socket marked either "3/8 BS" (3/8" British Standard) or 19/32" AF, torqued to 18 ft.lb. (not 25 ft.lb. in the manual); these must also be torqued in the order shown in the workshop manual, not any old random order.

. Four part 29 screws - (two in each rocker-box, could be slotted, Pozidrive or socket cap (Allen) screws) 6 ft.lb., which is not very tight if you don't have a torque wrench that goes that low.

videos on the 650s they have Allen keys inside the rockers but in my parts book it doesn’t seem show that for the 500s
Correct. Look again at your parts book - parts 26, 27, 28 are a stud, washer and nut respectively; studs poke down through holes in the cylinder head, secured by a nut; one above each branch of the inlet manifold, one above each exhaust pipe.

if my outer head bolts were waaaay out of torque my inners will be as well
Possibly; nevertheless, as I've written above, the 3/8" bolts and studs must also be torqued in the order illustrated in the workshop manual.

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I know that the head gasket seals between the cylinder head and I know what rocker boxes are etc and the oil is oddly coming from where the head meets the cylinder then down all the way to the primary I did tighten them in sequence but not sure as why they would put 25foot lbs if it needs to be 18 , i read that they usually don’t leak (I’ve worked on a few vintage harleys and they will leak out of the head gasket as me and my father JUST changed a leaky head gasket on a old sportster) and I know what the push rods are as harleys have them but triumph has them in the front and back instead of the sides and like many things I’ve realized that I can’t compare my Harley knowledge to my triumph knowledge I understand the workings of a motorcycle as I’ve been a grease monkey in my dads garage building vintage bikes since I was 6-7 just don’t have the best knowledge on triumphs, my push rod on the front does leak but not compared to the amount that I’m watch pour down we tried to trace the oil and no matter what it seems to be coming from where the head splits so now COULD their be something cause the bike to push oil out of it? Ex crappy rings, oil in cylinders but I’m praying it’s my rockers or push rods
 

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Hi,
been a grease monkey in my dads garage
since I was 6-7
OK, wasn't clear from your first post.

why they would put 25foot lbs if it needs to be 18
Mistakes get made.

COULD their be something cause the bike to push oil out of it? Ex crappy rings, oil in cylinders
the oil is oddly coming from where the head meets the cylinder
my push rod on the front does leak but not compared to the amount that I’m watch pour down
You're looking at the amount of oil; if that amount was in one of the cylinders, wouldn't it be causing other problems - fouled plug, etc.?

When Edward Turner was designing his original Speed Twin in the mid-1930's, he designed the separate pushrod tubes (the pushrods themselves are inside the tubes) to save weight; and he also used them to drain oil from the rocker-boxes back to the crankcase; every Triumph after 'til Hinckley used the same design. Moreover, Meriden had one of its periodic goes at 'improving' the PRT sealing for the '69 year, replacing the previous thick seals with thin O-rings ... but then unfortunately finding they couldn't make the parts accurately enough for the thin O-rings to seal consistently on every engine ... 😖

Wherever you think the oil's coming from, you'll need to remove rocker-boxes to check their gaskets to the head; for that, the head bolts/studs are out, so you might as well take off the head and redo the PRT seals anyway? :)

Things You Need To Know:-

. If you're using the correct 99-0902 parts book for your bike, the PRT O-rings part number is listed as E7310; this was updated to E11283 (71-1283). If you're using the US-market parts book, E11283 is shown for the PRT top O-rings, use the updated part number for both top and bottom O-rings. The part number difference is only material, E11283 is Viton so more oil- and heat-resistant than E7310.

. If your bike has what appears to be a separate steel ring over the bottom of each pushrod tube, it's likely your bike has well-known parts not shown 'til later parts books but fitted as part of a Service upgrade to fix the aforementioned "unfortunately finding they couldn't make the parts accurately enough to seal with O-rings consistently on every engine" ... :rolleyes:

. If your bike has the separate steel rings, when ordering parts, add at least two each of 70-4752 and 70-3547 - when you lift the PRT and the steel rings, you'll see the old ones, you just won't know what's been fitted; if you have both (the two part numbers are just different thicknesses), no waiting around for new to arrive. (y)

. If your bike doesn't have a copper head gasket, consider? Because it's then reusable. (y)

. Similarly, copper rocker-box-to-head gaskets are available; however, be prepared to put extra work into ensuring the rocker-box and head mating surfaces are flat. An alternative gasket that works well is CovSeal (Walridge probably has them/ will know about them). Standard rocker-box-to-head gaskets only as a last resort imho.

. If you find the head's cylinder block mating surface isn't flat, skim it only if it's irregular; if it's bent (over the PRT?), straighten it - not as difficult as it sounds, the head casting bends relatively easily. :(

Hth.

Regards,
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi,

OK, wasn't clear from your first post.


Mistakes get made.


You're looking at the amount of oil; if that amount was in one of the cylinders, wouldn't it be causing other problems - fouled plug, etc.?

When Edward Turner was designing his original Speed Twin in the mid-1930's, he designed the separate pushrod tubes (the pushrods themselves are inside the tubes) to save weight; and he also used them to drain oil from the rocker-boxes back to the crankcase; every Triumph after 'til Hinckley used the same design. Moreover, Meriden had one of its periodic goes at 'improving' the PRT sealing for the '69 year, replacing the previous thick seals with thin O-rings ... but then unfortunately finding they couldn't make the parts accurately enough for the thin O-rings to seal consistently on every engine ... 😖

Wherever you think the oil's coming from, you'll need to remove rocker-boxes to check their gaskets to the head; for that, the head bolts/studs are out, so you might as well take off the head and redo the PRT seals anyway? :)

Things You Need To Know:-

. If you're using the correct 99-0902 parts book for your bike, the PRT O-rings part number is listed as E7310; this was updated to E11283 (71-1283). If you're using the US-market parts book, E11283 is shown for the PRT top O-rings, use the updated part number for both top and bottom O-rings. The part number difference is only material, E11283 is Viton so more oil- and heat-resistant than E7310.

. If your bike has what appears to be a separate steel ring over the bottom of each pushrod tube, it's likely your bike has well-known parts not shown 'til later parts books but fitted as part of a Service upgrade to fix the aforementioned "unfortunately finding they couldn't make the parts accurately enough to seal with O-rings consistently on every engine" ... :rolleyes:

. If your bike has the separate steel rings, when ordering parts, add at least two each of 70-4752 and 70-3547 - when you lift the PRT and the steel rings, you'll see the old ones, you just won't know what's been fitted; if you have both (the two part numbers are just different thicknesses), no waiting around for new to arrive. (y)

. If your bike doesn't have a copper head gasket, consider? Because it's then reusable. (y)

. Similarly, copper rocker-box-to-head gaskets are available; however, be prepared to put extra work into ensuring the rocker-box and head mating surfaces are flat. An alternative gasket that works well is CovSeal (Walridge probably has them/ will know about them). Standard rocker-box-to-head gaskets only as a last resort imho.

. If you find the head's cylinder block mating surface isn't flat, skim it only if it's irregular; if it's bent (over the PRT?), straighten it - not as difficult as it sounds, the head casting bends relatively easily. :(

Hth.

Regards,
amazing thanks so much!!! Appreciate the help, safe riding
 
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