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Hello. Thought I'd get serious and post progress (since I'm finally making some) on a bike I've owned for over 25 years...

My girlfriend (now my wife of over 22 years) bought the bike for me in Missoula, Montana from a character who mostly dealt in Indian bikes and parts. The Triumph had been stored outside under a tarp for a while, but it was a matching numbers bike with a California title, though it hadn't been registered since 1979.

We did get it started, but it wasn't really safe to ride in the state it was in, and I commenced to strip it down shortly after. Needless to say, it has essentially remained in that state for many years, with a few attempts to get the project going again at different times… money being the main factor in continuing.
We lived in Portland, Oregon for a while. I met the Sandy Bandit. Dave Wedlake fixed my sidestand lug, sidecover and chainguard.

We moved back to Iowa and I started back on the bike in earnest a few years ago. I’ve found someone locally to help me with the bottom end of the engine… which is basically finished. Klempf’s did head and cylinder bore work several years ago.

At this point I’m focusing on finishing up the frame to a point where we can get the engine fitted and started up. My goal is to keep as close to correct as is feasible using original parts when I can find them. The bike was missing a lot of stuff. I have most of the big stuff now. I am thoroughly acquainted with the parts manual. :)

I haven’t posted a lot, but I am constantly on this site. I’m usually able to find answers to my questions in a search. Snakeoil’s write up of his restoration on the same year bike has also been immensely helpful.

Triumph_94.JPG


The bike when I bought it...1994

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As it sits this afternoon... handlebars are ready to mount, but I can't do this until I get it out of the sunporch. I'm working on mounting fenders. The chainguard isn't bolted. I realized I'm going to have to remove the rear wheel again to mount this which should probably be mounted before fitting the rear fender... aggh! Of course I'm missing the front bolts for the chainguard.

Anyways, I'll try to keep up with updates. Thanks for looking.

Scot
1966 T120R DU38319
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Mounting center stand

I read a few different ways to do this, but this is what worked for me...

Bolting up the center stand is easy enough... attaching the spring is another story. I used a section of single strand electrical wire, and with the spring attached to the center stand I looped the wire around the end of the spring. I then ran the other end of the wire through the front engine mount. I tied the ends of the wire together and used a pliers to wind the wire which in turn stretches the spring. If you've ever staked a tree, it's the same process. I was able to stretch the spring to a point to get the other end around the tab on the swingarm. I suppose if you had the engine in you could tie the wire around the front wheel or some other fixed point. I left the insulation on the wire so it wouldn't damage the finish.

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Really nice, my bike is just a little earlier than yours, but heres a little inspiration

Before


and an embarrassingly long time later



All the best
Rod
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Awesome! Thanks for the inspiration Rod!

Got the engine in the frame. It went pretty well just lifting it in myself as my daughter fed the stud through the front engine mount. I brought it in from the primary side with the front of the engine tipped up, then lowered it into the front mount. Thick towels were used to protect the frame.

Trying to figure out what to tackle next...

718676


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Just a helpful suggestion for you. I found this out the hard way on the 1962 Bonneville I am restoring. Not sure if it is the same on your 66 but, it would have been one million times easier to install the chain guard before installing the rear fender. You wouldn't think so, but trust me it would have been. The way I did mine, starting from where you are now, finish engine build, install front fender, headlight bucket, oil tank, oil lines, mount as much of the electrical as you can (rectifier, horn, etc). Start running the wiring, install chainguard and rear fender so you can finish wiring for the back half of the bike, throttle cable, etc. The very last thing I install is the gas tank. I don't want to have to take that off and on and rish scratching it. I even start the engine and tune without the gas tank by using an auxiliary tank hung from an IV Pole I have in the garage. Also, I mount up some old headers to start and tune the bike so I don't run the risk of blueing my brand new headers due to too lean of a carb setting intitially. They will blue in seconds. After tuned and I am sure the bike is running well, then I install the new shiny headers.

Just my 2 cents.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Just a helpful suggestion for you. I found this out the hard way on the 1962 Bonneville I am restoring. Not sure if it is the same on your 66 but, it would have been one million times easier to install the chain guard before installing the rear fender. You wouldn't think so, but trust me it would have been. The way I did mine, starting from where you are now, finish engine build, install front fender, headlight bucket, oil tank, oil lines, mount as much of the electrical as you can (rectifier, horn, etc). Start running the wiring, install chainguard and rear fender so you can finish wiring for the back half of the bike, throttle cable, etc. The very last thing I install is the gas tank. I don't want to have to take that off and on and rish scratching it. I even start the engine and tune without the gas tank by using an auxiliary tank hung from an IV Pole I have in the garage. Also, I mount up some old headers to start and tune the bike so I don't run the risk of blueing my brand new headers due to too lean of a carb setting intitially. They will blue in seconds. After tuned and I am sure the bike is running well, then I install the new shiny headers.

Just my 2 cents.

Rob
Thanks Rob. I'm a process, checklist sort of person, so your advice really helps.

I actually posted a question a few weeks ago about mounting the fenders. One of the things I was concerned about was the rear fender's close relationship to the chain guard. I was advised by my mechanic to install and finish the engine build, so the chain can be fitted... then install the chain guard, then rear fender. So I did switch course, and am now working on finishing the engine.

My mechanic who went through the bottom end and has helped with a few other things wants to do the initial startup and has the exact same setup you described.

Best -

Scot
 

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Hey Scot,

Yes, if you are following my restoration of a 1962 Bonneville, I mention the chain guard. On my bike, you definitely want to mount the chain guard before the rear fender. Almost impossible otherwise. So yes, install the chain, chain guard, then rear fender.

Good luck and let me know if you want to know anything else.

Rob
 
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