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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Is this bike relatively rare,desirable or valuable.

Would it be worth my while to drive 4 hours to go and have a look at this one for US $5000.00 ?

I`m assuming that if the frame and engine numbers don`t match that it`s no more valuable than a TR6 or Bonne of that vintage;true or false ?

I have not been able to contact the seller yet to obtain any further details but I`m assuming that this bike will sell quickly if it`s genuine.

Would anyone care to advise or share an opinion ?

Cheers
 

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I would love to have a TT special but I think $5000 is too much for a basket case, especially one of unknown condition. Not to mention having to drive 4 hrs just to look at it. They are pretty rare though and being a competition bike, few survived in original condition.
 

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Up to you...

I'd give (just about) anything for a T120TT mostly for the nostalgia of the Ascot Park days, etc - plus they're obviously rare.

There were two on eBay this month - fully restored - they were both asking $18,000. One sold for $11,000 and the other is still for sale.

About a year ago there was one in Grants Pass Oregon listed on eBay for $8,000 and it was original, but a strong runner. I think Baxter's had one this year too.

Let's consider this: What's it cost to fully restore a T120R or a Bonneville? $4,000-6,000? If that's true (and I don't know if it is) then adding in your $5,000 initial cost seems to cut the value of the finished bike pretty thin...

If I won a great big lottery, I'd have one no matter the cost - but I'm not going to mortgage the farm for a basket case.

Up to you...
 

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I would wait until you can establish contact with the seller , then ask him to e-mail you photos of what he actually has and then you can check that the Frame and engine Nos. match .
Carryout an assessment of the general state of the parts that have been taken apart , you can tell a lot if indeed, they are the correct type for that year of bike etc. that should assist you in our decision, to take the enquiry further or leave it .
I am not up to speed with how much these bikes are worth in the USA – but I would say if you are only in it for the money then after you make the purchase and carryout the restoration costs , you would probably be better off actually buying one that has been fully restored .
Good luck and try and see if you can obtain some photos and post them here and I am sure some members will be able to give you the benefit of there experiences and knowledge.
:)
 

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Mobe, I agree with what has already been said about purchasing a basket case bike. I've done it a few times thinking to turn a quick buck, only to end up unable to recoupe the money I spent putting it back together.

Now if its a bike I know I'm going to be keeping, then I get that "deer in the headlights" mind set and damn the cost. :D
 

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To me, $5,000 for a basketcase 66 TT sounds a bit on the high side.

IF...

IF the numbers match

IF all of the main components are there and original

IF it has a title

IF it has any verifiable history

IF the frame is straight

IF the engine was never badly blown

...it STILL might be too high.

IF you do all the work yourself and do it RIGHT

IF you find great deals on missing parts

IF you have a really good source for goor replacement and overhaul bits

IF you have time to wait for Don hutchinson to paint the tank (or if you have an equally good source of paint)

...it STILL might be too high.

IF you have at least $10K to spend, you MIGHT end up with a bike worth more than you paid for it, a year or so from now.

Granted, there aren't many '66 TTs out there for sale under $10K, but there are some that have sold for OVER $10K that weren't actually TTs!
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Thanks for your time everyone,I`m gonna forget about this one for now .

Maybe in two or three months if the bike remains unsold I`ll think it over once more,and in the mean time I can do some more homework on it.

I do however have one mystery to solve before all else,how should the serial number read?
T120C
T120TT

I`ve seen both and I don`t know which one is correct for 1966.

Thanks, MoBe
 

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Discussion Starter #10
These threads will educate you prety well on the subject of TTs...

http://www.triumphrat.net/classic-vintage-and-veteran/122757-searching-history-of-t120tt-jke-42d.html?highlight=t120tt

http://www.triumphrat.net/classic-vintage-and-veteran/74059-numbers-game.html?highlight=t120tt

http://www.triumphrat.net/classic-vintage-and-veteran/14851-bonneville-tt.html?highlight=t120tt

I know there are at least one or two more VERY GOOD threads on this subject, with many photos of the "ghosted" double stamping and frame details.
Thanks GPZ !:Wave
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well as sad looking as the motor is I think the numbers look right,of course you`ll have to verify them for correctness.
 

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I have collected, off of e-bay, a port folio of 90 1966 T120 models. The breakdown is as follows: 5 x 1966 T120 UK, 76 x 1966 T120R US, 9 x 1966 T120TT US models. With the exception of 14 of these 1966 T120's, all have matching numbers. The main colours are Grenadier Red and Alaskan White, with variations Pacific Blue/Alaskan White, black, green, Purple/Alaskan White, Emerald/Alaskan White and 1 brown.
Some of the 1966 T120's were originally TT models but have been made street legal. Prices range from $18.000 in November 2010, $4.825 in July 10 (not sold), $5.000 again in November 2010 (not sold), $11.000 in November 2009 (built to street legal level), $8.677 in December 2010 (built to street legal level), $12.500 in November 2009, $13.599 in July 2011 (This was the 4th time on e-bay and not sold). All these T120TT models are roadworthy and in fine condition. As you can see some have been sold reasonably cheap in comparison to the highest price, and of course a few have not met reserve prices. You could get lucky. My own 1966 model is a plain T120 exported from the UK. If you need any pictures, mail me at [email protected].
 

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After reading these posts om 66tt s. It looks like I just have a motor. It needs a total rebuild and I dont have the original head for it. Here is a pic of the #s. It looks correct to me . Any thoughts??
The number is correct for the 1966 T120TT. I can verify it by relating to my port folio of 1966 T120TTs, two of which are DU39480 and DU39744. Your engine number is just short of 39744. But what about the frame? does that also have the same number, if not the value of the bike will sink.
 

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For what it's worth, in NYS, you do not need a title for a pre-'73 bike. So, you could simply find any '66 frame, grind, weld up and restamp the numbers on the frame with the correct stamps and have an instant numbers matching TT frame and engine. After that, it's just a matter of collecting the correct cycle parts. I'm sure that Kindgdome 1 already knows this so I'm not revealing any secrets here.

I have to say that the engine numbers look awfully neat. I need to take another look at how others are stamped, the TT certainly seem way to properly aligned to reflect your average factory stamping.

I'm admittedly a noob compared to others here. But based on what I've seen, the T120 or TR6 numbers are normally pretty neat and my guess are either a gang stamp (individual numbers clamped in a stamp holder) or a custom 1 piece stamp made for repeated use. Then the suffix numbers/letters and the serial number are added on the assembly line with individual stamps and a hammer and look like they were done by a drunken sailor.

If you look at the T120TT, the first T is a bit cockeyed. If it were a gang stamp or one piece tool the first T and 120 would be perfectly aligned. The TT is pretty good and appears to be the same font and depth as the T120. I think that is another clue that it is wrong. The TT would have been an individual stamp and might have come out aligned right (by luck) but would not have been the same depth. Chance are the TT and the serial number would all be the same font and depth because the same guy stamped them.

Not saying this is a fake, but, if it were my money, I'd want to compare it to known TT bikes before spent a nickel.

I was watching a show the other night where a 1 in 1000 Winchester 73 was proven to be a fake. It had been around for over 60 years and appeared in some very respected books on Winchesters. When things are rare, they are often fakes and human nature makes you want to believe you just stuck gold.

Kingdome 1, not trying to rain on your parade here. Just giving my opinion based on what I've seen and what I see here.

regards,
Rob
 

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Deja Vous to me. I bought a '66T120TT bad shape for $5K 5 yrs. ago an spent an additional $20K plus or minus on it.
You have to want it, and it really is a great ride.
See it in my album.
 

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Not saying this is a fake, but, if it were my money, I'd want to compare it to known TT bikes before spent a nickel.

regards,
Rob
Have pictures of 7-8 T120TT's with stamped engine numbers visible. The T120 is straight and neat, the TT appears to be a little offset and in one of the pictures appears a bit too deep. The DU looks pretty standard on all the pictures. The serial numbers vary from close up to the DU and straight to an evenly spaced distance from the DU. Once again the serial numbers show the first two numbers straight and the last three possibly punched in by hand. I believe that Triumph UK did not have an automatic punch for the serial numbers and that the last three digits were hand punched, by different workers at the factory. Hence some look like a drunk has affixed the last two or three digits in the serial number:confused:.

I hear what you say about false numbers, but these pictures are pretty good proof that they are original. Some of the sellers are well known (in the US), so I don't think they would put their reputation on the line for a forgery. (But you never know);). I can supply pictures if necessary of these variations.
Gordon
 

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Maybe in two or three months if the bike remains unsold I`ll think it over once more,
I do however have one mystery to solve before all else,how should the serial number read?
T120C
T120TT

I`ve seen both and I don`t know which one is correct for 1966.

Thanks, MoBe
To give you an idea on the various letters after the T120:
T120 - home market - UK
T120R - export model intended for the US market.
T120C - competition model with high-level exhaust pipes.
T120TT - off road model. In 1968 Evel Knievel nearly killed himself on one of these after jumping the Caesar's Palace Casino fountians.
T120RT - a special 750cc model manufactured by Triumph's American arm to permit them to be used in American Motorcycle Association production-based racing events.
T120V - 650cc oil-in-frame model with 5-speed gearbox and front disc brake.
With exception to the T120V and possibly the T120RT all the others are applicable for 1966.
Gordon
 

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So, you could simply find any '66 frame, grind, weld up and restamp the numbers on the frame with the correct stamps and have an instant numbers matching TT frame and engine.
Yikes. What you'd have is a bitsa (nothing wrong with that) and an attempted fraud on any future buyer/owner/judge/etc. What you most certainly would not have is a 'numbers matching TT frame and engine'.

Please don't even consider doing this, as it's wrong on so many levels...

Ken
 

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For what it's worth, in NYS, you do not need a title for a pre-'73 bike. So, you could simply find any '66 frame, grind, weld up and restamp the numbers on the frame with the correct stamps and have an instant numbers matching TT frame and engine.
Yikes. What you'd have is a bitsa (nothing wrong with that) and an attempted fraud on any future buyer/owner/judge/etc. What you most certainly would not have is a 'numbers matching TT frame and engine'.

Please don't even consider doing this, as it's wrong on so many levels...

Ken
To be honest, Snakeoil, I was a little surprised at your suggestion too. To me, you've always been like a Triumph superhero, helping others as do many other good members here (too many to mention). It's like you momentarily went to the Dark Side. You're back now though, right?
(Or maybe I just misunderstood what you meant...)



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