Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

21 - 40 of 79 Posts

Registered
Joined
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #21
Cheers Rod, will do. I can actually see where the little lug has been cut out of what's left of the tube at the rear most part. So I can only presume it's been run without torque stays as well. I am confident I can fabricate something suitable as I'm putting new metal in anyway.

This project gets more and more interesting... I got the rest of the engine back from my dad's place today. The head has 71-2863 HOA stamped into it, which a quick Google suggests is from an early T140 Bonneville.

So what I seem to have is a 68 TR6 frame, with the bottom half of the engine from an OIF TR6, and a top half from a T140 (to go with the T140 forks and front brake).

A true Trigger's Broom in other words. 馃檪
 

Registered
Joined
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #23
Ok, so I've refitted the engine loose to the frame, and put the barrels, head and rocker boxes on.

I think I've worked out why the brace tube was hacked. Mocking up the tube with a bit of rolled up cardboard, there isnt enough space to get the rocker boxes off the studs without the torque stay bolt clumping the tube. With the gap as it is now, the rocker box can be tilted reward and withdrawn.

With the info I have to hand, the most logical assumption is that the later engine and head combo is marginally taller, and this "modification" was made to allow the engine to fit.

In better news, the front stay does finish up in the general direction of the lug between the two frame tubes. I can shape and drill a piece of metal plate so that it lines up with an existing hole, and then bolt it up perhaps with a small spacer. I will reinstate the rear stay lug in the frame where it should be, then again make up a plate that connects it to the bolt on the rear rocker box cover.

My question at the moment is what is the best way around this tube issue. Given theres only a few mill needed, I wonder if a small relief in the new tube section directly above the torque stay stud on the front rocker box might be the best way forward.

Going to have a ponder, but any advice or suggestions welcome.

Cheers
Dan
 

Attachments

Registered
Joined
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
After a lot of trial, adjustment, shaving and retrial, I got the new tube section welded roughly in place. Need to tidy the welds up at the back, but I'm pleased with the fit, and the apparent integrity of the welds.

After a lot of trial welds using spare offcuts of tube, I opted to chamfer the edges of both mating faces, and run my 135A Clarke MIG on its lowest power setting. This seemed to give adequate penetration on the test tubing without risking blowing holes in the old metal, sound as it looked. My calipers measured the existing tube at a whisker over 2mm, so I selected 1", 2.03mm (14 swg) tube. It mated up and welded nicely.

As well as tidying the welds, I have left (and slightly enlarged/tidied) the hole where the old heady steady lug was. I will cut a section of tube to fit the hole, and weld a short piece of 3mm bar on to it to provide a mounting lug for the head steady. I will then weld this into the old tube, and butt up to the end of the new section. Should be more than strong enough.

Already looks better without that jagged gap though.
 

Attachments

Registered
Joined
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #27
Rear frame has been carefully prepped and had its first coat of gloss black.

I'm quite pleased at how it has come up (so far) for a rattle can job. I'm much more comfortable with mechanical and electrical work than cosmetics 馃槈

Next step is to flatten it off, carefully clean it again, and add another coat. Once I'm happy with the finish, it will get a coat or two of clear lacquer for protection. I'll get the tank, oil tank and side panels painted professionally, but was happy to tackle the frame myself.

The only "before" photo I have is when it was still fitted to the bike, but attached for comparison. 馃檪

The main frame is probably about 2/3 prepped. The paint removal discs I am using make light work of the old paint, but the nooks and crannies are very slow to do. Alternating between that and painting the other bits to alleviate the prep tedium.

I have ordered new UNF nuts and bolts, plus washers, all of the correct size and grade to put the frame back together.

I am determined this poor old girl will look pretty again.
 

Attachments

Registered
Joined
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #28
Rear frame has come up really nicely.

Two coats of primer. First coat flatted back with 600 grit, second with 1000 grit.
Two coats of black, each flatted back with 1000 grit
Two coats of clear lacquer. Currently drying.

Considering this is an unqualified idiot with rattlecans, I am very happy with this. Now to replicate the finish on the main frame. Unfortunately, the latter is taking an age to prep due to the various nooks and crannies, but I needed to see this bit done to keep me motivated.

I'm looking forward to the mechanical and electrical stuff much more than paint, but if this part isn't right, the whole base of the project isn't either, so I am forcing myself not to rush this part.

The nuts, bolts and washers to put the frame back together (plus a load of spare UNF nuts and washers) arrived today from Namrick, so I'm hoping to have the frame all finished and back together sometime next week. The exception is the top stud which they don't do, so that's coming from a different supplier hopefully tomorrow. I had ordered a 4" x 3/8 UNF bolt to use instead, but had a last minute change of heart and bought the correct stud.

Also starting to form an idea of what order I'll do the rebuild in. The bike needs almost everything, so it's all going to happen at some point anyway ;)

I think I'm going to start at the front end, so first on the shopping list will be the fork stanchions and seals, gaiters, springs, head bearings, handlebars, brake master cylinder, levers and a new headlamp shell (old one is too rusty and pitted to save). The brake caliper pistons both pushed back in relatively easily with grips and a piece of wood, so I'm hoping when I get around to taking the caliper apart, a seal kit and a thorough clean will sort that out. I'll buy a nice shiny new cover and decal for it for the pennies (relatively) they cost.

From there, clean, repaint and refit the swingarm, fit a new pair of rear shocks (Hagons probably, as I've fitted those on various Jap bikes and they have all been great). Most of the swingarm hardware (adjusters, dust shields etc) will clean up and be re-used. I'm happy with the swingarm bushes, so it's going to be mostly clean/degrease, paint and refit as far as that goes. At that point, she should start to vaguely resemble a motorcycle again.

The wheels are going to cost an absolute fortune, plus a kings ransom on top if the hubs can't be saved, so those are currently sitting forlorn in a corner until I have the courage and potential war-chest to deal with them.

Other project decisions/thoughts/random ramblings since my last update

I'm going to wire the bike, from scratch myself rather than buy an off-the-shelf loom. I intend to fit indicators (this will be a rider), electronic ignition and a modern voltage regulator (although refit the Zener heatsink purely for aesthetics), so there will be so much modding of, and adding to a standard loom that it seems pointless. I intend to add separate circuits and fuses for ignition and accessories as well. Apart from safety, it also makes diagnosing wiring issues easier, and it also means a fault on an accessory or its wiring doesn't disable the entire bike. The ammeter still works (!) and cleaned up nicely, so I'll refit it. The rev counter also works (tested with the cable and a drill), but the speedo doesn't. It's damaged internally and the face sits at a jaunty angle inside the case.

Currently considering the benefits of positive earth vs switching to negative earth - one of the joys of starting from scratch is there's a free choice. Every vehicle I've owned and worked on has been negative earth, so it somehow feels more natural to me, but will continue to mull it over. I intend to configure my new loom to run the earth (whichever side) of as many components as I can directly back to the battery rather than use the frame. Particularly as I've painted it, which will now make that job even harder.

That's about it. Very much enjoying myself so far, haven't (yet) triggered the other half's time or money annoyance threshold, and really forming a bond with this poor old girl. More to follow as I go.

Thank you everyone for all the help and advice so far. It is greatly appreciated.
 

Attachments

Moderator
Joined
6,494 Posts
Hi Dan,

Considering this is an unqualified idiot with rattlecans, I am very happy with this.
So you should be, looks PDG in your pictures.

One thing to be aware of is, when you start to tighten nuts and bolts, even if you put a washer under the nut/bolt, the washer'll still rotate and gouge a circular mark in the paint; they do even in powder-coating. One way I reduced the gouging considerably was to use two thin (generally 1 mm. thick) washers back-to-back.

rev counter also works
but the speedo doesn't. It's damaged internally and the face sits at a jaunty angle inside the case.
Ashley Pople for repairs (the rev. counter could probably also do with a service?) or a pair of the 'sixty-quid pattern' ones?

ammeter still works
If you wire it in, connect a short length of wire between its terminals. It'll then only indicate half what's actually either being drawn from or charging the battery but, when (note not "if" :bluduh) vibration does disintegrate the Ammeter, it won't stop the bike ... unless a loose part falls somewhere to make a short-circuit and blow the main fuse ... Note also that, on a Brit twin, vibration does ... errr ... affect ... "indicate" ...

I'm going to wire the bike, from scratch myself rather than buy an off-the-shelf loom. I intend to fit indicators (this will be a rider), electronic ignition and a modern voltage regulator (although refit the Zener heatsink purely for aesthetics), so there will be so much modding of, and adding to a standard loom that it seems pointless.
:agree Not only that; at best, one loom maker says they doesn't make any changes from standard (hmmm ...); the other - Wassell "Genuine Lucas" :rofl - make usually-retrograde changes to suit themselves ...

Your list in order ...

Indicators - This has some wrinkles ... this is what I did on my ('69) T100:-

. Used '71-on dry-frame fork shrouds (oif 73-on are shorter) and headlamp brackets - because the latter are flat (unlike pre-'71 headlamp brackets) and have strengthened holes specifically for indicators.

. Used a '70/'73-'75 'dry frame' grab rail - these have the 'hoop' behind the seat and rear indicator mounting holes in the triangular gussets between the two 'hoops'. Note: you can't use an oif grabrail as the "'hoop' behind the seat" is further forward; '71/'72 have smaller holes in the gussets, to mount reflectors.

. Didn't fancy standard Lucas indicators so I bought something smaller and less-obtrusive from M&P. Mine have 10mm. OD stems; the mounting holes in the headlamp brackets and grabrail are 7/16" ID for Lucas indicators so I filled the gaps with off-the-shelf O-rings for a bit of extra vibe protection. Also, the M&P indicators had supply and return wires as standard, :thumb Risking telling you something you know already, if you pick LED indicators, you need a LED-specific relay.

. Replaced the standard horn-'n'-dipswitch with the cluster used first on the T160, later on the '76-'78 twins - adds indicators switch and headlamp flash to the horn and dipswitch functions. The Sparx pattern is more-easily available than original Lucas but the quality of much recent Sparx stuff isn't great. :( Hinckley used a not-dissimilar-looking cluster pre-'04 and there's a US company that also makes one, albeit they're both in black with some brightly-coloured levers and buttons. Hinckley also used a compact kill (and electric-start) switch on the right 'bar. I can supply more details of the Hinckley and other cluster if required.

Modern voltage regulator - I recommend either A-Reg3, Podtronics 3-phase or https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12V-Motorcycle-Voltage-Regulator-Rectifier-For-Honda-PC31-CBR600-CBR900RR-Hot/352693724924?hash=item521e2f26fc:g:7d0AAOSw4DJdBwME (plus https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/High-Performance-Motorcycle-Voltage-Regulator-Solid-Rectifier-for-Honda-CBR-SD/173936133350?hash=item287f66c4e6:g:kU4AAOSwaOpbmiiB). The first two both have great customer backup, the Ebay one is so cheap you can buy two ... but they have proved very reliable. :thumb 3-phase reg./rec. because: you can connect the bike's existing single-phase alternator to one; when you come to upgrade the alternator, 3-phase is the 'most bang for your buck' so not a lot of point also paying to upgrade a relatively-new single-phase reg./rec.

Aside, your bike's original alternator stator was/is 3-wire but single-phase; also, it's relatively feeble by modern standards - ~8.5 Amps/100 Watts @ 5,000 rpm, assuming original 51-year-old rotor magnetism is still good ...

considering the benefits of positive earth vs switching to negative earth
You know it doesn't change how the electrics actually work? I swap between the two 'systems' without any problems, bearing in mind 'earth' in DC is just jargon, so I never think of it.

I intend to configure my new loom to run the earth (whichever side) of as many components as I can directly back to the battery rather than use the frame.
:agree Fwiw, 'original Lucas' tried (and pretty-much succeeded) to wire both conductors of all circuits, avoiding as far as possible using sundry bits of bike, unless a given electrical component 'earthed' through its mounting, when a wire was connected as close as possible.

I rewired my first Triumph - one of my T160's - over the '82/'83 winter, followed the Lucas system and the electrics have been totally reliable; subsequently, I've also made the electrics of several old Jap bikes more reliable using the same principles ... The system I use was/is a simplification of what I found in the T160's original loom; I've used it ever since on every bike I've rewired:-

. Two '8-way' (four wires in each end) standard bullet snap connectors, one in the headlamp shell, one in the area under the seat;

. individual components connected to the nearest '8-way', including the battery 'earth terminal' to the under-seat 8-way;

. the two 8-ways connected together by two lengths of thicker wire, those two lengths joined:-

.. either at a ring terminal attached to an engine component (e.g. one of the head-steady bolts);

.. or at a '4-way' (two wires in each end) standard bullet snap connector above said engine component, with another wire from the 4-way to the engine component.

I intend to add separate circuits and fuses for ignition and accessories as well.
Again bear in mind, while your bike didn't have a separate "accessories" circuit, as standard it had separate circuits for ignition, headlamp, other lamps and horn. However, unless you're a habitual Idiot's Lantern user, you might find an actual "accessories circuit" is unnecessary - with standard 'original Lucas' colour codes easily-available, unswitched, switched-by-ignition, switched-by-lights and common supply or return wiring are easily-identifiable for connecting additional gadgets.

Fuses - is advising blade fuses stating the obvious? :)

The practical problem I've encountered with separate fuses for different circuits is - as both the switches that separate the circuits and the items they switch are mostly at the front of the bike - where to mount the fuse box/group the fuse holders without running lots of wires up and down the bike? Year or so ago, guy who posts on Britbike and I discussed this, and he was coming up with a small fuse holder using 'mini blade' fuses to fit in the back of the headlamp shell, but 'fraid I don't know how far he's progressed.

One fuse I most-strongly recommend is the 'main' fuse in the one-and-only wire attached to the battery 'earth' (positive or negative) terminal. For reasons now 'lost in the mists', '68-on, 'original Lucas' moved the main/only standard fuse from the battery 'earth terminal' to the 'non-earth terminal'; as you find in all the old-Britbike internet forums, hapless owners have found this later fuse position doesn't protect from an increasingly-common type of short-circuit ... :kaboom

Because the main fuse is the solitary wire to/from one battery terminal (say battery +ve as standard on your bike), while individual circuit fuses would be connected to the other battery terminal (say battery -ve on your bike), I've often found it easier to using individual fuse holders that clip together - additional holders for spare fuses are easy to include and, if possible, fuse holders can be grouped easily.

Answers to questions you didn't ask:- :)
Suppliers - I've used Vehicle Wiring Products and Autosparks since that first rewire, always good service, never any problems.

Wire - I use mainly 9-strand (9/0.030) to and from individual components, except where the 'original Lucas' colour code isn't available, when I use 14/0.30. I use 28/0.30 'thinwall' for wires common to several circuits - Brown/Blue, Brown/White, Red or Black ('positive earth' or 'negative earth' respectively) between the two 8-way snap connectors and from one to the respective battery terminal. I use these wire sizes specifically because crimp-on bullet terminals that work long-term are easily-available.

Terminals - Never had any problems with standard crimp-on 1/4" (wide) spades or 3/16" OD bullets. Many modern pattern electrical component makers use 3.9 mm. OD 'Japanese bullets', they're OK in themselves but the multi-way female connectors are harder to obtain and are limited to 4-way maximum; rewiring Japanese bikes, I often use 3/16" OD bullets simply because up to 8-way common connectors are available.

Wrapping - Never wrapped a harness I've built. I usually build on the bike; when the first one was finished, I didn't have any overwhelming desire to detach it from the bike to wrap it and then reattach it. The accessibility has since proved a boon for modifications and upgrades. Most of the wiring's covered by seat, tank and sidepanel; any still exposed (e.g. between tank and headlamp shell) I cover with what's called either Slit Convoluted Tubing or Split Convoluted Conduit; same stuff, the Slit/Split is along the Tubing/Conduit so it can be fitted over/pulled off wires without needing to disconnect and thread them.

Hth.

Regards,
 

Registered
Joined
1,301 Posts
Would like to paint my Bitsa frame very much, but unfortunately don't have a space for it.
So it will be powder coated like ma Trident frame.
 

Registered
Joined
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #33
Frame top coat done and I'm calling it a night. Just need to flat it back tomorrow evening and put the lacquer on. Then a couple of days to harden, and the first new bolts should be going in by the weekend.

I painted and lacquered the bottom halves of the lower tubes last week, so the frame has been resting on dry, finished paint. If theres any obvious lines when it's all done, I'll cut the two jobs in if needed, but given the location (You'd need to inspect the finish on your hands and knees) it should be fine.

Couldn't resist a little before and after (well, still during technically) pic. I would call it an improvement 馃檪
 

Attachments

Registered
Joined
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
Thank you so much Stuart. Really good info as always, especially on the wiring. Very much appreciate your description of the basis of your loom design. Logical and easy to follow, thank you. Component suppliers noted too. :)

Interesting you mention those replica clocks. Are they any good? I wouldn鈥檛 expect miracles for that money, but they seem almost too cheap.
 

Registered
Joined
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #35 (Edited)
Sorry Stuart, now I am in front of a proper computer, I want to give your massively helpful and detailed post the response it deserves. :)

Hi Dan,


So you should be, looks PDG in your pictures.

One thing to be aware of is, when you start to tighten nuts and bolts, even if you put a washer under the nut/bolt, the washer'll still rotate and gouge a circular mark in the paint; they do even in powder-coating. One way I reduced the gouging considerably was to use two thin (generally 1 mm. thick) washers back-to-back.
I did wonder about this. I've ordered a load of thin washers, so will try this.

Ashley Pople for repairs (the rev. counter could probably also do with a service?) or a pair of the 'sixty-quid pattern' ones?


If you wire it in, connect a short length of wire between its terminals. It'll then only indicate half what's actually either being drawn from or charging the battery but, when (note not "if" :bluduh) vibration does disintegrate the Ammeter, it won't stop the bike ... unless a loose part falls somewhere to make a short-circuit and blow the main fuse ... Note also that, on a Brit twin, vibration does ... errr ... affect ... "indicate" ...
Have you any experience of these pattern clocks? They seem suspiciously cheap to me, but I'm aware there are bargains out there. The idea of just putting new ones in at that price appeals massively.

Re the ammeter, the other idea I had on this (not sure if it's workable) is to wire in a permanent bypass, but broken with a switch. This would normally be off, sending everything through the ammeter (so a correct reading). If the ammeter were to fail for any reason and go open circuit, simply flicking the switch on should connect the bypass wire and allow the bike to run. I haven't got as far as thinking about where to locate this switch yet. It's just an idea at this point.


Used a '70/'73-'75 'dry frame' grab rail - these have the 'hoop' behind the seat and rear indicator mounting holes in the triangular gussets between the two 'hoops'. Note: you can't use an oif grabrail as the "'hoop' behind the seat" is further forward; '71/'72 have smaller holes in the gussets, to mount reflectors.
My grab rail has holes in the gussets which would look to be ideal for indicator mounting (see pic). I was really hoping to save this after an initially very encouraging response to some tin foil and WD40, and for the most part, it cleaned up quite nicely, but there's some heavier corrosion on the tube on the inside of the gussets which is just a little too far gone to save, I think.

Didn't fancy standard Lucas indicators so I bought something smaller and less-obtrusive from M&P. Mine have 10mm. OD stems; the mounting holes in the headlamp brackets and grabrail are 7/16" ID for Lucas indicators so I filled the gaps with off-the-shelf O-rings for a bit of extra vibe protection. Also, the M&P indicators had supply and return wires as standard, :thumb Risking telling you something you know already, if you pick LED indicators, you need a LED-specific relay.

. Replaced the standard horn-'n'-dipswitch with the cluster used first on the T160, later on the '76-'78 twins - adds indicators switch and headlamp flash to the horn and dipswitch functions. The Sparx pattern is more-easily available than original Lucas but the quality of much recent Sparx stuff isn't great. :( Hinckley used a not-dissimilar-looking cluster pre-'04 and there's a US company that also makes one, albeit they're both in black with some brightly-coloured levers and buttons. Hinckley also used a compact kill (and electric-start) switch on the right 'bar. I can supply more details of the Hinckley and other cluster if required.
All great info, thank you

Modern voltage regulator - I recommend either A-Reg3, Podtronics 3-phase or https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/12V-Motorcycle-Voltage-Regulator-Rectifier-For-Honda-PC31-CBR600-CBR900RR-Hot/352693724924?hash=item521e2f26fc:g:7d0AAOSw4DJdBwME (plus https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/High-Performance-Motorcycle-Voltage-Regulator-Solid-Rectifier-for-Honda-CBR-SD/173936133350?hash=item287f66c4e6:g:kU4AAOSwaOpbmiiB). The first two both have great customer backup, the Ebay one is so cheap you can buy two ... but they have proved very reliable. :thumb 3-phase reg./rec. because: you can connect the bike's existing single-phase alternator to one; when you come to upgrade the alternator, 3-phase is the 'most bang for your buck' so not a lot of point also paying to upgrade a relatively-new single-phase reg./rec.

Aside, your bike's original alternator stator was/is 3-wire but single-phase; also, it's relatively feeble by modern standards - ~8.5 Amps/100 Watts @ 5,000 rpm, assuming original 51-year-old rotor magnetism is still good ...
All good info, thank you. I will upgrade the alternator as a matter of course. It seems daft to re-use the old one given the extent of the project. I've heard lots of good things about Podtronics regulators, but the eBay one is a thought given it's so cheap as to be effectively disposable.

You know it doesn't change how the electrics actually work? I swap between the two 'systems' without any problems, bearing in mind 'earth' in DC is just jargon, so I never think of it.
I was thinking the same thing as I typed it ;)

I rewired my first Triumph - one of my T160's - over the '82/'83 winter, followed the Lucas system and the electrics have been totally reliable; subsequently, I've also made the electrics of several old Jap bikes more reliable using the same principles ... The system I use was/is a simplification of what I found in the T160's original loom; I've used it ever since on every bike I've rewired:-

. Two '8-way' (four wires in each end) standard bullet snap connectors, one in the headlamp shell, one in the area under the seat;

. individual components connected to the nearest '8-way', including the battery 'earth terminal' to the under-seat 8-way;

. the two 8-ways connected together by two lengths of thicker wire, those two lengths joined:-

.. either at a ring terminal attached to an engine component (e.g. one of the head-steady bolts);

.. or at a '4-way' (two wires in each end) standard bullet snap connector above said engine component, with another wire from the 4-way to the engine component.


Again bear in mind, while your bike didn't have a separate "accessories" circuit, as standard it had separate circuits for ignition, headlamp, other lamps and horn. However, unless you're a habitual Idiot's Lantern user, you might find an actual "accessories circuit" is unnecessary - with standard 'original Lucas' colour codes easily-available, unswitched, switched-by-ignition, switched-by-lights and common supply or return wiring are easily-identifiable for connecting additional gadgets.

Fuses - is advising blade fuses stating the obvious?

The practical problem I've encountered with separate fuses for different circuits is - as both the switches that separate the circuits and the items they switch are mostly at the front of the bike - where to mount the fuse box/group the fuse holders without running lots of wires up and down the bike? Year or so ago, guy who posts on Britbike and I discussed this, and he was coming up with a small fuse holder using 'mini blade' fuses to fit in the back of the headlamp shell, but 'fraid I don't know how far he's progressed.

One fuse I most-strongly recommend is the 'main' fuse in the one-and-only wire attached to the battery 'earth' (positive or negative) terminal. For reasons now 'lost in the mists', '68-on, 'original Lucas' moved the main/only standard fuse from the battery 'earth terminal' to the 'non-earth terminal'; as you find in all the old-Britbike internet forums, hapless owners have found this later fuse position doesn't protect from an increasingly-common type of short-circuit ... :kaboom

Because the main fuse is the solitary wire to/from one battery terminal (say battery +ve as standard on your bike), while individual circuit fuses would be connected to the other battery terminal (say battery -ve on your bike), I've often found it easier to using individual fuse holders that clip together - additional holders for spare fuses are easy to include and, if possible, fuse holders can be grouped easily.
Fantastic help! Thank you :) Your suggested layout seems very logical and straightforward. I want to keep in mind 'fixability' and expandability (if needed) as I do this, and your point about using wire colours to identify the groups (and sticking to the Lucas colour scheme) is noted.

Answers to questions you didn't ask:- :)
Suppliers - I've used Vehicle Wiring Products and Autosparks since that first rewire, always good service, never any problems.

Wire - I use mainly 9-strand (9/0.030) to and from individual components, except where the 'original Lucas' colour code isn't available, when I use 14/0.30. I use 28/0.30 'thinwall' for wires common to several circuits - Brown/Blue, Brown/White, Red or Black ('positive earth' or 'negative earth' respectively) between the two 8-way snap connectors and from one to the respective battery terminal. I use these wire sizes specifically because crimp-on bullet terminals that work long-term are easily-available.

Terminals - Never had any problems with standard crimp-on 1/4" (wide) spades or 3/16" OD bullets. Many modern pattern electrical component makers use 3.9 mm. OD 'Japanese bullets', they're OK in themselves but the multi-way female connectors are harder to obtain and are limited to 4-way maximum; rewiring Japanese bikes, I often use 3/16" OD bullets simply because up to 8-way common connectors are available.

Wrapping - Never wrapped a harness I've built. I usually build on the bike; when the first one was finished, I didn't have any overwhelming desire to detach it from the bike to wrap it and then reattach it. The accessibility has since proved a boon for modifications and upgrades. Most of the wiring's covered by seat, tank and sidepanel; any still exposed (e.g. between tank and headlamp shell) I cover with what's called either Slit Convoluted Tubing or Split Convoluted Conduit; same stuff, the Slit/Split is along the Tubing/Conduit so it can be fitted over/pulled off wires without needing to disconnect and thread them.
Great advice, and thanks for the supplier recommendations. I was pondering wrapping, as I couldn't work out how to do it without pulling it all off again. Will investigate the split tubing you suggest.

Massively, thank you :)
 

Attachments

Registered
Joined
43 Posts
Discussion Starter #40
Congrats with your finished frame, what do you plan to do with wheels ?
Thanks Adam. Great question on the wheels. I鈥檝e spoken to a mate who has a decent collection of 50s and 60s bikes (16 at last count!!) and he is passing me the details of a local wheel builder that he recommends highly. Plan is to take them down there and talk through options. I know the spokes and rims are toast, but I鈥檓 hoping something can be done with the hubs. Regardless, I need to get them properly inspected and measured, then go from there.

This part is going to be big bucks regardless, so currently pressing on with the fork rebuild (left one came apart completely in about 15 minutes this evening and no internal horror stories apart from the previously noted rusty stanchions and entirely expected brittle seals). The only bit that gave me any grief with was the interference fit washer above the seal, which took some persuading to pop free. New stanchions (old ones carefully measured for reference), seals, springs, gaiters, and oil (after some careful cleaning and painting of the sliders of course), and they should be good to go. Not too horrific cost-wise. :smile2:
 
21 - 40 of 79 Posts
Top