Triumph Rat Motorcycle Forums banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I would like to know if I would be able to heat up enough to soften the aluminum on this 1967 primary cover to push a dent caused by the footpeg without cracking or doing damage to the cover.your reply`s will be appreciated.
Juan

[/url][/IMG]

[/url][/IMG]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,520 Posts
Yes, but it's a case of suck it see. I have done it using a hot air gun and a hide mallet and it worked well.

Rod
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,950 Posts
I once tried to fix an aluminum bicycle kickstand with a torch.
It ended up as a blackened blob.


If I were compelled to save that particular cover I might seek out an aircraft welder. I had the bottom lug of an aluminum fork repaired by one such miracle worker.


That being said, your cover isn't particularly pretty and they can be found pretty cheap (currently) on the EBAY..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the reply guys. I have a heat gun and will give it a try. This is the primary cover for my TR6R and I thought I would ask before trying. On my T140V I tried using some welding rods by Eastwood and I ended with a repair that didn`t match the aluminum on the primary case and ended up buying a good used one that I polished. I have seen new ones on the bay is just that I want to play with this one. Thanks again.
Juan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,520 Posts
Work slowly, heating the metal between blows with the other side supported on a rubber block or piece of wood. Metal responds to patience.

Rod
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,729 Posts
use some soap from a bar as a temperature guide - rub some over the area you are going to heat -- when it goes black you are at a temperature that the ali will readily move - but at that point dont add more heat -- having said that ; a heat gun is unlikely to easily reach that sort of temperature
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,435 Posts
Don’t use any grit coarser than 100 when refinishing that case, progressively move to smaller grit. A vibratory sander can work wonders on that . Keep it moving and uniform so you don’t dig in or change a contour. I think you can get most of that damage out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,520 Posts
Stuart, an old fashioned panel beaters leather sand / shot bag would be ideal. I try and think of the most likely things someone would have hanging around.

On a similar vane, you could try and knock that dent out cold but you risk cracking the case. You could use an oxy acetylene set or big blow torch to heat it and probably knock it out in one go but this assumes the user has this equipment and is experienced enough to control the amount of heat and not melt or distort the case.

On the other hand most people have a heat gun in the shed and whilst it will take some patience the risk of a catastrophic cock up is significantly reduced. I've also removed the same dent from my own primary using this method.

Rod
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
325 Posts
Or another pov is this is an old bike and the dent is one of its scars? :)
you know, i'm beginning to look at the old machines with more of this point of view as well.

these things are old, finally, and becoming rare. their miscellaneous beat-up parts are becoming less of a aesthetic hindrance and more of their history.

i have some stuff that's pretty pristine, but the cosmetic beaters are the ones that are getting my attention.

if it isn't a functional flaw, i'm tending to ignore them these days and leave the point-restorations for younger people with less-seasoned views of permanence.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
you know, i'm beginning to look at the old machines with more of this point of view as well.

these things are old, finally, and becoming rare. their miscellaneous beat-up parts are becoming less of a aesthetic hindrance and more of their history.

i have some stuff that's pretty pristine, but the cosmetic beaters are the ones that are getting my attention.

if it isn't a functional flaw, i'm tending to ignore them these days and leave the point-restorations for younger people with less-seasoned views of permanence.
I agree with your point of view but I will be placing a lot of new parts on the bike and would like it to have good appearance. It`s a cafe racer project and if I can make it look good I will use it because it bolonged to the bike originally. I have been working on this project on and off for many years and I`m trying to finish it. I even made a Dunstall style front fender to fit my 1972 conical front end.
Juan



[/url][/IMG]
[/url][/IMG]
[/url][/IMG]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Any idea on why all Juan's images have been blocked?
Hello Boogie
I really don`t know why some people can see them and others can`t, might be the place I use to host images. Will Check. Can you see the image I just Added?
Juan

[/url][/IMG]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
if it isn't a functional flaw, i'm tending to ignore them these days and leave the point-restorations for younger people with less-seasoned views of permanence.
Good advice. So many 'restored' machines I see are fabulous to the eye, but when you lay a spanner to them the truth is revealed. It's not easy I know, but maintaining, rebuilding to show or even a good standard requires more than studious observance of pinstripe detail. It has to not only work, but work as well or better than when it was produced. Function over form is my mantra.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
I was able to raise the dent using a propane torch,wooden mallet,wood dowel and an aluminum dowel. I held the primary cover with a leather glove and when I felt thru the glove the heat I paced the primary cover over a piece of wood and hit it with the mallet that I made it turned out to be too light so I placed a round piece of wood and the hit it with a ball peen hammer. That got results but still had smaller areas low so I heated again the cover and using a round wooden dowel I raised those areas. To get one that was close to the reinforcing rib on the back of the cover I used the small aluminum Dowel. I still need to do a lot of sanding so I ordered an Orbital sander to see if I can remove the scratches. I know is going to be hard to remove them all. Here are some pics I hope all of you can see them.
Juan

[/url][/IMG]
[/url][/IMG]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,257 Posts
Hi Juan,
Nice job on the dent.
Be careful with that orbital sander on the sharp stying edges on the cover, a power sander can round them off in seconds and when they are gone, you won’t be getting them back.

Regards
Peg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
204 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Hi Juan,
Nice job on the dent.
Be careful with that orbital sander on the sharp stying edges on the cover, a power sander can round them off in seconds and when they are gone, you won’t be getting them back.

Regards
Peg.
Hello Peg
I will be careful I bought a variable speed orbital sander that will help a lot,sanding by hand is a tediuos job. I have a feel for compound curves from being a model airplane builder. I learned a lot about shaping parts and developed manual dexterity. After looking at the part I know I wont be able to remove all the scratches but since it will be covering a belt drive maybe I could make some cooling holes that might help eliminate some of them. Thanks for the advice.
Juan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Now that you've done it here's the technique that my welding instructor taught me many years ago at a community college.

1. Light an oxy/acetylene torch with an acetylene only flame.
2. Apply a layer of acetylene soot over the area you want to heat and straighten.
3. Adjust torch to a neutral flame, perhaps use a rosebud tip.
4. Gradually heat area that's covered with soot.
5. When the soot disappears part is at the right temperature to straighten.
6. Straighten part right when the soot disappears

This is of course for aluminum and worked well to straighten the brake or clutch lever I had bent
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top