Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

61 - 79 of 79 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,301 Posts
This front end looks like mine T150V front end - if it is I hope you didn't use original springs with blob of red paint on one end - they are much to stiff for Trident, wouldn't work at all for a twin.
Front brake will work well with Platinum Ferodo HH pads and 11 mm front master, front light is good with H4 Lucas / Wassell reflector + bulb ( 55 / 45W? or stronger ) and 3 phase alternator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
Hi Andy,


Check them for the small stress-relief radius between the 3/8" OD that fits through the Metalastik and the wider handlebar clamp itself. Some pattern clamps don't have the radius. :cool:

Hth.

Regards,
Thx Stuart. I'll get them from somewhere reputable, LP Williams probably if they have them, and check that radius. Given their condition, mine must be original so I'll be able to compare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #65 (Edited)
That looks rather familiar, and rather nice too! My Tiger 750 has a 71 T120R OIF frame - the front end is identical. Awaiting further progress with great interest.

My 750 will come to bits shortly for a cosmetic restoration - all the black bits will be powder coated, and the engine apart for some Helicoils and a general furtle to see what condition it's in. Oh, and fix the oil leaks. It's a bike repatriated from Toronto last winter.

I think I'll get some new P clamps when I rebuild to see if that helps with the handlebar skew.
Thanks Andy - yeah it's a 1968 TR6 frame, but a previous owner (the one before the previous one) has grafted on a set of later forks from an OIF triple, with disc brake. This is how the bike came to me, and given it's not a matching numbers bike, and doesn't have original paint etc, I have opted not to return it back to standard, but to recommission the bike as is. Had it been a matching numbers bike and otherwise fairly original, I'd have sourced and fitted a correct set of forks and drum brake, as the 'finished' value would have reflected the additional money and time. As it stands though, the decision to restore it as a rider was an easy one, and gives me a bit more flexibility on the approach. My goal is a reliable, presentable runner to enjoy, and use on nice days, and to tinker with.

I'm trying to balance keeping the costs to a minimum with a presentable level of cosmetic appearance, and also a decent standard of safety and reliability. Hence I made the decision to replace all fasteners with new for example, but save cost by re-using parts such as the fork legs, various brackets, swinging arm, stands etc. I've carefully taken all these bits back to clean metal, as I did the frame, and painted and lacquered myself.

Once I've got new rear shocks and the refurbed swingarm fitted in the next few weeks, I'm going to clear the decks, and start on the engine. As far as I can tell from selecting gears with the engine still in the frame, the gearbox is OK, and I am hoping the bottom end will need nothing more than a thorough clean-up (including the sludge trap), and new bearings. I do know it's only done 200 miles since it was last rebuilt, but that was sometime around 1981! It turns smoothly and freely, and there's no perceptible play on the big ends, although clearances will of course be properly checked when it comes apart.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
This is how the bike came to me, and given it's not a matching numbers bike, and doesn't have original paint etc, I have opted not to return it back to standard, but to recommission the bike as is. Had it been a matching numbers bike .................My goal is a reliable, presentable runner to enjoy, and use on nice days, and to tinker with.

I'm trying to balance keeping the costs to a minimum with a presentable level of cosmetic appearance, and also a decent standard of safety and reliability. Hence I made the decision to replace all fasteners with new for example.....................
Ah ha! We are ad idem on that philosophy. My dilemma is just how far do you go? We don't have matching numbers, so the ultimate value is limited, but do I replace the slightly battered (but otherwise perfectly acceptable) headlight shell? Do I replace the scruffy plastic side panels or can I refurbish and make them look good enough? Choices, choices for a dark, wet, winter's night's contemplation over an Islay malt! Keep us posted on your decision-making?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #67 (Edited)
Sorry all for the lack of updates. Been a hectic time both in and out of work, and the project hasn’t moved forward as quickly as expected.

I’ve taken a chance on a set of used barrels on eBay for £100 delivered. They are on standard bore (mine were 60 thou over) and came with a set of standard pistons. All fins and threads are good, and they are the same exhaust tappet oil feed type. I’m going to take these to a local machine shop who will check the condition, measure, rebore if necessary (plenty of meat to play with now) and supply a set of pistons to match. But I’m holding off until I get the rest of the engine apart in case the crank needs attention also.

As implied above, with the frame done, my next step is the engine. I’ve knocked together a stand out of a section of old hifi rack, welding on a lug to hold the engine upright via the front mounts. It’s not pretty, but it’s holding the engine level and making the initial strip down easier.

I already had the barrels and pistons off before I started, so it was straight on to the bottom end. So far I have:

- Removed both the primary and timing covers. There was quite a mix of Allen head and screw head bolts, and some of the latter were rough as toast, but gentle perseverance got them all out with no damage

- Removed the alternator stator and rotor, the clutch plates (and the primary chain, clutch hub and crank sprocket

- Removed the primary chain adjusting shoe and the drive sprocket cover plate. Two of the screws in the latter were a complete ball ache to get out, and I had to resort to an impact driver for the last one, but they did come out.

Drive chain sprocket is still there. I don’t have anything that will fit the nut, but a mate is coming to my rescue with this, and a couple of other bits in the next week.

I’ve yet to start on the timing side beyond removing the cover. I have the correct puller for the cam gears (mine have the two threaded holes rather than the central thread for the puller) which came with the little widget to protect the AAU mounting in the exhaust cam, but a mate of mine is digging through his shed to find me a spare crank pinion to lock the gears, and crank pinion puller. He’s also got the aforementioned spanner for the drive chain sprocket as well.

The gearbox oil was clean and there was plenty of it. Given the gears all selected OK, I’m optimistic there won’t be any horror stories in here. The engine oil is filthy treacle so I’m a bit more pessimistic. But it will all be revealed once I get the cases apart. The engine does turn freely, but I’ve been trying not to move it given the state of things, and potentially making any issues worse.

The good news is that every fastener and component I’ve removed so far has come out or off without damage. I’ve only had two that have caused me any real issue, but patience and care overcame them in the end. That being said, I did have to shave the resin around two of the stator mounting nuts slightly in order to be able to get a socket square on them. I scraped gently with a sharp knife until I could get the socket in, but as the stator will be upgraded anyway, I’m not too worried.

So, that’s where we are. A few pics attached. The cam sprocket puller shot was just where I test fitted it to make sure I wasn't going to have any issues when I came to do the job. Fits like a glove. It also made light work of pulling the primary sprocket off the end of the crank, once I found some bolts to fit. :)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #69
That engine is one of the cleanest pre-overhaul that I've seen!
The shame of it (although possibly an advantage for me) is that it was rebuilt about 200 miles before it was laid up. What won’t have done it any good at all though is the barrels were taken off about 10 years ago and the bottom end exposed to the elements. The bike was covered, but left outside. :(

Until I get it apart I can’t tell, but I can see rust on the cam lobes and there’s a load of crud in the bottom of the case. The gearbox oil looked like it had just come out of the bottle though when I drained it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #70
The puller and the sprocket tool are coming tomorrow so engine work has ceased for now.
Spoke to a very helpful chap called Warren at Central Wheels in Birmingham who gave me loads of useful advice and who I’ve decided to entrust with the wheels. Sent lots of photos and they are happy they can refurb the hubs, so busied myself with cutting them out and stripping them ready to send off in January once the Christmas chaos is out of the way.
Out of the raft of options, I’m opting for stainless rims and spokes with nickel plated brass nipples. They will also supply and fit new rim tapes, tubes and a pair of Dunlop TT100 tyres. It’s a lot of money, but given the amount of work and skill involved, and the end result, I think it’s fair.
Got the rear hub dismantled and cleaned. It’s not in bad shape at all. One bearing is rough, the other feels good, but will change them both as a precaution.
A few more pics. Merry Christmas everyone.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #71
Got the crank case halves split. It was remarkably uneventful All the bolts came out without too much trouble, and the case halves started to separate as soon as the last bolt came out. A bit of jiggling, and a couple of taps with a rubber mallet, and the drive side case was free.

The crank is well and truly stuck in the timing side case and bearing. I tried a few hopeful taps with the rubber mallet on the end of the crank, but it didn’t budge. This seems to be quite common, and I’ll be working through the various suggestions on the forum to free it.

Loads of sludge and crud in the bottom of the cases, but apart from rusty cams, there’s nothing that alarms me so far. I’ll strip everything out of the cases, get them vapour blasted, and reassemble with new bearings throughout.

Transmission is all in good order visually. There are some marks on the bottom of the case which look like gears have grazed the case at some point, but there’s no damage on the teeth and all the transmission bearings feel nice and smooth, so my theory at the moment is that it’s an old problem that has been corrected. Being a 72 engine, it has the dreaded leaf spring instead of the plunger, but I’m not going down the road of converting it. It will be going back together with the leaf spring.
715473
715474
715475
715476
715477
715478
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
200 Posts
The crank is well and truly stuck in the timing side case and bearing. I tried a few hopeful taps with the rubber mallet on the end of the crank, but it didn’t budge. This seems to be quite common, and I’ll be working through the various suggestions on the forum to free it.
I've just re-assembled the bottom end of my 73 TR7RV - see my thread on this forum. Like you, when I stripped it the t/s main is tight on the crank (as it should be) and I chickened out and since my cases were going to the restorer's for vapour blasting I left that little job to them.

They gave me back the crank and cases dis-assembled. On offering up the t/s crank journal to that t/s main bearing, it won't fit. I heated the bearing up for about 10 minutes with a hot air gun on hot and the crank dropped right in with no persuasion necessary.

Try a bit of heat - IIRC from A level physics many years ago, the hole expands with heat, so that may free it enough to be able to tap it out. Or leave it to the vapour blasters!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Postie...
Really sorry to bounce pass, but this might be a good time since it looks like it's available. Is there any chance you can please measure in inches the OD of the main gear drive shaft. Just the end that the kickstarter ratchet slides onto...the section in the lines I drew on this picture.
Thanks!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Thanks Bro'...
Mine is the same, but won't fit into the new bearing I bought from Feked. com and the kickstarter ratchet won't slid on either!
The washer, pinion sleeve, pinion spring and the kickstarter pinion all fit, but not the kickstarter ratchet!
Damn bike-o-parts!

Sorry man not trying to veer this tread off the rails...so I'm going to start another thread for this one.
Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #76
I've just re-assembled the bottom end of my 73 TR7RV - see my thread on this forum. Like you, when I stripped it the t/s main is tight on the crank (as it should be) and I chickened out and since my cases were going to the restorer's for vapour blasting I left that little job to them.

They gave me back the crank and cases dis-assembled. On offering up the t/s crank journal to that t/s main bearing, it won't fit. I heated the bearing up for about 10 minutes with a hot air gun on hot and the crank dropped right in with no persuasion necessary.

Try a bit of heat - IIRC from A level physics many years ago, the hole expands with heat, so that may free it enough to be able to tap it out. Or leave it to the vapour blasters!
Cheers Andy. Been following your thread. Looks like a great project and you’re making good progress with it. :)

Managed to free the crank by picking it up by the crank itself, holding it with the case facing down over a bundle of rags on the bench, then tapping the case sharply “downwards” with a rubber mallet a couple of times. The case and crank parted company after two taps. I then got the inner race off the crank with a normal puller.

There is a YouTube vid of a chap getting the outer race out of the cover by putting the case half on his bbq for 20 mins and then tapping the case on a block of wood where the race just fell out of the case. I’m going to try that tomorrow, albeit I’ll use the oven where the heat is a bit more controllable.

I’ve got a decent set of bearing drivers and a mapgas torch so will be driving the remaining bearings out of the cases and the gearbox inner cover tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Postie,
Okay - last bounce pass away...(hopefully!)
What is the inside diameter of the main gear shaft bearing in your inner gearbox cover? The bearing that the .75" main shaft slides through.
Thanks again!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Postie,
Okay - last bounce pass away...(hopefully!)
What is the inside diameter of the main gear shaft bearing in your inner gearbox cover? The bearing that the .75" main shaft slides through.
Thanks again!
Disregard my last... Figured it out!
 
61 - 79 of 79 Posts
Top